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Teresa R. Cabrera

Home rule

House Democrats push for bill to dramatically expand domestic rule in DC

Congressional Democrats are pushing legislation that would dramatically expand “home rule” in DC, untying the city’s government from federal oversight of its criminal and legislative processes.

The House Oversight Committee on Tuesday proposed legislation that would eliminate a congressional review period for legislation passed by the DC Council.

The legislation would also grant the district exclusive authority to prosecute crimes under city law and grant clemency for those crimes. As it stands, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia serves as both the local and federal prosecutor.

“The committee’s passage of the District of Columbia Autonomy Extension Act is an important step toward giving DC the autonomy it deserves and preventing DC from being crippled by the federal government,” said Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, Democrat of New York and chair of the Oversight Committee.

Allowing Republican lawmakers to second guess local actions is a sore point for the Democratic-controlled city, which says it should have the final say on its own affairs.

For years, city Democrats have argued with national Republicans over local rules on issues like marijuana and school choice.

Representative Jody Hice of Georgia has led Republicans in opposing the autonomy bill, saying the district has gone too far with COVID-19 restrictions and can’t handle rising crime.

“At a time of increasing violent crime in the District, we should not be eroding the law in DC any further,” Mr. Hice said.

City officials are seeking DC statehood as a way to shake off congressional oversight. But they have also pushed for more limited measures, such as greater autonomy or a voting seat in the House.

DC Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat who is a nonvoting House member, sponsored the new bill. She said it would be the biggest expansion of DC’s autonomy in nearly 50 years.

The bill is expected to receive support from the Democratic-controlled House, but will face GOP filibuster in the Senate.

The House previously passed legislation that would give DC statehood or allow the mayor to activate the National Guard, as governors do, but neither bill passed the equally divided Senate.

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Self government

Thiruvananthapuram local self-government bodies promote flower cultivation for Onam

Flowers are grown in several panchayats in Thiruvananthapuram in view of the Onam market

Flowers are grown in several panchayats in Thiruvananthapuram in view of the Onam market

Dew-soaked marigolds, chrysanthemums, jasmine and oleander in full bloom sway in the breeze at Plamoottukkada near Parassala, about 30 kilometers from Thiruvananthapuram. Here, on an 80-cent plot, the Parassala block panchayat is promoting Poovili 2022, a project to encourage floriculture.

Also in Thiruvananthapuram, marigolds are also grown on almost 8.51 acres in six grama panchayats spread over the block panchayats of Nemom and Vellanad.

Thiruvananthapuram local self-government bodies have made every effort to promote floriculture to take advantage of the blooming Onam market to make floral carpets, which are an integral part of the celebrations. The plan is to reduce reliance on flower markets in Kanyakumari district and Bengaluru during Onam. Several blocks and grama panchayats grow flowers on their own plots, albeit on a small scale.

“It was an ambitious project. But the result exceeded our expectations and we had a bumper crop, particularly of marigolds, in May this year. Now the second batch of marigolds is ready for harvest,” says SK Ben Darvin, Parassala bloc panchayat chairman. “We had people coming from other parts of the district to see the flowers,” adds Alvedisa A, vice president of the panchayat.

The Parassala block panchayat launched the project in March this year, as part of the five-year plan. Marigold in three shades of dark yellow and orange, oleander in red, pink and baby pink, and different varieties of jasmine such as kuttimulla and pichi have been planted.

Ambitious project

“We adopted the mulching method (to prevent weeds and protect the roots and soil) with drip irrigation. Initially, 20-day-old marigold saplings were planted and within two months we got the harvest. We get 40 to 50 flowers from one plant,” says S Vijayakumar, a former agricultural officer and Agro Service Center facilitator, who provided assistance and advice for the project.

SK Ben Darvin, Chairman, Parassala Block Panchayat, Alvedisa A, Vice Chairman of Panchayat and S Vijayakumar, Facilitator, Agro Service Center

SK Ben Darvin, Chairman, Parassala Block Panchayat, Alvedisa A, Vice Chairman of Panchayat and S Vijayakumar, Facilitator, Agro Service Center | Photo credit: SREEJITH R KUMAR

About 450 kilograms of marigold have been harvested up to July, in addition to 200 kilograms of chrysanthemum, 10 kilograms of jasmine and 15 kilograms of oleander. They have achieved sales worth ₹40,000 so far. The goal is to collect around 200 kilograms of flowers for Onam.

Oleander (arali)

Oleander ( Arali) | Photo credit: SREEJITH R KUMAR

Flower prices are the same as Thovala in Kanyakumari, Ben adds. Marigold, usually priced at ₹50-60 per kilogram, costs ₹250 and above during Onam. Oleander buds usually fetch ₹1,000 per kilogram, while flowers are sold at ₹150 per kilogram. Prices of both kuttimulla and pichinormally priced at ₹150 per kilogram, can go up to ₹1,000-1,500 during the festival, which coincides with the wedding season in Kerala.

SK Ben Darvin, President of the Parassala Block Panchayat, at the UP Lutheran School Worry Farm, Ponvila

SK Ben Darvin, Parassala Block Panchayat President, at Lutheran UP School Marigold Farm, Ponvila | Photo credit: SREEJITH R KUMAR

The first batch of jasmine and oleander continues to yield. “It is necessary to prune these plants regularly to ensure a better yield,” says Vijayakumar. The panchayat has also grown 30 cent marigold at the premises of UP Lutheran School, Ponvila, which is ready for harvest.

Floriculture in five grama panchayats of Vilappil, Vilavoorkkal, Malayinkeezhu, Maranalloor and Pallichal under the Nemom bloc panchayat, and Kattakkada under the Vellanad bloc panchayat was an initiative of MP Kattakkada IB Sathish. This is done under the close supervision of the Nemom bloc panchayat committee. The Kerala Land Use Board also provides the support.

Marigold Farm in Kattakkada

Marigold Farm in Kattakkada | Photo credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

It is implemented under the Pradhan Mantri Krishi Sinchayee Yojana (PMKSY) – Watershed Component in convergence with the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS). “It was a new venture, but we were able to implement it well,” says Ajikumar K, Block Development Manager at Nemom.

The 33 beneficiaries of the scheme include individual farmers and groups of farmers. “Our marigold farm is 20 cents. It was a challenge when we started but now we are looking forward to the harvest. As we have to water the plants twice a day, we do it in separate batches,” says Sheeja Kumari V, a member of a 20-member group from Maranalloor.

Inauguration of the marigold harvest in Pallichal.  The farm is managed by the Farm in Trivandrum group

Inauguration of the marigold harvest in Pallichal. The farm is managed by the Farm in Trivandrum group | Photo credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

Farm in Trivandrum (FiT), an agricultural joint venture, grows 50-cent marigolds in the Kannamkode neighborhood of Pallichal. “We grow several crops, especially fruit trees, tubers, etc. Marigold was introduced as an intercrop. The women employed under MGNREGS prepared the land and we did not have to spend on saplings as it was provided by the Krishi Bhavan. The harvest will start before Atham (August 30),” explains Vinod Venugopal, who conceptualized the FiT.

The panchayats plan to continue floriculture even after Onam. “It will be an additional source of income and our dream is to make it a flowery village,” adds Ben.

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Home rule

Andy Burnham: Scotland should be as close to home rule as possible

Scotland should be “as close as possible” to self-rule, Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham has said while discussing a possible second independence referendum.

Mr Burnham said he was still opposed to Scottish independence but said the UK’s constitution needed to be ‘completely rewired’.

He was interviewed by former Labor MSP Neil Findlay at an Edinburgh Fringe event on Tuesday.

Mr Burnham also told the audience that he had asked to meet First Minister Nicola Sturgeon during his visit to Scotland but had not heard back from his office.

The mayor said he asked to meet Nicola Sturgeon (Nigel French/PA)

The Scottish government later said that was not the case.

He also spoke about his dispute with the Scottish Government over Covid travel rules, saying the way the travel ban was imposed during the pandemic was an example of the “Scottish National Party dealing with the North of England with contempt”.

Mr Burnham said being mayor for the past five years has given him ‘more perspective on the Scottish independence debate’.

He said: “This country, the UK needs to be completely rewired, there needs to be a redistribution of power.”

He continued: “I understand how for Scotland to simply say ‘OK, status quo but with a bit more devolution’ is not an answer if there is to be another referendum.

“You must have a much better alternative next time and for me it is a completely rewired Westminster where I would say proportional representation for the Commons, an elected Nations and Regions Senate to replace the House of Lords.

“Much more devolution in all of this, as close to self-governing Scotland as possible, I would say.”

In Scotland, he said more powers should be transferred from Edinburgh to local communities.

Setting out in more detail his constitutional views, he said: “I never want to see a border run through the north of England and Scotland in my lifetime.”

The Mayor of Greater Manchester went on to discuss his dispute with the Scottish Government over the Covid travel ban imposed in the summer of 2021.

He said it was done without any notification or discussion with his office, adding: ‘What message do people in the Scottish Government think it sent to people in our place? Basically, “you’re not welcome”.

He continued: “We expect the Tories to treat the North of England with contempt, but it was the Scottish National Party who treated the North of England with contempt.”

Saying he was meeting Glasgow council leader Susan Aitken on Wednesday, he added: ‘I asked to meet the Prime Minister while I was here and got no response.

A Scottish Government spokesman said: ‘It is factually incorrect to say that no response has been sent to Mr Burnham’s request for a meeting.

“The Prime Minister’s Office contacted Mr Burnham’s office the same day the meeting request was received.

“Since then, in discussion with his office, an agenda has been agreed and dates identified.

“The Prime Minister remains open to holding this meeting.”

A Scottish Government spokesman later added: ‘Both offices have identified a suitable time for the meeting today and the First Minister looks forward to meeting Mr Burnham tomorrow (Wednesday).’

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Sovereignty

Dehcho Prepares Detailed Self-Government Proposal

Dehcho First Nations negotiators are pushing for regional consensus on a range of issues before approaching the Government of the Northwest Territories with a self-government proposal.

Chief negotiator and former Deh Cho MP Michael Nadli, lawyer Chris Reid and Grand Chief Herb Norwegian answered questions during a virtual town hall on Tuesday evening.

The DFN seeks to permanently establish sovereignty over how the following systems are run in Dehcho communities: justice, education, traditional medicine, culture and language, marriage, adoption and child welfare, income assistance and social housing, and Wills and Estates.

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Negotiators told members that, over the next few months, the focus will be on clarifying the DFN’s right to self-government and defining what it will look like, rather than land claims.

But Norwegian stressed that he would like to see conversations about land claims taking place alongside these talks.

“When I walked into this election, I made it very clear that I wanted to get the negotiations back on track,” Norwegian said in his opening speech. “This includes land and resources. This is how I was elected. So I see that as a mandate from the assembly.

Regular meetings to reach regional agreement on a self-government proposal will take place over the coming months.

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“Recent discussions have focused on governance both at the regional or tribal level and at the community level,” Nadli said.

“Programs and services around education, health, language and culture were mentioned [by regional leaders] as priorities for self-government.

But land claims are not completely irrelevant. The DFN Land Use Planning Committee aims to complete a new plan that can be presented to the territorial government by 2025.

Nadli said public forums will continue on a monthly basis as negotiators and leaders provide updates.

During Tuesday’s meeting, negotiators answered questions about how self-government works and the stalemate of previous negotiations.

“Has anyone done a financial analysis of the revenues the Dehcho will need in the future to be sustainable and self-sufficient? asked Rosemary Gill.

“At our next meetings, we will endeavor to consider the financial resources and revenues we will need for a functioning Dehcho government,” Nadli said in his response.

“That’s why continued work on the land use plan is essential,” added Norwegian. “We have identified major areas throughout our territory where we are rich in oil and gas, rich in minerals, rich in timber, there are incredible agricultural opportunities in the Mackenzie Valley…the market is there.

“The potential is there. There’s no doubt that we could hold our own…once that’s sorted out, we could probably go a little beyond that.

The negotiators have promised to announce the date of the next public meeting by early September.

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Self government

Alberta Métis Conclude Historic Assembly Advancing Self-Government

More than 55,000 Métis citizens will vote on the Constitution this fall

Over the weekend, the Métis Nation of alberta held its 94e Annual general meeting at Calgary, where delegates voted overwhelmingly in favor of moving forward with a province-wide ratification vote on a draft constitution for the Métis Nation in alberta.

The draft Constitution was tabled in the Assembly by the MNA Constitution Committee after two and a half years of extensive community engagement that included focus groups, community gatherings, hearings, written comments and a project already released. Additional information on the MNA Constitutional Commission and the engagement process can be found at www.albertametisgov.com.

For generations, our elders, our citizens and our communities have told us that we must opt ​​out of provincial legislation and govern ourselves according to our inherent right to self-government and Métis traditions and laws.“, declared the president of the MNA Audrey Poitras. “With this draft Constitution, we can now implement what Louis Riel and our ancestors fought for: our inherent right to govern ourselves. I look forward to all of our citizens exercising their democratic right to decide whether we will finally adopt our own constitution.”

The resolution directs the MLA to place the final draft constitution of the Métis Government of Otipemisiwak “into the hands of all the citizens of the MLA” and that a province-wide ratification vote including the vote by ballot box, mail and online take place in the fall of 2022. A copy of the full resolution is available on the Member’s website.

Over the coming months, the MNA Constitutional Commission will hold further briefings to present the draft Constitution that will be subject to the province-wide ratification vote. In addition, the MP will undertake a province-wide information campaign to ensure that all of its more than 55,000 citizens are aware of the ratification vote and have the option to vote by ballot box or online voting. .

All citizens are encouraged to update their contact information with the MNA Registry by calling 1-800-267-5844 or visiting this link. This will allow Citizens to update their MLA Registry file and indicate their preference as to how they would like to vote.

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Home rule

Chandler holds Hartke, Orlando on the way to victory; home rule passes for the 11th time in a row

Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke easily leads his opponent in the early results of the Sept. 2 primary election Tuesday night.

Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke and incumbent Alderman Matt Orlando appear headed for re-election in the first results released shortly after 8 p.m. Tuesday night in the city’s primary election.

It also appears that Chandler has once again overwhelmingly approved a self-governance measure that gives the city permission to spend its money as it sees fit rather than being tied down by an outdated spending formula from the State. Prop. 478 has an 88 percent approval in the first batch of ballots counted.

It was expected. Chandler voters had endorsed Home Rule for local budget control 10 consecutive times since 1982.

Final results likely won’t be known for a few days, according to Maricopa County election officials.

Kevin Hartke

Hartke, 66, a Chandler resident for 37 years, has a sizable lead with 77% of the vote in the early results of his race against challenger Ruth Jones, 55, a mortgage loan officer and Chandler political neophyte. She has lived in the city for two years.

Hartke, an associate pastor at Trinity Christian Fellowship, joined the city council in 2008 and served two full terms before being elected mayor in 2018.

Orlando, 66, a 38-year-old resident of the city, has 27 percent of the vote in a tight race for three city council seats.

The field is packed right behind him in the first batch of votes.

Jane Poston, 53, a resident of the city for 13 years, holds 21% of the vote. She is the owner/partner of J2 Media and is a former employee of the Chandler Public Information Office.

She holds a slight advantage over third-placed Angel Encinas, who holds 20% of the vote. Encinas works with community members to provide legal status, employment opportunities, housing, and community services.

Matt Orlando

Darla Gonzalez is fourth in the top results with 17%; Farhana Shifa has 14 percent.

Gonzalez, 56, has been a resident of Chandler for 18 years. She is self-employed at Gonzalez Professional Services and is the Base Manager of the Az Free Enterprise Club.

Shifa, 46, has lived in Chandler for 16 years. She owns The Joy of Fine Arts.

A second round of elections would take place on November 8, if necessary.

Proposition 470, the alternative spending restraint and self-reliance option, was put to voters by the city council, asking for a four-year extension of a measure that voters first approved in 1982. It allows the council to establish the budget according to the specificities of the city. needs in general government, public safety, public works, and utilities, rather than being constrained by the state-mandated spending formula based on the 1979-80 fiscal year established by the Arizona Legislature .

It wouldn’t raise taxes or allow Chandler to spend more than he receives in income.

If approved, Chandler estimates he would be allowed to spend approximately $766,205,118 in 2023-24 (limited to $543,443,438 if Home Rule is not approved), $734,813,629 in 2024-25 ($578,389,413 if not approved), $739,234,393 in 2025-26 ($575,701,116 if not). approved) and $745,992,632 in 2026-2027 ($587,398,668 if not approved).

If the measure fails, the revenue would still be collected, but the city would be prevented from applying it to essential functions, such as police, fire, streets, parks and libraries. This, according to the City, would force it to make drastic cuts in essential services, thus impacting its ability to meet the basic needs of residents.

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Self government

Declaration of Autonomy | Journal-news

Stephen Fedoriw

Berkeley Springs

The Declaration of Independence

We remember this day of July 4, 1776 as a day of fireworks and family celebrations, and that is very good. But as we examine the events of our country of our founding fathers and their writings, we begin to grasp the sacrifice they made of their “lives, fortunes and sacred honor”. And this sacrifice was made for the generations that will follow them. Historians marvel at how America improved law and order during and after the Revolutionary War.

Many other countries after enduring a revolution are wrecked and in disarray. Yet within 35 years America had already begun to rival Britain as the largest country in the world. Our Declaration of Independence indicates the origin of American laws. And yet, our founders understood that good laws are beneficial, good men are better. It is for this reason that our founders emphasized that men of high morality, who knew how to govern themselves, were a benefit to society.

James Madison, the father of the Constitution said, “We have staked the whole future of American civilization, not on the power of government, far from it. We have staked the future of all of our political institutions on the ability of each of us to govern, control and sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.

Robert Charles Winthrop, Speaker of the House of Representatives, 1847-1849, said, “All society must be governed one way or another. The less strict state government they have, the more individual autonomy they must have. The less public or physical right they have, the more they must rely on private moral coercion. Men, in a word, must necessarily be controlled either by a power within them or by a power outside them; either by the word of God, or by the strong arm of men; either by the Bible or by the bayonet.

Our Founding Fathers witnessed the disorder of moral anarchy that the French Revolution brought, with its riots, looters and the burning of its churches. The French abandoned ethics and moral boundaries, which led to the establishment of a military dictator.

Read our Declaration of Independence, examine these words of wisdom, and see that it is moral self-reliance that America needs, not anarchy, rioters, and racial looters. Because our country has disarmed our churches, we are left powerless in the face of mass shootings. As Charles Winthrop said, “Either by the Bible or by the bayonet.”

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Home rule

Home rule, inflation and a peek into outer space – Orlando Sentinel

Joanie Schirm, founding chair of the GEC; Orlando 1994 World Cup Committee Chairman

Last week: CONGRATULATIONS TO NASA: Growing up in Melbourne during the birth of the space age, I closely followed the evolution of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration established in 1958. Emphasizing the peaceful applications of space science, NASA is focused on better understanding our Earth, exploring our Milky Way to unseen galaxies. Stunning first views from the James Webb Space Telescope research mission are already advancing our knowledge of the Big Bang and the birth and death of stars. Coming full circle in his stellar life, Melbourne native, former senator, astronaut and now NASA Administrator Bill Nelson hailed NASA’s greatest achievement in decades, acknowledging the global science team that made it possible .

Look forward: GOOD LUCK, LEE: Congratulations to the Florida Counties Association, representing Florida’s 67 counties in the Legislative Assembly and the Governor’s Office, for selecting Lee Constantine of Seminole County as President. For two decades, Constantine served the Seminole County Commission after serving as a state representative and senator. His passion for the environment is well known. Its dedicated support for “home rule” allows local citizens to retain the maximum opportunity to contribute to the policies, laws and decisions that affect our daily lives. The current overreach of the GOP-led Legislature and Governor has shown that they want to take power, giving us less freedom to govern locally. Good luck, Lee.

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Home rule

Early voting underway for mayor, 3 council seats, home rule measure in Chandler

The first ballots have been mailed for the primary election for Mayor and City Council in Chandler.

Ballots for Chandler’s Aug. 2 primary election for mayor, three council seats and a proposal for how the city can spend its money were mailed Wednesday, July 6 to voters who turned out. registered on the active early voting list.

A second round of elections would take place on November 8, if necessary.

MAYOR

Kevin Hartke
Ruth Jones

Mayor Kevin Hartke is seeking a second term, opposed by Ruth Jones.

Hartke, 66 and a resident of Chandler for 37 years, is an associate pastor at Trinity Christian Fellowship. He joined the city council in 2008 and served two full terms before being elected mayor in 2018.

Jones, 55, a mortgage loan officer, has lived in Chandler for two years.

MUNICIPAL COUNCIL

Matt Orlando
Encinas Angel
Darla Gonzalez
Jane Poston
Farhana Shifa

Five candidates are vying for three seats on the Council. Council members Terry Roe and Rene Lopez, as two-term members, are appointed and must step down. Incumbent Matt Orlando is up for re-election.

Orlando, 66 and a resident of the city for 38 years, is challenged by Angel Encinas, Darla Gonzalez, Jane Poston and Farhana Shifa.

Encinas works with community members to provide legal status, employment opportunities, housing, and community services.

Gonzalez, 56 and a resident of Chandler for 18 years, is self-employed with Gonzalez Professional Services and is the local director of the Az Free Enterprise Club.

Poston, 53 and a resident of the city for 13 years, owner/partner of J2 Media and former employee of the Chandler Public Information Office.

Shifa, 46 and a resident of Chandler for 16 years, owns The Joy of Fine Arts.

Prop. 470, Home Rule

Proposition 470, the alternative option of spending restraint and autonomy, is put to voters by the city council, asking for a four-year extension of a measure that voters first approved in 1982 and which allows the council to establish the budget according to the specificities of the city. needs in general government, public safety, public works, and utilities, rather than being constrained by the state-mandated spending formula based on the 1979-80 fiscal year established by the Arizona Legislature . It wouldn’t raise taxes or allow Chandler to spend more than he receives in income.

Chandler voters have endorsed Home Rule for local budget control 10 times in a row.

If approved, Chandler estimates he would be allowed to spend approximately $766,205,118 in 2023-24 (limited to $543,443,438 if Home Rule is not approved), $734,813,629 in 2024-25 ($578,389,413 if not approved), $739,234,393 in 2025-26 ($575,701,116 if not). approved) and $745,992,632 in 2026-2027 ($587,398,668 if not approved).

If the measure fails, the revenue would still be collected, but the city would be prevented from applying it to essential functions, such as police, fire, streets, parks and libraries. This, the city says, would force it to make drastic cuts to essential services, impacting its ability to meet residents’ basic needs.

The recommended last day to return a ballot is Tuesday, July 26. Ballots can also be dropped off at polling centers or ballot boxes until 7 p.m. on Tuesday, August 2.

Chandler City Hall, 175 S. Arizona Ave., will serve as the voting center Friday, July 22 through Monday, August 1, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

On Election Day, Aug. 2, voters can vote in person or drop off a ballot from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Complete list of voting centers and ballot boxes: locations.maricopa.vote.

Independent voters or voters not registered with a political party can participate in the primary election. They can choose which ballot to receive: the Democratic race, the Republican race, or voting on Chandler’s questions only. The city’s measures will appear on the ballot of both political parties. Independent voters can call Maricopa County Elections at 602-506-1511 to find out how to request a ballot.

Chandler primary election information: chandleraz.gov/elections, City Clerk at 480-782-2181 or Maricopa County Elections at 602-506-1511.

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Self government

Four BC First Nations reach education self-government agreements

SEABIRD ISLAND, BC, July 11, 2022 /CNW/ – At a celebration at Seabird Island today, four First Nations – the Cowichan Tribes, Lil’wat Nation, ʔaq’am and Seabird Island – were recognized and celebrated for reaching self-government agreements government regarding education on their land. Thanks to their school jurisdiction agreements signed with Canadathe four First Nations now have recognized legislative authority over their K-12 education systems, including authority over teacher certification, school certification, graduation requirements, curricula studies and course approvals.

The event is also a celebration of the creation of the First Nations Education Authority (FNEA), which will help participating First Nations build capacity to provide education on First Nations lands. The board of directors of the new FNEA will consist of two directors appointed by each of the participating First Nations.

This achievement is an important step towards realizing the right of First Nations to establish and control their education system and institutions, as affirmed by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and as recognized under section 35 of the Constitution Act 1982.

The Education Jurisdiction Agreements are historic agreements that lay the groundwork for the four participating First Nations to make decisions and pass laws in the best interests of their learners. This will help them exercise control over their education on their land instead of being subject to federal policy changes.

First Nations in British Columbia have been working collectively for more than two decades to advance First Nations control over education through the Education Skills Initiative. The First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC), a political and advocacy organization that represents and works on behalf of First Nations in British Columbia, has provided a wide range of support to First Nations claiming jurisdiction over education.

Quotation

“The affirmation of our own governance in education has been a long journey. With the achievement of jurisdiction over education and our new legislative authority, we are fundamentally changing the system and taking an important step in asserting our rights as Indigenous peoples.
Stephanie Atleo
President of the First Nations Education Authority

“Education Competence aims to provide a culturally relevant and excellent education to ensure that our young people graduate with the knowledge, skills and credentials to thrive in all the opportunities they get. choose for higher learning, employment and life choices. I congratulate all the First Nations who have been involved in the educational jurisdictions process for their strength of vision and their perseverance.
Tyrone McNeilChair of the First Nations Education Steering Committee and Member of Seabird Island First Nation

“Recognition of jurisdiction over First Nations education will have lasting and significant benefits for young people in First Nations schools. I thank the four participating First Nations for their innovative work and look forward to working with the new First Nations Education Authority. .”
Aaron Burgess
President of the Association of First Nations Schools

“All First Nations learners deserve every opportunity to perform at their best. Through the Education Jurisdiction, we have worked in partnership with the First Nations Education Steering Committee and the Government of Canada formally recognize and support First Nations communities in educating and empowering their children and youth through the creation of their own community-led learning. This historic change in education will allow participating First Nations to certify teachers and schools, approve courses and set graduation requirements. »
The Honorable Jennifer Whiteside
Minister of Education and Childcare

“Today is a historic day for learners of British Columbia, and for the ʔaq̓am, Cowichan Tribes, Lil’wat Nation and Seabird Island communities. Control of Indigenous education, led by Indigenous peoples, is essential to ensure they have the tools they need to succeed and stay connected to their culture and language. Congratulations on this achievement in strengthening your identities, culture, languages ​​and heritage through the provision of culturally relevant primary and secondary education.”
The Honorable Marc Miller
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“Signing these Education Skills Agreements will transform the way First Nations students learn, helping them achieve their goals and reach their full potential. The ?aq’am, the Cowichan Tribes, the Lil’wat Nation and Seabird Island and the First Nations Education Steering Committee are leading the way, and they have reached this place of self-determination through their unwavering vision. Congratulations to everyone involved!”
The Honorable Patty Hajdu
Minister of Indigenous Services

Fast facts

  • In 1972, the First Nations of Canada endorsed the Indian Control of Indian Education Policy, promoting an educational approach based on parental responsibility and local control. This was updated in 2010 by the Assembly of First Nations in its Policy Statement on First Nations Control of First Nations Education. BC First Nations continue to strive for full control over First Nations education.
  • Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational system and institutions within the framework of their inherent rights to self-determination and self-government, as affirmed in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and also as recognized and affirmed under Article 35 of the Constitution Act 1982.
  • In 2006 FNESC, British Columbia and Canada signed the Education Jurisdiction Framework Agreement which recognizes the right of BC First Nations to establish and control their own education systems. Canada passed a law in 2006, and British Columbia did the same in 2007, codifying this recognition and paving the way for First Nations to assume jurisdiction.
  • The Education Jurisdiction Initiative is designed to support the exercise of self-government in education by First Nations through enabling legislation and a series of tripartite and bilateral agreements, including the Tripartite Framework Agreement on Education Jurisdiction, standard agreements to be signed by Canada and Participating First Nations, and other agreements between British Columbia and FNEA, FNESC and Participating First Nations.
  • A Participating First Nation (PNP) is a First Nation that has jurisdiction over its education system, which includes the power to:
    • Make educational laws for education within its territory through its chief and council
    • Establish a governance structure either through its chief and council or another governmental authority they establish (e.g. community school authority)
  • In 2021, British Columbia passed legislation to enable cooperation and assistance between the Ministry of Education and Childcare and the FNEA on the regulation of teachers. The agreements are expected to be finalized this summer.
  • The FNEA, created July 1, 2022, will help participating First Nations develop the capacity to provide education on First Nations lands. The FNEA will exercise the powers delegated by the NFPs in the following areas:
    • teacher certificate
    • School certificate
    • Graduation Requirements and Course Approval

Related links
First Nations Education Steering Committee
First Nations Schools Association
Government of Canada

SOURCE First Nations Education Steering Committee

For further information: Jennifer White, Manager, Communications and Events, First Nations Education Steering Committee, Cell: 250-240-2157, Email: [email protected]; Ministry of Education and Child Care, Government Communications and Public Engagement, Province of British Columbia, Phone: 250-356-5963; Renelle Arsenault, Director of Communications, Office of the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Email: [email protected]; CIRNAC Media Relations: Email: [email protected]Phone: 819-934-2302

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Sovereignty

INDIAN DEMAND FOR AUTONOMY: The Tribune India

The Manchester Guardian has done a service of equal value to India and the Empire by sending a special correspondent to that country on a fact-finding mission. The two articles which the correspondent has hitherto contributed to the paper, and extracts from which have now been received in this country, show that he has taken great pains to see men of all shades of view, and to obtain them expressions of opinion. regarding the current situation in India which can be considered fairly representative. In his second letter he says that he has spoken to a few journalists and politicians in Bombay, some of them co-operators and some non-co-operators, and when he asks them what the English government should do, all said India did not want to get what the British thought good of her, but wanted to be allowed to decide for herself what she needed. They suggested a round table, at which all classes and interests in India should be represented, and at which officials should be present to provide information. In our view, this statement of the Indian position requires modification. The Conference should follow and not precede a decision by the British statesman to let India become mistress of her own house, within a time to be specified with her consent, and to grant her a full measure of responsible government, including provincial and fiscal autonomy. freedom, insofar as it may be deemed possible in the circumstances. This is perhaps precisely what the correspondent himself means when he says: – “Asked about what the Conference is likely to propose, most of them, including some non-cooperators, answer: “Autonomy is not immediate and complete. .’ They recognize the need for a transition period, which some estimate at five years, but most at ten years. Few are willing to consider a longer transition period.

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Self government

Roadmap for restoring local self-government in Ukraine

The ongoing large-scale military aggression of the Russian Federation against Ukraine, launched in February 2022, has significantly affected democratic governance in Ukraine at all levels, including the well-advanced process of decentralization reform.

What are the main challenges of the local self-government system identified by the Ukrainian national authorities? How do the authorities plan to deal with this in a long-term perspective? What additional measures are needed to mitigate existing problems? Are the proposed solutions in line with the principles of the European Charter of Local Self-Government?

To answer these and many other questions and in response to a request from the Parliamentary Specialized Committee on Local Self-Government, the Council of Europe’s Center of Expertise for Good Governance has prepared the Policy Opinion on the roadmap for the revival of local autonomy Consequences of the war (CEGG/PAD(2022)3 of June 30, 2022).

This comprehensive roadmap was designed by the National Council for Recovery under the Presidency of Ukraine and covers a large number of areas of social and economic life. It contains a specific sub-chapter devoted to the development of local self-government, aimed at achieving a list of four key reform objectives.

The political opinion has been prepared within the framework of the Council of Europe program “Strengthening decentralization and public administration reform in Ukraine”. Its recommendations will be further implemented in the framework of the joint initiative on “Good democratic governance in Ukraine: moving forward in a post-war context” launched on 29 June 2022 by the Council of Europe and its national partners in Ukraine: Committee, Ministry of Community and Territory Development, and the Central Election Commission.

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Sovereignty

Amendment to the Shíshálh Nation Self-Government Act

The House of Commons voted unanimously to remove the “patriarchal” requirement for federal approval for amendments to the nation’s constitution.

An amendment to the self-government agreement between the Shíshálh Nation and Canada passed unanimously in the House of Commons on June 22, slipping just before the House adjourned for the summer.

But behind that moment – ​​that vote – were years of work.

The first chord

Thirty-six years ago, the Shíshálh Nation was the first First Nation to sign a self-government agreement with Canada. Several autonomy agreements would come after this, each learning from the last, but that of shíshálh was the first. Many of the clauses of this agreement were archaic, copied and pasted from Indian Act and the Constitution, Warren Paull told the nation shíshálh hiwus (chief) coastal journalist, and needed modernization.

The new legislation clarifies that the nation can change its own constitution without federal government oversight or approval – which is included in subsequent self-government agreements.

“It gives the nation much greater authority over things that only concern the nation,” Patrick Weiler, MP for West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea, told Sky Country.

Until last month, legislative changes had to go not only through a minister, but also through the Governor in Council, for approval. “It was not only a very cumbersome and time-consuming process, but it’s also paternalistic, and arguably insulting to have to ask for this approval,” Weiler said.

The legislation also establishes, and this is essential, a cadastre separate from the Indian Act Reserve Land Registry. “We have been very good at acquiring land but wanted to add it to our current land holdings under 91 (24) [of the Constitution Act, 1867]”, Paull said. “We can sell it, and it will become provincial land again, but while we own it, it becomes a 91(24) addition to the land reserves.”

The legislative amendment also confirms that the nation has the power to legislate over social and welfare services, including child and family services.

Weiler also says that this updated legislation now means the Shíshálh language can be used in governance.

Foundation agreement

The recent history of this agreement for Paull dates back to the historic Reconciliation Baseline Agreement signed between the nation and the province in 2018, which covered land use planning processes, shíshálh land resource consultation and more. Again.

“If you want to have a conversation with the province and sign a groundbreaking agreement, there are certain things like land transfers that require federal approval and commitment,” Paull said. “So we knew we had to get there.”

The nation spoke with then-Attorney General Jodi Wilson Raybould and “pretty much everyone under the sun on this end of the world,” Paull said.

People from Ottawa and Victoria were there. “It’s one of those really good news things that everybody wanted to get engaged to. It’s not often that you have all the parties in the provincial and federal government wanting to work with you on these things,” Paull said. .

Even at that, the amendment took years.

eleventh hour

This latest round of negotiations began in 2020. The amendment went to a referendum for nation members last October, with more than 80 percent in favor, Paull said. But he still had to go through Ottawa.

The unanimity with which legislation passed in the House of Commons is rare, Weiler said.
They first introduced Bill S-10 in the Senate, which it passed in one day, a week before the summer recess. It took a coordinated effort between Weiler, Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller, as well as the Parliamentary Secretary, working through concerns and questions from other parties and caucuses (including a conversation in French between Weiler and the Bloc Quebec) – to pass the bill. It wasn’t until the early morning of June 22 that things clicked. The law was passed this afternoon. Had the legislation not passed unanimously, it would have been sent to committees, debates and three more readings.

“It’s a very significant change,” Weiler said. “And that’s cause for celebration.”

“It took a lot of effort, a lot of political will,” Paull said. He paid tribute to Marc Miller, Weiler, MP Nicholas Simons and former ministers and politicians who came to the table in support.

However, this is not the end of the negotiations.

After the founding agreement was finalized, negotiations between the nation and Canada were divided into three sections.

The first section was the electoral cycle. Prior to 2019, only members of the nation who lived in shíshálh territory could vote or stand for election. Since 2019, non-resident members can also vote and stand for election.

The second clause is this recent amendment.

The third component deals with the reconciliation table and negotiation on land, tax, natural resource management and wildlife issues.

They still have to sit on those issues, but are preparing for it, Paull said.

For people who live and breathe this stuff, this amendment is major, Paull said. “For the others, the members say it was about time. Long overdue.

With this possibility of amending the constitution, Paull says there are plenty of community members who want to get into this discussion soon – it’s a matter of deciding what to do first.

“All these conversations are happening now.

“And the community is going to have to be consulted on all of this. Because it is their constitution.

“Now we have to have a tough conversation about what’s next,” Paull said. “Because now we want to expand our influence outside of our traditional postage stamp lands and out into the wider community by becoming a working model of governance. So that requires a lot of discussion.

“Now is a great time to be a member of the shíshálh nation,” Paull said. “I think we’re going to lead the way with the rest of Canada and show Canada how it’s done.

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Home rule

Georgia Supreme Court spaceport case pits 1st Amendment against county home rule

Georgia’s Supreme Court is set to hear a case next month that First Amendment experts say could create significant hurdles for voters who want to use public initiative to rein in their local elected officials.

It’s the latest installment in Camden County’s long-running effort to build a spaceport on the Georgian coast. The county is challenging a clause in the Georgia Constitution that paved the way for a special election that blocks the purchase of 4,000 acres near the Atlantic Ocean where Camden officials are planning the controversial rocket launch spaceport.

Over a two-year period, Camden residents secured the signatures of more than 10% of registered voters needed to put the referendum on the ballot.

And in the March 8 election, voters rejected a resolution allowing the county to enter into the land deal with Union Carbide Corp., as residents objected to a still-running spaceport tab that now tops $11 million. dollars. Meanwhile, opponents continue to complain about the possibility that rockets launched from the spaceport could explode, raining debris on federally protected areas and 40 private homes on Cumberland Island.

Clare Norins, director of the University of Georgia Law School’s First Amendment Clinic, wrote in a friend of the court brief that the county is unable to provide evidence in support of his view that the county’s authority to conduct business is seriously threatened by giving voters the power of a referendum that allows the public to air their grievances through protected political speech.

Since the majority of county laws that affect residents are passed by the county and other local officials, as opposed to the Georgia General Assembly, the referendum offers residents the opportunity to veto measures such as Camden Spaceport, where many residents felt they were being ignored as county commissioners went on an extended quest to launch rockets off the Georgian coast toward sensitive barrier islands, Norins wrote.

The Supreme Court has scheduled a hearing for August 23 in the case.

“The invalidation of this direct democracy safety valve built into our State Constitution will rob not only the people of Camden County, but the people of Georgia’s 159 counties of their ability to hold their county commissioners accountable more than ‘once every four years,’ the legal brief said. “Although county commissioners are few in number, they wield enormous power to legislatively affect the lives of their constituents.”

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Camden officials’ foray into commercial space exploration began in 2014 and five years later the Federal Aviation Administration granted the spaceport operator license for up to 12 launches per year. The license is dependent on the county closing on lands held by Union Carbide. Each individual launch would require state and federal regulatory approval.

As legal battles unfold, county officials ‌seek‌ ‌investors‌ and attract business for a project they believe will be an economic driver for the region.

The Association County Commissioners of Georgia sides with Camden officials, who are members of the lobbying organization. The organization says the public initiative clause was never intended to apply to land deals.

Camden argues that the state constitution ‌prohibits residents from revoking county resolutions. Instead, county attorneys say, the real estate contract falls under the state autonomy provision, which grants counties the power to enact local laws.

In a related case from 2020, Glynn County was successfully blocked two state senate bills that called for a special election to abolish the county police department and return control to the‌ ‌‌ ‌sheriff.

If the state high court rules against the county, ‌a recurring cycle of petitions could be triggered against county and city governments, which would be ‌‌‌contrary to the state constitution which establishes the ground rules of government. , lawyers for the counties association wrote on May 16.

“Such an outcome would have a dramatic impact on the 159 county members of the ACCG, both operationally and cost-wise: counties would have to provide funding for staff, equipment and venues to holding this new class of county-wide special elections.”

The county association and Camden officials also cite a 1998 state case in which the Georgia Supreme Court ruled against a group of residents and business owners who were trying to stop city leaders from Claxton, in southern Georgia, to close the railroad crossings. They are asking the judges hearing the Camden case to follow suit in the Kemp v. City of Claxton case by giving the constitutional county domicile rule the same weight as the statutory municipal domicile rule.

“The feasibility of Kemp’s reasoning is even more evident in the light of our system of government: if citizens are dissatisfied with the measures taken by their elected, they can (and often find) their remedy by voting those elected removed from office,” the county association’s legal argument reads.

The Supreme Court case isn’t the only legal tangle holding up the planned spaceport. The Southern Environmental Law Center, One Hundred Miles, and the National Parks Conservation Association are suing the Federal Aviation Administration in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. In a lawsuit filed in May, environmental groups say the agency has failed to adequately study the potential environmental damage that approved small rockets could cause since ‌spaceport’s previous plans envisioned SpaceX-sized launches.

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Home rule

Colorado self-governing municipalities sue state over sales tax exemption law

On Friday, five self-governing municipalities sued the state of Colorado over a new law they say imposes state control over their taxing authority.

“The power to collect sales and use taxes to generate revenue is at the heart of self-governing municipalities and a core function of municipal operations,” Denver City Attorney Kristin Bronson said in a statement. “HB 22-1024 illegally infringes on the Constitution of Colorado, and residents of self-governing municipalities have the full right of autonomy in local and municipal affairs.”

Besides Denver, the plaintiffs are Boulder, Commerce City, Pueblo and Westminster.

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The state and some local governments exempt construction and building materials related to public schools, among other public works, from sales and use taxes. The new law in question, which Gov. Jared Polis signed in April, extended the exemption from collecting sales tax for construction materials from public schools to self-governing cities. Prior to the law, self-governing cities could still levy sales and use taxes on these building materials.

“For decades, self-governing cities in Colorado have wielded this power to levy and collect sales and use taxes on goods and services, regardless of whether the state levies or collects sales and use taxes. of use on the same goods and services,” the complaint reads.

Denver collects about $2 million to $4 million a year in these taxes, according to the lawsuit filed in Denver District Court. Pueblo raises between $3 million and $4 million per year and Commerce City raises about $1.5 million per year.

The plaintiffs argue that the law, which goes into effect Aug. 10, violates the state Constitution and that the state legislature cannot prevent self-governing municipalities from exercising their taxing power. They are asking for a court order that will stop the law from going into effect.

2022-06-30 16-24-30 Complaint

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Self government

In West Virginia v. EPA, Supreme Court rules in favor of self-government

It’s been a hectic month for Supreme Court rulings. Monumental rulings on life issues, the Second Amendment and religious liberty have now been followed by West Virginia vs. EPAa move that has major implications for vetting runaway regulators and for the economy.

In short, the Supreme Court close the ability of the Environmental Protection Agency to completely revamp Americans’ electricity sources around a sweeping climate agenda based on the agency’s broad interpretation of a narrow Clean Air Act provision.

In doing so, the Supreme Court made it harder for other regulators to get away with similar power grabs.

To appreciate the implications of this decision, first consider the things you did this morning to prepare for the day. Your phone or clock alarm has gone off. The shower was just the right temperature. Your coffee was hot and the cream was cold. Your clothes are more likely to match due to a well-lit room. And you may have turned on a computer to start the work day, all because of electricity.

Americans are extremely lucky to often take everything that happens behind the scenes for granted when they plug something into an outlet. Whether you think about it or not, energy is essential to health, well-being and Economic opportunityand he was a driver in the dramatic decrease mortality and extreme poverty over the last century.

This potential for productivity and growth of individuals, families, businesses, communities and entire economies is why energy policy matters and why high energy prices matter. corrosive.

Now imagine if a single federal agency of unelected bureaucrats had a determining influence on the composition of the electricity sector. This agency would not only influence the power plants, but the economy. This was the occasion for the Supreme Court hearing in West Virginia v. EPA.

The case

At stake in this case was the so-called Clean Energy Plan and its power to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from the entire electricity sector. The Clean Power Plan established mandates to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and a cap-and-trade system designed to shut down coal and natural gas plants in favor of renewables.

Almost 60% of Americans’ electricity today comes from natural gas and coal-fired power plants, which emit greenhouse gases.

In other words, the EPA has put itself squarely in the position of setting energy and economic policy under the guise of environmental policy while enjoying near absolute power to do so.

One of the plan’s many consequences was that the EPA completely ignored important considerations, such as network reliability, affordability, consumer choice, and state responsibilities. Instead, the EPA’s sole interest was to regulate the grid to achieve then-President Barack Obama’s radical climate agenda of demanding a transition from conventional energy to politically correct renewable energy.

If the court on Thursday upheld near-unlimited authority for the EPA to regulate the network, EPA Biden was set to follow up with its own version as the centerpiece of President Joe Biden’s unilateral commitment to the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Heritage Foundation modeling estimates trillions of dollars in damage to the entire economy and to American families, and with no environmental benefit, whether as a result of the of the Obama administration Clean Power Plan or a possible Biden version. (The Daily Signal is the medium of the Heritage Foundation.)

In this sense, the court’s 6 to 3 decision in West Virginia v. EPA is very good news for electricity consumers across the country, who are now protected against the EPA’s unlimited and inexplicable interference in their electricity bills.

The overview

However, in many ways, protecting against these consequences is an important but secondary issue to whether Congress even gave the EPA the power to do so.

The court correctly determined that the EPA has gone well beyond its role by creating for itself an authority to regulate the electricity sector, and with it a major component of the bedrock of the American economy.

In other words, how the EPA tried to regulate greenhouse gas emissions mattered a lot.

That’s why people on both sides of the aisle and of opposing beliefs about global warming have opposed the EPA’s regulatory attempts.

When the Obama administration first released the Clean Power Plan, Laurence Tribe – Obama’s former law professor at Harvard –eloquently describes the deep issues with the rule:

At its core, the question the Clean Power Plan asks is whether the EPA is bound by the rule of law and must operate within the framework established by the United States Constitution. …

Accordingly, the EPA gamble would mean that citizens give up their right to be represented by an accountable and responsive government that accords with the assumptions of federalism.

The tribe called it a “sleight of hand [that] offends democratic principles by avoiding political transparency and accountability.

What West Virginia v. EPA reminds us is that America is not run by an irresponsible king in the White House and his regulatory officials, but rather by elected American officials in partnership with the states.

This expressed will is simply implemented by the executive power, and not the other way around.

Do you have an opinion on this article ? To chime in, please email [email protected] and we’ll consider posting your edited remarks in our regular “We Hear You” column. Don’t forget to include the URL or title of the article as well as your name and city and/or state.

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Self government

OPINION: Juneteenth should reinforce that we are all capable of self-government

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. Source: Library of Congress

By Ray Nothstine
Carolina Journal Opinion Editor

Slavery in the United States ended in practice at the end of the Civil War. We can find the ideals of equality in our Declaration of Independence, which says, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator…” Indeed, Christian influence and revivals in America have strongly reinforced the idea that we are all made in the image of God, creating a culture ripe for fuller freedoms and emancipation.

Yet America has often struggled to put into practice this simple truth contained in our Declaration. The rise of the American civil rights movement has helped raise awareness to live up to our founding ideals. Civil rights leaders frequently borrowed founding words and documents because they possessed great recognition and authority with the public – especially given that they wanted to persuade white households. The “Let Liberty Ring” repetition of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is a clear reference to the Liberty Bell.

Fortunately, just as the civil rights movement drew inspiration from its founders, we can learn from one of most significant moral movements. The obvious lesson is equality before the law and human dignity, but the idea of ​​autonomy or self-government follows directly from this. Our founding documents give us the principles and the dignity of self-government. Unfortunately, unlike any other era in our past, many Americans are struggling to fully embrace self-government.

The American Civil Rights Movement, often referred to as the Second American Revolution, faced entrenched prejudices and the idea that some were basically meant to be serfs.

African Americans demanded change, and many of those changes were to be fully integrated into the day-to-day practice of self-government, including the right to vote where previously prohibited in large pockets of the South, and to end segregation and discrimination based on race. .

It was highly divisive as the movement publicly challenged traditions and laws, but supported through peaceful protests and the art of nonviolence. One of the striking characteristics of the movement is raw courage. An anecdote from the Reverend Fred Shuttleworth, the hero of the Birmingham campaign, provides an excellent example. Reprinted in 2011 New York Times obituary are these words about Shuttlesworth:

In one instance, on Christmas Eve 1956, he survived an attack in which six sticks of dynamite exploded outside his parsonage bedroom as he lay in bed. “The wall and floor were blown away,” Ms. McWhorter wrote, “and the mattress was lifted into the air, supporting Shuttlesworth like a magic carpet.”

When he attempted to enroll his children in an all-white school in 1957, Klansmen attacked him with bicycle chains and brass knuckles. When a doctor treating his head injuries marveled that he had not suffered a concussion, Mr Shuttlesworth famously replied: “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a tough city, so he gave me a hard head.”

The most important aspect of the civil rights movement is that it helped to awaken a deeper moral culture in America. The federal government could no longer ignore discrimination, especially during the Cold War era when the nation’s image and credibility came under increasing scrutiny. Yet ultimately, the change in racial discrimination had to come from the heart of the human person.

The ordained calls for justice and freedom – backed by the moral authority of foundation and scripture – are being met today with the mounting violence and chaos we see in the news too often centered on ideological objectives and not on first principles. If we are to improve our experience of self-government, these are the kinds of ideals we must embrace: virtue, order, respect for the rule of law, and a peaceful transition of power. Like the civil rights movement, we must be grounded in higher truths.

While America has faltered at many times due to racism and internal violence, we are still the greatest country on earth that has expanded freedom more than any other nation in history. Helping to reclaim these truths – including the Juneteenth Principles – can make us a nation where self-reliance not only endures but thrives.

Ray Nothstine is an editor of the Carolina Journal and a Second Amendment fellow at the John Locke Foundation.

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Sovereignty

Royal Assent for the Anishinabek Nation Self-Government Act

The Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement is now in effect.

Bill S-10, the first self-government agreement of its kind in Ontario, received Royal Assent in Parliament on June 23, 2022.

Officials say the legislation will build on the work of the Anishinabek Nation to help them achieve their inspiring vision of a better future for their communities.

“We are pleased to see that Parliament unanimously supports our governance aspirations,” said Chief Scott McLeod of Nipissing First Nation. “He recognizes that we have the right and the ability to decide important issues ourselves, like who our people are. This is just another step on our journey to full autonomy.

Ottawa says the agreement represents another important step in renewing relationships, closing socio-economic gaps and promoting greater prosperity now and in the future.

“Canada continues to work to renew nation-to-nation relationships and advance self-determination, with Indigenous partners like the Anishinabek Nation,” said Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations. “We will continue to support agreements created by Indigenous communities, for Indigenous communities, so they can achieve their own visions of success.

The agreement, which was signed in April 2022, recognizes Anishinabek control over their governments and law-making powers in four key areas:

  • direction selection
  • citizenship
  • language and culture
  • government operations

The Nipissing First Nation was one of the signatory first nations.

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Home rule

There’s No Place Like Home (RULE) – Sedona.Biz


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By Tommy Acosta

Sigh. How many times do I have to repeat myself? house rulerules!

No one wants to hear the phrase No welcome rule for that implies that one has no right to govern one’s house.

It sits in the unconscious and disrupts the concept of one’s ability to rule the home.

And then there is the word “imposed” as in State-Imposed Limitation of Expenditure (SIEL).

Who the hell wants the state to impose anything on our city? Besides, who wants someone to impose anything on them, period!

To impose means “to force (something unwelcome or unknown) to be accepted or put in place”.

And the synonyms are even worse: impose, force, push, inflict, obstruct, press, incite.

The concept is unpleasant for any lover of freedom.

Yes, SIEL removes council’s right to self-approve expenditures and eliminates local control over expenditures not addressed in the budget, requiring citizens to vote to approve additional expenditures.

But then what?

SEIL is cumbersome, expensive and requires the board to spend money in a timely manner should it become necessary.

SIEL supporters believe the City is spending money frivolously and hope to limit the city’s ability to make its own budget decisions by eliminating its right to do so within state-imposed limitations, forcing the advice to put all uncovered additional expenses in the budget for public vote, even if the public does not vote on the city budget themselves…a waste of time and money.

They say it’s necessary to control the council and win back the citizens’ vote, but they forget that they don’t have a vote on the main budget either. They never had that right in the first place. It’s like trying to close the barn door after the horse has excreted.

Even if the promoters are right on the advice, the vernacular of No welcome rule denies them.

The key is to elect board members who reflect the will of the people and trust them to do the right thing. Period. No need to give up local control over our money.

No welcome rule rubs against the grain of freedom like metallic chalk on a glass blackboard while the term house rule creates all sorts of fuzzy feelings when you say it or think about it.

Ah! house rule. Isn’t it nice? The sweetness of the hearth. My house is my castle. Nothing beats the house and all that jazz.

SEIL supporters set to lose as voters huddle against house rule once again.

In the opinion of SEIL supporters, the council is populated by individuals who push small, selfish projects and keep the wool in the public eye.

Maybe in Washington but not here in Sedona. I can’t imagine any of our board members taking advantage of their position.

Throw the term “State-imposed Limit spending” in your head. The word imposed should offend any self-respecting Republican or Conservative the wrong way.

Imposed? Please. The state should not have the power to impose anything on our right of local control over our budget.

Even Democrats and Liberals would find the term repugnant. Ugh!

The effort to impose the state-imposed spending cap on the people of Sedona will fail miserably, just as it has before.

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Sovereignty

Canada and Shíshálh Nation Mark Royal Assent of Historic Self-Government Legislation

OTTAWA, ON, June 24, 2022 /CNW/ – The Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, and hiwus Warren Paul of the shíshálh nation, announced that Bill S-10, which modernizes from Canada recognition of self-government for the Shishalh Nation, received Royal Assent in Parliament on June 23, 2022.

This legislation, both symbolically and concretely, transforms the relationship between Canada and the shishalh nation. The bill updates the 1986 law, removing the anglicized name and changing to Shíshálh Nation Self-Government Act.

Other changes include:

  • Harmonize the Self-Government Act with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,
  • remove antiquated oversight provisions that are not required under modern self-government agreements,
  • affirming legislative powers over social and welfare services, including child and family services for all members of the Shíshálh Nation, and
  • allowing the establishment of a new land registry for the registration of interests in shíshálh lands, as an alternative to the Indian Act Reserve land register.

Canada is committed to working with Indigenous partners to implement their inherent right to self-determination and support their visions of a better future for their communities.

This legislation will build on the work of the Shíshálh Nation to help them achieve their inspiring visions of a better future for their citizens. This represents another important step in renewing our nation-to-nation relationship and the self-determination of the shishalh nation.

Quotation

“I want to acknowledge that this legislation is the result of years of work by the shíshálh nation and commend them for the results of their perseverance and hard work. With these amendments, Canada take positive steps to support the self-determination of the shíshálh nation.”

The Honorable Marc Miller
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“This is an important day in the history of our nation. The changes to the law are helping to reset our nation-to-nation relationship and seek further reconciliation. Shishalh has been a leader for many decades. We let’s continue to show how Indigenous self-determination can dramatically improve the lives of Nation members while promoting economic growth in the greater community.”

Hi Warren Paul of the shishalh nation

Fast facts

  • In 1986, the shíshálh nation became the first indigenous nation Canada achieve self-government under the Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act.
  • For three years, Canada also worked with the shíshálh nation on amendments to their self-government law.

Related links

Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act (SC 1986, c. 27)

Canada and Anishinabek First Nations sign historic self-government agreement

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SOURCE Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

For further information: Media may contact: Justine Leblanc, Press Secretary, Office of the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Email: [email protected]; CIRNAC Media Relations: Email: [email protected]Phone: 819-934-2302

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Home rule

DC Elected Its Own Mayors Under Home Rule Before Congress Intervened

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Tuesday’s primary elections in DC mark nearly half a century since Congress extended home rule to the district in 1973. But there was an earlier, mostly forgotten chapter when local residents — some of between them, at least – voted in local elections until Congress shot them. immediately in the 1870s.

In 1820, Congress amended the DC charter to allow white men who owned property to vote for mayor, and it lifted the property requirement in 1848. As a young congressman, Abraham Lincoln drafted a bill to end slavery in the district, but in an early nod to self-rule, he made the legislation conditional on gaining the approval of a majority of white male residents. (Women did not gain the right to vote until the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920.)

DC’s election is a status quo referendum against the Liberal reshuffle

The beginning of the end of the district’s home rule probably came in 1867, when Congress made it significantly more democratic by extending the vote to black men in Washington. President Andrew Johnson, an opponent of black enfranchisement, vetoed the bill, but both houses of Congress overrode it by wide margins at the height of Reconstruction. As Sen. Charles Sumner (R-Mass.) hopefully said, DC was to be “an example for the whole country, and especially for the South.”

Testifying in favor of a DC state bill before the US House Oversight Committee last year, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) described the local government that followed the Black Emancipation as a Brief Success Story:

The city’s biracial government desegregated city bureaucracy, provided jobs for a burgeoning black middle class, implemented massive public works projects, and supported the expansion of what became the best black public school system. from the country. Yet that very success sparked a backlash from white conservatives and business leaders who persuaded Congress to back out of biracial democracy.

After the Civil War ended in 1865, radical Republicans in Congress pushed through civil rights measures, including the 14th Amendment, which granted citizenship to former slaves, and the 15th Amendment, which granted black men citizenship. right to vote – three years after the extension of this right. direct current

When Matthew Gault Emery, the city’s last mayor of this period, took office in 1870, he inherited a government that had accumulated large debts. While criticizing the extravagant spending of his predecessors, Emery announced that more spending would be needed to deal with debt and fund public works projects. He built schools and cleared the streets of pigs, goats and geese.

The interracial romance that stunned Washington – twice! — in 1867

At the time, Congress was seeking to undermine the domestic regime, including a proposal to make the city a territory, which Emery, unsurprisingly, opposed.

“If the people of the district are not able to govern themselves, the people’s government will be seen as a failure in the national capital. I am not ready to make such an admission,” Emery said. Congress voted for the proposal anyway, and in 1871 President Ulysses S. Grant signed the bill into law.

The resulting hybrid form of government significantly eroded local control, with the president appointing a new governor and legislative council, while residents could vote for members of a new House of Delegates and for a delegate without the right to vote. vote in the United States House. But it didn’t last long: Congress abolished this system in 1874 after a congressional investigation found cost overruns, untendered contracts, and other problems under the head of the Board of Works. public appointed by the president, Alexander Shepherd.

“Alexander ‘Boss’ Shepherd’s massive public works projects had bankrupted Washington’s short-lived territorial government elected by black and white voters,” wrote Harry Jaffe and Tom Sherwood in their 1994 book, “Dream City : Race, Power, and the Decline”. from Washington, D.C. »

In its place, Congress proposed a temporary plan for the city to be run by three commissioners appointed by the president.

The Nation, a magazine founded by abolitionists in 1865, condemned the abolition of home rule, writing: “Under this bill there remains no vestige of popular municipal administration: aldermen, town councillors, mayors , boards of directors, school boards, police boards, primaries, conventions, everything is swept away, and the whole government is handed over to three men, appointed by a foreign authority, responsible not to their fellow citizens, but to the president and the president. Senate.

In 1878, Congress—which was now divided after the Southern Democrats returned—made this system permanent.

Haiti paid reparations to slavers. Just like Washington, D.C.

“The men of the district, white and black, rich and poor, lost their right to vote. They wouldn’t have cast another meaningful vote for a century,” wrote Chris Myers Asch and George Derek Musgrove in their 2017 book, “Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital.”

If there was any doubt about the role race played in the denial of autonomy less than a decade after black men won the vote, a U.S. senator from Alabama and former Confederate general named John Tyler Morgan made the link explicit. In the Senate in 1890, he compared Congress’s decision to abolish self-government in DC to the slaughter of animals in Kansas to prevent the spread of disease affecting livestock.

Sen. John Ingalls (R-Kan.) continued the metaphor: “Burn down the barn to get rid of the rats.

“Yes, burning the barn to get rid of the rats,” Morgan replied, explaining, “The rats being the black people and the barn being the government of the District of Columbia.”

Morgan, a plantation owner, said that after black people “flooded” into Washington, Congress had no choice but to strip the vote of everyone in DC:

Faced with this influx of black people from surrounding states, the Senate and House of Representatives, in order to preserve property rights and administrative decency in the central government of the United States here around the very walls of the Capitol, have deemed it necessary to disenfranchise every man in the District of Columbia, whatever may have been his reputation or character or property holdings, in order thus to get rid of that charge of black suffrage which has been inundated upon them.

Nearly 70 years later, DC residents won the right to vote in presidential elections after the 23rd Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1961. But it wasn’t until Christmas Eve in 1973 that President Richard M. Nixon – plagued by the Watergate scandal – signed a law giving DC the power of the house that Washingtonians could vote for leaders in their own city.

“As the nation approaches the 200th anniversary of its founding, it is especially appropriate to assure those who live in our capital city the rights and privileges long enjoyed by most of their countrymen,” Nixon said in a statement.

The president said he voted for a self-government bill as a congressman in 1948 and called himself a “longtime supporter of self-government for the District of Columbia,” although a Washington Post article at the time said the White House had not actively lobbied for the bill.

The following year, the city’s president-appointed mayor, Walter E. Washington, became DC’s first modern elected mayor. He was sworn in on January 2, 1975, by Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

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Self government

Juneteenth should reinforce that we are all capable of self-government

Slavery in the United States ended in practice at the end of the Civil War. We can find the ideals of equality in our Declaration of Independence, who said, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator…” Indeed, Christian influence and revivals in America have strongly reinforced the idea that we are all created in the image of God, creating a culture ripe for fuller freedoms and emancipation.

Yet America has often struggled to put into practice this simple truth contained in our Declaration. The rise of the American civil rights movement has helped raise awareness to live up to our founding ideals. Civil rights leaders frequently borrowed founding words and documents because they possessed great recognition and authority with the public – especially given that they wanted to persuade white households. The “Let Liberty Ring” repetition of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is a clear reference to the Liberty Bell.

Fortunately, just as the civil rights movement draws inspiration from the founders, we can learn from one of America’s most important moral movements. The obvious lesson is equality before the law and human dignity, but the idea of ​​autonomy or self-government follows directly from this. Our founding documents give us the principles and the dignity of self-government. Unfortunately, unlike any other era in our past, many Americans are struggling to fully embrace self-government.

The American civil rights movement, often referred to as the second American revolution, came up against entrenched prejudices and the idea that some were essentially destined to be serfs.

African Americans demanded change, and many of those changes were to be fully integrated into the day-to-day practice of self-government, including the right to vote where previously prohibited in large pockets of the South, and to end segregation and discrimination based on race. .

It was highly divisive as the movement publicly challenged traditions and laws, but supported through peaceful protests and the art of nonviolence. One of the striking characteristics of the movement is raw courage. An anecdote from the Reverend Fred Shuttleworth, the hero of the Birmingham campaign, provides an excellent example. Reprinted in 2011 New York Times obituary are these words about Shuttlesworth:

In one instance, on Christmas Eve 1956, he survived an attack in which six sticks of dynamite exploded outside his parsonage bedroom as he lay in bed. “The wall and floor were blown away,” Ms. McWhorter wrote, “and the mattress was lifted into the air, supporting Shuttlesworth like a magic carpet.”

When he attempted to enroll his children in an all-white school in 1957, Klansmen attacked him with bicycle chains and brass knuckles. When a doctor treating his head injuries marveled that he hadn’t suffered a concussion, Mr Shuttlesworth famously replied: “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a tough city, so he gave me a hard head.”

The most important aspect of the civil rights movement is that it helped to awaken a deeper moral culture in America. The federal government could no longer ignore discrimination, especially during the Cold War era, when the nation’s image and credibility came under increasing scrutiny. Yet ultimately, the change in racial discrimination had to come from the heart of the human person.

The ordained calls for justice and freedom – backed by the moral authority of foundation and scripture – are being met today with the mounting violence and chaos we see in the news too often centered on ideological objectives and not on first principles. If we are to improve our experience of self-government, these are the kinds of ideals we must embrace: virtue, order, respect for the rule of law, and a peaceful transition of power. Like the civil rights movement, we must be grounded in higher truths.

While America has faltered at many times due to racism and internal violence, we are still the greatest country in the world that has expanded freedom more than any other nation in history. Helping to rediscover these truths – including the principles of Juneteenth – can make us a nation where self-reliance not only keep on going but prosperous.

Ray Nothstine is an editor of the Carolina Journal and a Second Amendment fellow at the John Locke Foundation.

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Home rule

Scottish independence: “home rule” should be considered, says Labor MSP

Alex Rowley, who represents Midland Scotland and Fife in the Scottish Parliament, said “all options” should be on the table, including devo max alongside yes and no options.

He told the Herald on Sunday that Scotland was in a “constitutional impasse” which was unsustainable.

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The chances of the Scottish government winning the referendum tribunal battle are ‘pretty slim’, according to…

Scottish independence supporters hold a march and rally outside the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. Photo by Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty

“It translates into bad government, rewards political parties for maintaining divisions, and so we have to find a way forward and fix it,” he said.

Mr Rowley said the division and healing of the nation could not be solved by ‘telling 50 per cent of the population that they were wrong’.

“The way forward must be an open, civil debate that looks at the issues and has all the options on the table,” he said.

“My own view is that the ‘home rule’ option should be considered part of the debate, but regardless, the significant and material change since 2014 means that the same binary choice is not more on the table.”

Party leader Anas Sarwar has always ruled out backing a second referendum and accused Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon of “pitting Scots against Scots”.

A Scottish Labor spokesperson said: “In the election, Nicola Sturgeon promised her priority would be our recovery from Covid. But, true to form, she returned to the politics of divisiveness and Scottish versus Scottish opposition.

“This is all a deliberate attempt to distract from his failures.

“Scottish Labor MSPs consistently point to the failure of his government to use the powers it already has to deal with the cost of living crisis, the pressures on our health services, the lack of action on our gap growing in education and failures in transport

“The next electoral contest in Scotland will not be a referendum – it will be a general election. It is an opportunity for change.

The SNP said Mr Rowley should change his ‘broken record’.

Rona MacKay told the Herald on Sunday that “nobody can trust” Scottish Labor to keep their word.

The Strathkelvin and Bearsden MSP said: ‘Scottish Labor made the same vow to Scotland in 2014 and then broke that promise.

“No one can trust them to keep their word this time.

“And no amount of constitutional tinkering would protect Scotland from Brexit disaster or the Tory-created cost of living crisis.

“The only way for Scotland to escape the corrosive control of Westminster is with the full powers of independence.

“However, Alex Rowley clearly recognizes Scotland’s right to choose its own future in a referendum, so he should demand that his boss, Anas Sarwar, abandon his Donald Trump policy of denying clear democratic election results delivered. by the people of this country.”

Constitutional expert Aileen McHarg, professor of public law and human rights at Durham University, said the chances of the Scottish government winning a court battle over a second independence referendum are “pretty slim “.

The comments come after Ms Sturgeon launched her new campaign for independence in Edinburgh on Tuesday, with preparations underway to hold another referendum in October 2023.

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Home rule

The Home Rule Music Festival carries on the spirit of Black Fire Records

In the 1970s, Washington-based Black Fire Records was both an incubator and reliquary of DC’s African-American music and culture and a living symbol of the Black Power and Black Consciousness movements. Charvis Campbell wanted to celebrate it.

” We had to Something in the spirit of Black Fire,” said Campbell, owner of Petworth’s HR Records and head of its adjacent nonprofit, the Home Rule Music and Film Preservation Foundation. To start, he invited Richmond saxophonist James “Plunky” Branch – who co-founded Black Fire with local jazz DJ Jimmy “Black Fire” Gray (who died in 1999) and fronted a jazz band called The Oneness of Juju for the label. — to perform in DC in 2021.

“I was so in love with this guy,” Campbell recalled. “The stories he told, the music – he had it all. And on the way out, I talked to Plunky, and I was like, ‘We have to do a documentary. Can I help you ?’ He said, ‘Sure, let’s talk about it.’

It was not a well-covered topic in music history. Primarily a jazz label, Black Fire was a small, niche operation with sales mostly concentrated in the DC area. Outside of the Beltway, most of his artists and recordings had cult hits at best.

On the other hand, its founding in 1975 coincided with the beginning of DC’s inner regime (to which the “HR” of Campbell’s operation refers), itself a microcosm of the growing political, social and economic consciousness of the African-Americans of the time. And it had significance beyond symbolism: Black Fire’s roster slowly expanded beyond jazz to include soul, funk and the early recordings of genre group Experience Unlimited – later known as from EU, one of the main artists in the DC go-go music scene. (A decade after his Black Fire debut, EU would perform “Da Butt” in Spike Lee’s “School Daze,” bringing perhaps his brightest international spotlight.)

It was a legacy worth commemorating.

Armed with a grant from HumanitiesDC and a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, Campbell assembled a team to produce “The Black Fire Documentary,” a 28-minute film that chronicles the label through archival footage and about two dozens of interviews (including, full disclosure, this writer).

But that wasn’t enough, Campbell decided. “Black Fire” needed a real splash.

The Home Rule Foundation was already sponsoring a series of concerts and movies at the Parks, an outdoor community space on the former Walter Reed campus. “The light bulb went on,” Campbell said. “Why don’t we get Plunky, try to get EU and [other representative artists]and spend a day of music, then end the day with the screening of the documentary? »

Branch quickly agreed. Jimmy Gray’s son, Jamal, a DC-based musician and curator, has also signed on to help the Home Rule Foundation organize the festival, scheduled for June 11 at the parks. Although EU has already been booked for a gig in Virginia, lead singer Gregory “Sugar Bear” Elliott has signed on for another date to lead a workshop on go-go music and culture.

Added to the procedure are artists who did not record for Black Fire but who represented the same era, the same philosophy and the same aesthetic. If the EU can’t make it happen, TCB – another beloved and long-running go-go band – can. Doug Carn, a witty jazz pianist (and a frequent presence at DC’s Bohemian Caverns in the 2000s and 2010s), recorded in the 1970s for the Black Jazz label of Oakland, California. He agreed to perform and lead a meditation workshop. CapitalBop, DC’s loyal jazz advocacy organization, features an octet led by saxophonist David Murray, arguably the most iconic avant-garde jazz artist of the 1970s and 1980s.

Add DJs to open the proceedings, on-site concessions by Denizens Brewing and Anxo restaurant and cider house, and even a special one-edition Home Rule magazine (in homage to Gray’s old Black Fire magazine), and a day of music and film becomes a full-fledged Home Rule festival.

Branch and Oneness of Juju close out the musical program, with the saxophonist next performing in the climactic documentary.

There’s a certain eerie irony in celebrating Black Fire — emblematic as it is of DC’s largely bygone ‘Chocolate City’ design — in Walter Reed’s parks, whose mixed-use redevelopment is a symbol of contemporary gentrification in the capital.

Yet there is also a note of victory. Amid new condominiums, a charter school and a Whole Foods, old DC is once again leaving an indelible mark.

“I think we’re hitting all the key components and under the guise of trying to follow the spirit of Black Fire and Jimmy, if we can,” Campbell says. “It’s tough on these tracks, but we’re doing our best. And we’re really excited about it.

Parks at Walter Reed, 1010 Butternut St. NW. homerulemusicfestival.com.

Date: June 11 from 3 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (the rainy date is June 12.)

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Sovereignty

Kerala launches tourism project by engaging in local self-government institutions

In an initiative to identify at least one tourist destination within each local self-government institution in the state, the Kerala Tourism Department on Wednesday launched the “Destination Challenge” project in collaboration with the Local Self-Government Department ( LSGD).

Local Government Minister, MV Govindan, presented the project, at a ceremony presided over by Tourism Minister, PA Mohamed Riyas, here today.

The project aims to develop tourism by ensuring the participation of local self-government institutions (LSGI) right from the village panchayats. The state government has given the administrative penalty for Rs 50 crore for the implementation of the project. Govindan, who has activated the “Destination Challenge” web portal, said the initiative will help LSGIs find financial resources, in addition to exploring many unexplored destinations to bring them onto the tourism map.

“In addition to providing civic services, LSGIs must reach new levels to become self-sufficient. We must plan projects that allow for overall growth. Tourism is an ideal sector for panchayats, municipalities and businesses to become job providers and also achieve financial stability,” he added.

Noting that the “Destination Challenge” is a new step forward for Kerala Tourism, Riyas said that through the project, the government plans to develop at least 500 tourist destinations in four years. Riyas said the project is part of the Ministry of Tourism’s efforts to develop a new tourism culture in the state and bring about significant change in four years. Marketing campaigns would also be intensified under the initiative.

“During the first phase of 2022, the state recorded a surge in the arrival of domestic tourists, touching around 38 lakh. ‘Destination Challenge’ will help develop tourist circuits in LSGIs and thus attract more domestic tourists,” he added.

The Mayor of Thiruvananthapuram Corporation, Arya Rajendran was the chief guest at the ceremony.

The Ministry of Tourism would bear 60% (maximum Rs 50 lakh) of the total cost of the project. LSGIs can get the rest of the amount either from their own fund or through sponsorship.

In addition to identifying at least one destination under each LSGI, the initiative envisions linking tourism activities to various LSGI projects, thus giving a boost to domestic tourism, which has grown in popularity after the pandemic.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Home rule

Matteson asks voters for home rule as Tinley Park District 140 seeks new school

Matteson officials promise lower taxes and fees if voters approve a June 28 referendum giving the village self-governing authority.

Such a decision “provides a greater level of self-determination” and gives the village greater financial flexibility, according to the village.

This is the second time Matteson has tried to win self-government status, as the referendum was rejected by voters in 2014.

Also on the primary ballot, a referendum in Kirby Elementary District 140 in Tinley Park seeks approval to build a new school, paid for with available cash reserves.

The self-governing authority gives a community options to impose new taxes, such as a sales tax or transfer tax, on property sales. Matteson officials passed a resolution stating that they had no plans to implement a transfer tax if voters approved of self-government.

The village council also recently put a cap on the village tax levy, with no increase for five years, even if the bylaws are approved.

Matteson officials said plans include using self-government status to “diversify revenue streams” to become less dependent on property taxes as a source of revenue.

The village would eliminate, with the exception of commercial vehicles, vehicle vignette fees and also remove a 1% tax on food and beverages purchased from restaurants and other venues that have catering facilities.

Illinois communities with a population of at least 25,000 automatically receive self-governing authority, and some that are under that population have gone to voters to win self-governing powers.

Matteson’s population is 19,374, according to the 2020 census, up from just under 18,300 in 2010.

Along with a transfer tax, self-governing communities can enact a sales tax, and Matteson is considering such a tax to pay for infrastructure work, such as improving village streets.

According to the village, the self-governing authority would also allow it to use the tax revenue generated from its hotel/motel tax for general fund purposes.

Officials said a separate domestic tax could also be applied to goods shipped from an Amazon fulfillment center, which opened last fall.

At a town hall meeting on Thursday, where much of the discussion centered on the benefits of embracing self-reliance, Mayor Sheila Chalmers-Currin said voter approval “would take Matteson to the next level. “.

Financially and in terms of economic development, Matteson is succeeding, said village administrator Anthony Burton, but would benefit more from self-governing approval.

“We’re doing well and we can do better,” Burton said.

The home rule would also allow Matteson to enact tougher crime-free housing rules aimed at rental units, Police Chief Michael Jones said at the meeting.

“It gives us a bit more bite and responsibility,” he said.

Separately, Kirby District 140 is seeking voter approval to tap into cash reserves to build a new Fernway Park School just west of the existing school at 16600 88th Ave., Orland Park.

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The district said there would be no property tax impact on residents of the district, but voter approval is needed to tap the reserves for the project, which would see an 83,000 square foot school built. at an estimated cost of $34 million.

The district had last summer considered three options that included building from scratch or adding to the existing school and renovating the 42,000 square foot space.

Remodeling the existing building and adding 42,000 square feet cost $25.5 million, while the 25,000 square foot remodel and adding 65,000 square feet was estimated at $31 million, according to Superintendent Michael Byrne. Both of these options were deemed too disruptive to the functioning of the school.

With the new building, the district will consolidate early childhood programs at Fernway, centralizing services for preschoolers and freeing up classrooms at other elementary schools in the district, according to District 140.

If voters approve the plan, the district plans to start next year and have the new school ready for the 2024-25 school year.

The existing building will continue to be used during construction, but will eventually be demolished to make way for parking, a playground and green space, according to the district.

[email protected]

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Home rule

City Council embraces idea of ​​’bylaws’ that could change Clarksville government

CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) — New legislation before City Council could trigger a referendum to reorganize the city of Clarksville under a “self-government” charter, and council members have questions. Questions such as, what is a self-governance charter?

The ordinance sponsored by council member Trisha Butler would add a referendum to the November ballot asking citizens if they would like Clarksville to have a self-government charter, something she has often expressed interest in.

“It shouldn’t come as a surprise because I’ve been shouting this from my seat for the last year,” Butler said during Thursday’s meeting.

What are “house rules”?

In Tennessee, home rule allows a city to change its own charter — essentially the city’s constitution — by referendum. If Butler’s amendment is successful, home rule would be added to the November ballot.

Basically, under the Home Rule, citizens vote directly on charter amendments every two years. A common model involves the formation of a committee to draft amendments, which are then added to the ballot.

Clarksville currently has a “private deed” charter, which requires approval from the state legislature to change. A home rule charter would remove state government from the equation, returning the affairs of the city to the citizens.

“Essentially, we can change our charter at the city level after allowing Clarksville residents to vote on amendments to our charter,” Butler said at the meeting. “It basically says we can make the best decisions for Clarksville rather than the state legislature, specifically that people should get more of a voice in what we do here.

Local self-government also allows citizens to add amendments via a petition.

According to Butler, 17 cities in Tennessee have self-government charters, including Knoxville, Chattanooga and Memphis.

“Too Big to Be Wrong”

Several council members have expressed concerns about a referendum on the domestic regime.

Brian Zacharias told fellow council members he fears a self-governance charter could lead to politicizing the city charter by subjecting it to the campaign process, which is often dictated by the party that spends more that the other.

Furthermore, he suggested that the domestic regime is a complicated issue and voters may not have enough time to make an informed decision by November.

“I think the simplicity of the question, ‘Should Clarksville adopt home rule?’ belies the seriousness of the consequences of this decision. How many voters understand what this question really asks? How many people in this room understand what this question really asks?

“Before we put this on the ballot, I think the city owes some information to its residents,” Zacharias said. “It’s too big to be wrong. We need the highest turnout possible, and we need those voters to fully understand what they’re being asked to consider.

Councilwoman Stacey Streetman voiced her opposition to a Home Rule referendum, suggesting that the city’s current structure is working and doesn’t need fixing.

“Our government has worked efficiently and effectively since our incorporation. We’ve been a private deed charter for a long time,” Streetman said.

Vondell Richmond, Wanda Smith, Karen Reynolds and Joe Shakeenab expressed similar concerns, citing the need for more information.

“A lot of things are catastrophic”

Butler responded by suggesting that these concerns underestimate the average voter, and that while three months is enough time to decide which candidate to vote for, that’s enough time to learn more about autonomy.

“I’m really disappointed with the amount of mistrust I’m hearing for the voter, for the citizen. … The fact that things are getting politicized should not overwhelm the voice of the people,” Butler said.

Butler called some concerns “catastrophic,” but said she could see the benefit of postponing a referendum until the next presidential election, which still sees the highest turnout in Montgomery County, and that would be in November 2024.

Wallace Redd and Ambar Marquis joined Butler in expressing support for a self-government referendum.

City Council will vote at its meeting Thursday at 6 p.m. If passed, the measure will require a second vote at the next meeting currently scheduled for July 7.

Correction: A previous version of this article should have stated that the ordinance sponsored by council member Trisha Butler would add a referendum to the November ballot.

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Home rule

Upper Darby Council May Have Violated Home Rule Charter, Lawyer Says – Delco Times

UPPER DARBY — The latest round of legal wrangling over the appropriation of American Rescue Plan Act money has created new questions about the Upper Darby Township Council’s finance committee’s efforts to allocate a portion ARPA funds and violation of township self-government charter rules, according to the law offices of Sean Kilkenny, who serves as the township’s attorney.

Upper Darby chief administrative officer Vincent Rongione issued the press release on Tuesday stating that council chairman Brian Burke and vice-chairman Laura Wentz are in violation of the Home Rule Charter, as interpreted by Kilkenny.

The review was requested by Mayor Barbarann ​​Keffer who said in the press release that some council members had been violating the council’s charter ban on interference for months and that it was harmful to the community.

According to the lawyer, the Autonomy Charter contains an express separation of powers, similar to the federal government, between the administration, which consists of the mayor and the chief executive, and the legislative branch, which is the township council.

The Home Rule Charter confers legislative powers only on the council.

Counsel therefore concluded that no member of council has the power to interfere in labor negotiations or the day-to-day administration of the township, or through the solicitation of applications from non-profit organizations, to meddle budget management.

Violation of the Autonomy Charter could mean the loss of a position.

Kilkenny’s legal opinion follows the publication by Marcum LLP. Independent forensic investigation into ARPA processing, which found that there was no misuse of ARPA funds. The board is also investigating the status of the funds, but has not released any findings.

At the May 4 meeting, the Upper Darby Council discussed releasing some of the Federal American Pandemic Rescue Plan funds that they withheld after questions about the misplacement of some of the funds from the ARPA.

At that meeting, Vice Chair Laura Wentz, D-At-Large, said the finance and appropriations committee was looking to allocate a portion of the funds.

The committee was preparing an order to release ARPA funds in the form of bonuses for township employees who worked during the pandemic; however, as these were union contracts, they filed it until township labor board attorneys reviewed the details.

Wentz also said at that meeting that the finance committee was seeking information from nonprofit organizations in the township that would be interested in receiving ARPA funds.

“We ask that you email us [email protected],” Wentz said at that meeting.

According to Kilkenny’s interpretation, this does not fall within the role of the council.

“Some council members violated the council’s charter prohibition on interference for months, but it has now become so blatant, obvious and damaging to our community that I have sought formal legal advice from our attorney,” Keffer said in the press release. “Our community and our employees deserve better than this from these board members. It really is high time to put aside personal feelings and petty political ambitions and do what is best for the people who have elected us to serve them.

“It is truly a sad thing for the community when politicians allow their ego to not only cloud their judgment, but to have a truly negative impact on the lives of the people they are elected to serve,” he said. said Rongione. “Unfortunately, this is exactly where these certain council members have led Upper Darby. It really should be embarrassing to them personally, but sadly and more importantly, as one resident said at a recent town hall meeting, their conduct is embarrassing to the whole community.

The two board members, Burke and Wentz, said they were reviewing the press release and had no comment.

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Home rule

Campbell and Kennedy honored as Home Rule heroes

Nick Blank, [email protected]

CLAY COUNTY — Local municipalities and state lawmakers are challenging House Rules issues on many fronts, from gardening to vacation rentals to how taxes can be collected .

Two local officials — Orange Park City Manager Sarah Campbell and Green Cove Springs City Manager Steve Kennedy — are being honored as Home Rule Heroes by the Florida League of Cities. There were over 150 elected and unelected recipients statewide.

Campbell was hired as city clerk in 2009 before being elevated to deputy city manager in 2015. Two years later, she was named to the city’s top job. She said she was honored by the League designation. Regarding the independence of cities, Campbell said that historically governments had to protect their citizens with walls and defenses, and there are parallels with today.


“…I like to think we offer the same protections. Every community is different,” Campbell said. “We need flexibility to build a community that reflects the people who have chosen to live here.”

She said Home Rule should allow towns and cities to legislate without interference.

Home Rule is a difficult proposition, however, because some cities abuse their power and this forces the legislature to act.

“To me, Home Rule means Orange Park has wide latitude to create laws and policies for the benefit of our citizens, without interference from the state,” she said.

Campbell said city and town managers need to be apolitical, though they often have partnerships with their state counterparts.

“We are proud to have established excellent relationships with our legislators and their staff,” she added. “I feel comfortable contacting any legislator to communicate the council’s position on proposed legislation.”

Kennedy was nominated by Green Cove Springs council members in 2018 after a long administrative and city manager career based in Georgia.

Kennedy said the duties he was recognized for, such as being engaged with state and federal officials, were part of his regular job. He cautioned against “broad” governance, saying what works for one community may not work for another.

“If we don’t have the problems Miami is facing, why should the state get involved in a solution and implement it statewide? Leave Miami, through the Home Rule process , to legislate the remedy for the problems they face,” Kennedy remarked. “Broad legislation at the state level that impacts cities, towns, and counties is dangerous and could have financial consequences that have a negative impact on local governments.”


Local issues must be addressed locally through locally enforced legislation, Kennedy said. He said all government matters were inherently political.

It’s critical, Kennedy said, that municipalities establish their needs, observe state-level events, and advocate for those needs.

“While engaging in the legislative process and trying to influence the decisions of legislators, it is more important that we as a city identify our goals, priorities and direction for Green Cove Springs, and then we can all monitoring legislative activities to ensure that no legislation is approved that will impact our goals, priorities and direction,” he said.

The Florida League of Cities asked its members to reach out to the legislature and provide local perspectives on an issue. Casey Cook, the organisation’s director of legislative affairs, said the crop of winners this year was deserving.


“We had a record number of Home Rule Heroes this year, which shows the dedication and impact of local authorities on behalf of their residents and businesses in protecting local decision-making,” Cook said. “These local leaders have been consistently engaged and actively defended their communities throughout the 2022 legislative session. They are Home Rule heroes and we thank them for their efforts.

According to the Florida League of Cities, winners will receive their awards at a later date.

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Self government

Protocol undermines Northern Ireland’s right to self-government

Although there is some appreciation of the difficulties caused by the protocol which the EU has seen fit to impose on Northern Ireland in connection with Brexit, the scale of the difficulties has been, and continues to be , massively underestimated. A clear example of this trend is provided by the Protocol Sub-Committee of the Lords European Affairs Committee. While it is encouraging that the Committee has recognized that there is a democratic problem with the Protocol that merits consideration, the manner in which the Committee has characterized the difficulty as a “democratic deficit” is deeply problematic.

When talking about EU-related challenges, the term “democratic deficit” has a well-established meaning that refers to a difficulty of a completely different order than that which affects Northern Ireland as a result of the protocol. It concerns Member States and their electorates (and not jurisdictions like the UK, and in this case Northern Ireland, which are not part of the EU) and stems from the fact that a large number of decisions are taken at a supranational level for which it is difficult for national parliaments to ensure accountability and yet for which the powers of the European Parliament are either too weak or too inaccessible to voters who instinctively seek accountability on a more immediate national basis rather than a distant supranational one.

But above all, while the democratic deficit is frustrating, it in no way leaves the peoples of the EU without democratic rights. There is a European Parliament representing the citizens of the EU in and through which they can seek and do seek, to some extent, to hold European governance to account and citizens can, of course, seek to hold the EU to account through their national governments, which are fully represented in EU institutions.

By contrast, the nature and extent of the democratic problems resulting from the EU Protocol on Northern Ireland are of a different order altogether. Instead of presenting us with a challenge that weakens democratic accountability, creating a shortfall that must be filled, the Protocol completely removes representative democracy from Northern Ireland in respect of some 300 legislative areas. The two scenarios – democratic difficulties resulting from EU membership and democratic problems resulting from the NI Protocol – are therefore like chalk and cheese. The latter requires a completely different characterization…

Read the full story at: Politico.co.uk.

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Sovereignty

The First Nations of Quebec launch an initiative to prepare self-government measures

By Patrick Quinn

Journalist of the Local Journalism Initiative

The Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador is launching an Office of Self-Determination and Self-Government to share research, legislative materials and training to help First Nations implement their own laws. The office will conduct studies, gather expertise and develop a “media watch” on issues related to self-determination.

“It is also a demonstration that we will stand up to colonial governments who would prefer to see us remain quiet and silent,” said AFNQL Chief Ghislain Picard during the April 28 announcement. “On the whole issue of consultation, Quebec is failing miserably.

The initiative follows a two-day meeting of AFNQL Chiefs, who agreed that government consultations on a range of issues were inadequate. Although Quebec unanimously adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2019, Picard believes that Premier François Legault is not living up to this commitment.

“On the one hand, they say they support this notion of a nation-to-nation relationship, and on the other hand, they act completely opposite to that very notion,” Picard asserted. “I would even go so far as to say that they perhaps understand too well what this entails and that is why we see so much of a dropout from them.

Relations between Quebec and the AFNQL deteriorated after the Great Economic Circle of Indigenous Peoples and Quebec in November, during which Legault made a brief appearance but did not interact with the chiefs.

The AFNQL chiefs then sent a letter to Legault insisting that projects impacting their territories could only proceed with the consent of the community. The Prime Minister did not respond.

“Exercising this right to self-determination is not an action against Quebecers and Canadians,” explained Picard. “This is a legitimate assumption of our responsibilities. The assertion of our rights will be a powerful lever to ensure respect for our principles and rights to the territory, but also for the preservation of our languages, our cultures and the improvement of our socio-economic conditions.

Kahnawake Chief Kahsennenhawe Sky-Deer called the establishment of the office a “very timely and empowering” example of the “Indigenous resurgence” that is developing across Canada. She pointed out that when people cross traditional Indigenous territories, they need to understand that there are particular laws that must be followed.

“Historically, we’ve been legislated, considered subordinate or not equal and that era is coming to an end,” Sky-Deer said. “We need to get past structures like the Indian Act and other colonial laws that affect our people.

The Indian Act delegated extensive powers to provincial governments, which exercised them unevenly. Changes to the law removed some discriminatory aspects and granted greater autonomy to Aboriginal people. But governance structures can vary considerably even within a province.

In 1984, the Cree-Naskapi Act became the first Aboriginal self-government legislation in Canada. It replaced the Indian Act and established these Indigenous communities as corporate entities. This law transferred to the Cree Nation Governance Agreement in 2017, creating the Cree Constitution and completely removing federal oversight over Category 1A lands.

Former Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come believed this agreement stayed true to the Cree vision of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, with the treaty signifying emancipation from the Indian Act and the means to self-government. . This led to the first Cree law, the Cree Language Act, and other steps towards self-determination.

The Mistissini governance project will create five laws intended to revitalize Cree legal principles and traditions. Consultations with community members will inform laws related to governance, hunting, development, Lake Mistissini and community constitution.

“The Cree Nation of Mistissini is working to craft fundamental laws that will capture in writing the heart of our Cree worldview _ our relationships with each other, with our lands and our waters,” said Chief Thomas Neeposh. “These laws will establish Cree traditional knowledge and authority in the form of legislation clearly describing how our Iinou Iidouwun, our laws and legal systems, values, principles and practices apply today.

The Cree Nation is developing ways to advance self-determination, most recently the Cree-Naskapi-Inuit Permanent Forum, a model for other First Nations. In its opposition to Bill 96, the Legault government’s controversial extension of French-language legislation, the AFNQL proposed, among other measures, to implement the same language of instruction principles applied to Cree and Inuit students.

On May 10, the AFNQL demanded nothing less than a total and resolute exemption from Bill 96 for First Nations members. This happened after repeated attempts to offer accommodations to make the law more reconcilable with inherent and constitutionally protected Indigenous rights were ignored or outright rejected.

“Even when we play by their rules, we become the victims because none of that is acknowledged,” Picard said. “We are no longer at the time of negotiations and settlements. We affirm clearly and with one voice today our absolute refusal to submit to Law 96 and to all other laws infringing on our rights.

patrick quinn is a Local Journalism Initiative reporter who works for THE NATION. The Local Journalism Initiative is funded by the Government of Canada. Turtle Island News does not receive funding from the LJI government.

Add your voice

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Home rule

Norton Steels for Fighting Greene, GOP Over DC Home Rule

DC Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton has warned Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a far-right Republican from Georgia, that if she works with her party members to repeal the District of Columbia’s Home Rule Act in the next Congress, she will fight. against her hands.

The Home Rule Act allows the city to elect a mayor to run its executive branch and a city council for its legislative branch. The legislation was signed into law in 1973 by President Richard M. Nixon, a Republican, who said it would give DC residents “the right to elect their own municipal officials and to govern themselves in local affairs. “.

In February, Greene’s Georgia Republican Representative Andrew Clyde suggested the repeal of Home Rule and said he was working on legislation to do so.

Additionally, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Rep. James Comer (R-Ky.), the ranking Republican on the Oversight and Reform Committee, said earlier this year that if the GOP is the majority party in the next Congress, they will limit the District’s ability to govern itself.

Currently, Norton is the second Democrat on the committee.

“The last time we heard of such threats to DC self-government from Republicans was in the early to mid-1990s,” the delegate said. “Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene and Andrew Clyde literally want the feds to take over running DC as a colony. Republicans fear that DC is getting closer to statehood than ever before, and their response, unsurprisingly, is to try to suppress the democracy that DC’s estimated 700,000 residents enjoy, including a plurality of African Americans. I will defeat their efforts, and their efforts will only strengthen our case for statehood.

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Home rule

Reading board member says bylaw charter and mayor’s authority are holding back city growth | Berks Regional News

READING, Pa. — Is Reading’s form of city government still working?

In its Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday, City Council reconsidered a proposal originally put forward in March to consider forming a commission to consider whether the Home Rule Charter form of government is still appropriate or whether another type of government should replace him.

Councilman Donna Reed took the lead in the discussion, saying the home rule charter style of government is responsible for the lack of progress with the city.

“I think it takes time for those of us who have been sitting here for a while,” Reed said. “What we have seen clearly since 1996 is the opposite of what it was supposed to do, mainly in terms of continuity in administrative positions.”

Under the “home rule” form of government, municipal affairs are governed by a local charter, rather than state laws, and the municipal government has more power to make decisions on its own. This type of government was established in the city in 1996 after being approved by the voters.

According to the City of Reading website, Home Rule Charter Government provides that “all powers not specifically granted to others by the Home Rule Charter shall be exercised by the City Council. city ​​council acts as the legislative branch of city government”.

“It’s been impractical because we’re looking at the progress that our city hasn’t made, compared to our neighboring cities,” Reed continued. “The constant changes in administrative positions have taken their toll with progress in this city, and we can all cite examples.”

Reed said she was particularly concerned that a mayor had the right to fire anyone at will without council consent.

Other members of the council, however, feared allowing a commission to propose a different form of government.

If the council agreed to go ahead with such a commission, it would have to pass an ordinance to form a government study commission, which would then have to gain voter approval in a general election.

The commission would then study the matter for 18 months and make a recommendation, which would again go to voters.

The Council would have no influence on the matter, which troubled some members.

“As far as I understand the purpose, I just want to warn you that this will not guarantee to fix what you would like to see happen,” Councilwoman Marcia Goodman-Hinnershitz said. “I think there are other ways to go. I want to be more proactive.”

Only Councilman Wesley Butler said he would support Reed’s proposal, saying full-time council members could prove beneficial to the city.

Gombar said council can make changes to the existing charter, including limiting the mayor’s power to fire employees without council consent.

Council members said they would be willing to have that discussion, and Reed agreed that it might be a good compromise.

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Home rule

Supreme Court Finds Lee’s School Voucher Program Doesn’t Violate House Rules Protections

Governor Bill Lee speaks in the Old Supreme Court Chamber of the State Capitol in Nashville on March 22, 2021. (Erik Schelzig, Tennessee Journal)

Three years after lawmakers narrowly passed Governor Bill Lee’s school voucher program, the state Supreme Court overturned lower court findings that it violated Bylaw protections against county laws individual by applying only to Nashville and Shelby County.

The 3-2 decision published on Thursday came after the High Court decided to rehear arguments following the death last year of Judge Connie Clark. Court of Appeals Judge Skip Frierson sat on the case and sided with Chief Justice Roger Page and Judge Jeff Bivins. Justices Sharon Lee and Holly Kirby dissented.

UPDATE: When the voucher bill was passed, it was tied to the transfer of calculated dollars through the basic education program to cover private school tuition. Lawmakers this year approved an overhaul of the school funding formula called Tennessee Investment in Student Achievement, which funds individual students rather than districts as a whole. The Lee administration included a provision in the law to change the mechanism for funding the voucher program from the old formula to the new:

SECTION 53. Tennessee Code Annotated Section 49-6-2603 is amended by deleting the term “Basic Education Program” wherever it appears and replacing it with “Tennessee’s Investment in the Success Formula.” students (TISA)”.

Here is the press release from the Administrative Office of the Courts:

In an opinion released today, the Tennessee Supreme Court determined that, although two county governments in Tennessee have standing to challenge the Education Savings Account Pilot Program (the “ESA Law”), Law No. is not rendered unconstitutional by the Home Rule Amendment, Section XI, Section 9, of the Tennessee Constitution.

In 2019, the Tennessee General Assembly signed into law the ESA Act. The law establishes a program whereby a limited number of eligible students directly receive their share of state and local education funds, which would normally be provided to the public school system they attend, to pay for an education in a private school. and associated expenses.

The Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, the Shelby County Government, and the Metropolitan Nashville Board of Public Education filed a lawsuit for declaratory judgment which named as defendants Governor Bill Lee, Commissioner of the Department of Education of Tennessee and the Tennessee Department of Education. The trial court also allowed other parties to intervene and participate as defendants. The complaint alleged that the ESA Act violated several provisions of the Tennessee Constitution, including the Home Rule Amendment, the Equal Protection Clauses, and the Education Clause.

The defendants filed separate motions challenging the plaintiffs’ ability to pursue the asserted claims and the legal sufficiency of those claims. The plaintiffs, in turn, filed a motion for summary judgment regarding their claim to change the Home Rule. The trial court determined that the two county plaintiffs had standing to pursue the claims, but dismissed the Metro School Board as a plaintiff for lack of standing. The trial court also granted the motion for summary judgment finding that the ESA Act violates the Home Rule Amendment and barred the state from implementing the law. The trial court reserved its decision on the defendants’ challenges to the claims of the equal protection and education clause.

The trial court granted the defendants an interlocutory appeal and the Court of Appeal granted the defendants’ appeals. The intermediate appeals court upheld the trial court, finding that Metro and Shelby County had standing to challenge the ESA Act under the Home Rule Amendment and that the law was unconstitutional under the autonomy amendment.

The Tennessee Supreme Court granted the defendants the leave to appeal applications. Since this is an interlocutory appeal, the issues before the Court were limited to the constitutionality of the ESA Act under the Home Rule Amendment and the ability of the plaintiffs to bring this challenge. The Supreme Court agreed with the trial court and the Court of Appeals that plaintiffs Metro and Shelby County had standing to file their Home Rule amendment petition. However, the Supreme Court, after reviewing the applicable constitutional language, held that the ESA Act was not rendered unconstitutional by the Home Rule Amendment because the Act is not “applicable” to the plaintiff’s counties for the purposes of the amendment. The majority concluded that the ESA Act is not applicable to the plaintiff’s counties because the statute regulates or governs the conduct of local education agencies and not the counties. Thus, the law does not violate the Home Rule Amendment. The Supreme Court therefore affirmed, in part, and reversed, in part, the judgment of the Court of Appeal and sent the case back to the trial court for the dismissal of the Home Rule amendment application and for consideration of the applicants’ remaining applications.

Judge Sharon G. Lee and Judge Holly Kirby joined in a separate, partly concurring and partly dissenting opinion. They agreed with the Court that Metro and Shelby County had standing to challenge the ESA Act, but found the law violated the Home Rule Amendment. In their view, the ESA Act significantly affects the ability of Metro and Shelby County to self-govern and decide on school funding issues. Under ESA law, only Metro and Shelby counties and no other counties in the state have to pay for students who drop out of public schools and use their private school tuition vouchers. Because the ESA Act has local effect and application, and because the law gives Metro and Shelby County no choice in the matter, it violates the Home Rule Amendment.

To read the majority opinion in Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, et al. v. Tennessee Department of Education, et al.written by Chief Justice Roger A. Page, and the separate opinion written by Judge Sharon G. Lee, visit the Opinions section of TNCourts.gov.

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Home rule

Home Rule Week Edition – Streetsblog New York City

The big news this week will be Mayor Adams’ trip to Albany on Tuesday to push for state lawmakers to reauthorize or expand the city’s control over public schools, the Affordable Housing Grant (aka 421-a) and , as we like to say, most important, speed control cameras.

Gothamist had a good primer on the issue of “home rule,” which is the language of the state constitution to let the city run the things that only cities really care about: local schools, local development, and local roads. The Home Rule is pretty much dead on radar (as we first reported last week), so Adams will push lawmakers to pass a bill from Sen. Andrew Gounardes to at least reauthorize them for three years. (The bill includes other provisions that probably won’t make it into the final bill, judging by our conversations last week with Assembly members and senators, but still).

In other news:

  • Ladies and gentlemen, the GOAT on a bike (uh, but why does Tom Brady need a electric Citi bike? Stars – they are not like us):
  • Meanwhile, while Tom Brady was enjoying a ride on an e-bike, his naughty cousin Steve Cuozzo, released the ‘angry man screams cloud’ track for another NY Post rampage against bikes, in this case, e-bikes, which Cuozzo says should be banned altogether. A man is entitled to his opinion, but there are numerous factual errors in the article, as well as errors of omission, including the failure to provide this video to show the corresponding destructive power of an electric car :
  • The Daily News also covered the murder of a Bronx pedestrian by a reckless van driver on Saturday, although all day our old editor tried to impress on someone at the paper how terrible their website is. :
  • Assembly candidate Tony Simone is the latest Hells Kitchen resident to complain that the governor’s plan for Penn Station redevelopment is flawed. (Gotham Gazette)
  • The Regional Plan Association conducted another survey of New Yorkers in the metropolitan area and found that crime and the cost of living were the top concerns (although it is unclear how these concerns were distributed among city ​​residents and out-of-town residents). But one thing still really caught our attention: residents remain concerned about climate change. “More than three out of four [area] residents (76%) agree that buildings need to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, including 79% of New York residents,” the poll said. Seems like that’s a pretty strong mandate for car reduction strategies as well.
  • Let’s bet that these new electric road sweepers from the sanitation service are silent:
  • Federal officials are finally talking about the one thing that will stop the chop: Federal legislation to prevent helicopters from disturbing the peace. (amNY)
  • Mayor Adams says the Brooklyn-Queens Freeway will be fine, which is why he’s diverted money from its upkeep for the time being. (amNY)
  • Another reason to ditch the car? Auto theft is on the rise. (New York Post)
  • The Post has a bit more about the man who was run over and killed by an MTA bus driver in Staten Island.
  • And, finally, Riders Alliance spokesman Danny Pearlstein spotted one of the new DOT “drive safe” ads the other day on a bus shelter and noted that the ad was pointed in a way that it wouldn’t be seen by drivers. Doug Gordon provided the hunter:

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Independence activist

Cyril Corcoran: Scottish independence activist for 70 years supporting Yes

CYRIL Corcoran was a supporter of independence long before it was a mainstream view. Since the 1950s he has wanted home rule for Scotland and that indy fire has been burning bright ever since.

Now 81, The National caught up with the Yes campaigner to find out why his conviction has never wavered.

“I started 70 years ago,” he says over the phone, fresh from a hospital appointment. “I must have been maybe 15 years old. It was home rule then and I always wanted it.

“I have always wanted freedom for our country. I joined the SNP later in the late 50s or 60s.”

Although he joined the Scottish National Party around 70 years ago, Corcoran is a fairly new but nonetheless well-loved activist in the party.

READ MORE: Comedian Nish Kumar on independence, the BBC, Nadine Dorries and performing in Scotland

Despite being in his 80s, the Borders veteran got involved in activism for the reason thousands of young people across Scotland did it – 2014.

“I have always voted for the SNP and when the referendum came around, I decided to get involved,” he explains. “I was mostly active in the background until, you could say, I sort of sprouted when it came to the independence referendum.”

What he learned through his activism was much more than politics. Friendship, Corcoran says, stood out from his campaign. While traveling across the country, meeting friendly faces along the way, Corcoran said he felt accepted by the movement he had been a part of since before most of his peers were even born.

Corcoran has long believed in independence, at a time when it was seen as just a fringe idea. It’s stuck with him all this time, and it’s only gotten stronger too, just as independence has moved from the periphery of Scottish politics to its boundary line.

“I think more and more people are starting to realize what Westminster is doing,” Corcoran said. “Young people today are starting to think ‘what’s going on?’ There are so many things in this country that we have. We deserve to be an independent country.

Corcoran is happy to see how things have changed with young Scots overwhelmingly supporting Yes.

But it wasn’t always like that, as he pointed out. “It was a funny thing. Most people kept it to themselves. If you said you were SNP, you would be ridiculed and everything.

During his time as an independent activist, the frontier met countless activists like himself, as well as high-profile politicians, including Nicola Sturgeon. He says he remembers the day he met the SNP leader: “I think the first time was quite funny. I was at the conference in Glasgow. I came down for breakfast and she was sitting there. I said ‘good morning, Prime Minister’ and then I had my breakfast. And then I was at a lunchtime event and the doors at the top of the stairs opened and it was Nicola, and she said ‘again?’

“Later that night I was walking into the dining room and she was there again. She laughed and said ‘are you stalking me?’

Corcoran would meet Sturgeon again shortly after the event, when the pair were pictured sitting next to each other for a Cycling Without Age charity event, both seen laughing.

Having lived through various periods of division and turmoil within the SNP, Corcoran said he hoped the whole Yes movement would be more united.

“I wish everyone was more or less united. I keep thinking about all that divisive and falling stuff.

CORCORAN says he is 95% sure Scotland will eventually gain independence, but does not know when that will happen.

He believes Boris Johnson being the prime minister and scandals such as partygate will convince many no voters to switch sides. “More and more people are starting to see it through,” he said, adding that it’s the older generation who aren’t convinced yet.

The 81-year-old started out as a grocer, working in mills, hotels, construction sites and traveling with the circus before finally landing in his own taxi.

He also spent just under two years in the army, being sent to Libya. A little warmer than Galashiels, he remarks.

He married his wife Ray in 1966. “It was a bad year for me,” he jokes, “because I got married and England won the World Cup.”

Reflecting on his support for Indy, Corcoran said what he wants to see most is a better life for the next generation.

He says, “The reason I’m doing it now is so that the children have a better life than ours. In the 50s and 60s we were promised a better life, but now it is deteriorating. I want a better life for young people growing up now, so they can be free and make their own decisions.

READ MORE: ‘The game is ready for Union,’ says Ian Blackford as he calls indyref2

Recently, Corcoran was diagnosed with lung cancer, which has spread throughout his body. He was receiving chemotherapy, but after the interview informed The National he had been removed, with the NHS believing it would do more harm than good.

He has previously struggled with health issues, battling alcoholism, depression and anxiety. But was happy to report that at the end of the month he will be 30 years sober.

But his campaign continues undeterred, and wherever there is an independent street stand, he says he will be there.

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Self government

The Governor General uses her trip to Nunavik to highlight the importance of self-government

Governor General Mary Simon says she wants to see Indigenous communities take back the power they held before colonization

Governor General Mary Simon wasted no time this week on her first trip to Nunavik in three years, using the visit to encourage leaders to advance self-government negotiations.

Simon, originally from Kuujjuaq and former president of Makivik Corp., has her own experience as a lead negotiator in the Nunavik self-determination process.

On her first day in the area, she brought up the issue during a meeting with Makivik Corp. and other representatives of Inuit organizations from Nunavik, emphasizing the need to negotiate a new agreement with the Government of Quebec.

She also worked on the other side of the table, pushing Quebec Premier François Legault to appoint a negotiator. During briefings with Makivik executives on Monday, she assured that the work had paid off.

“[Legault] committed in the meeting with me to appoint a negotiator,” she said. “I asked him to say it twice, so he said it publicly.”

Simon sat down with Nunatsiaq News during her five-day tour of Nunavik this week, to discuss why the quest for self-government in Nunavik is so important to her.

“The goal of negotiating self-determination or self-government agreements in, I think, all parts of Canada, Indigenous communities, is to bring back the power that we had before colonization,” she said. .

Simon said one of his visions for Inuit self-determination is that infrastructure and social development in the Arctic should match some of the development that has happened in the rest of Canada.

However, she says, development in Nunavik must be led and controlled by the region’s Inuit.

“For Inuit, it’s important that there is a mesh of ways of looking at how infrastructure is developed, and that infrastructure supports different things like education, health, municipal services,” said she said.

“All of these different services that are in the communities are going to be encompassed by this self-government agreement, you have to watch how these things evolve as you negotiate self-government.”

There are areas where Nunavimmiut are leading the charge on social issues, through the Isuarsivik Regional Recovery Center in Kuujjuaq and the Unaaq Men’s Association in Inukjuak.

“I’m really happy to listen to the challenges that people face in their communities, I’m also really happy to listen to the success stories, so hopefully I can bring that to a wider audience in Canada,” said Simon, after meeting with representatives of these groups.

“Communities, on the one hand, have a lot of social problems, but on the other hand, they also thrive, they speak their language, they practice their culture, and in some of the schools that we have been, the people who work there speak to students in Inuktitut.

Simon’s Nunavik tour included stops in Kuujjuaq, Kangiqsualujjuaq and Inukjuak. A planned visit to Kangiqsujuaq was canceled on Wednesday due to poor flying conditions, with Simon calling on community representatives to apologize and promising to return in the future.

She described her visit to Nunavik as “comforting” and “gratifying”.

Governors general generally serve a five-year term. In the four years remaining in Simon’s term, she said she hopes to be able to visit all the communities in Nunavik and see as much of Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon as possible.

“I have a lot of traveling to do,” she said.

Each time Simon returns to Nunavik, she will be welcomed with open arms, said Mary Johannes, Mayor of Kuujjuaq and friend of Simon’s family.

“It was a special time for us, and for our community, our city, and to welcome him into our home,” Johannes said. “It’s a special week for us and we hope to see her again.”

Simon’s Nunavik tour ended on Friday.

Next, she will travel to Toronto for the Juno Awards, where she will present the Humanitarian Award to Inuk singer-songwriter Susan Aglukark.

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Self government

Lawsuit against DeSantis dismissed for revoking Disney’s self-government

The lawsuit filed last week by Florida taxpayers against GOP Governor Ron DeSantis’ decision to pass legislation revoking Disney’s private government was thrown out by a federal judge, WESH 2 News reported.

The lawsuit accused DeSantis and other state officials of violating taxpayers’ constitutional rights, as well as Disney’s First Amendment rights, by pushing through legislation designed solely to punish the company after its CEO opposed the state’s Parental Rights in Education Act which prohibits instruction. about sexual orientation and gender identity in kindergarten through third grade, which critics say marginalizes LGBTQ+ people.

U.S. District Court Judge Cecilia Altonaga wrote that the suit was dismissed because of the federal court’s lack of jurisdiction over state matters and because the law does not take effect until in July 2023, according to the Sentinel of the Florida Sun.

Litigants feared that because of the law, local taxpayers would now have to pay for a host of services, such as road maintenance and a fire department, that Disney has paid for for the past 55 years, Deadline reported.

But Altonaga, who was appointed by George W. Bush, pointed out that the plaintiffs based their claim to act on the assumption that eliminating the district “could result in financial harm to the plaintiffs because of increased tax which has not yet been promulgated”. indirect and highly speculative alleged harm cannot justify federal jurisdiction. … Again – it should be emphasized – the bill does not apply to plaintiffs at all,” Fox Business reported.

© 2022 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

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Home rule

Peter Hitchens says UK should have granted Home Rule to Ireland before 1914

Home Rule was a movement that campaigned for Irish autonomy within the United Kingdom

Peter Hitchens believes that the British government should have granted Home Rule to Ireland before 1914.

Home Rule was a movement that campaigned for Irish self-government within the United Kingdom.

A Home Rule Bill was introduced in the House of Commons three times, once in 1886, then again in 1893 and again in 1912.

It was finally passed by Parliament in 1914.

Peter Hitchens talks to Mark Steyn

Michelle O'Neill, Vice President of Sinn Fein

Michelle O’Neill, Vice President of Sinn Fein

But Mr Hitchens believes the British establishment has “long wanted to get rid of Northern Ireland”, adding that the Home Rule Bill should have been approved before 1914.

Speaking to Mark Steyn on GB News, Mr Hitchens said: ‘John Major had made it clear in his great, unselfish statement about remaining interests that people who call them loyalists in Northern Ireland increasingly find this country they want to be loyal to. I don’t want to have them.

“The British establishment has long wanted to get rid of Northern Ireland, it’s expensive, it’s complicated, it’s difficult.

“And they’re facing enormous pressure from outside, I imagine strongly from the European Union, I know for sure from the United States, to find a way to hand over the baton.”

Boris Johnson admits Northern Ireland protocol situation is now ‘very serious’

He continued: “What I find distressing about this is that if you talk about it with any frankness you immediately get into this horrible sectarian, one side of the other football, team stuff. United vs City football.

“Because you don’t like Sinn Fein, people think you’re part of the Orange Order.

“I actually think the British government should have granted Home Rule to Ireland before 1914.

“I think the mismanagement of that and the terrible mismanagement of the Easter Rising, the execution of leaders, disastrous policies.

“Northern Ireland’s neglect in the post-war period was also a great disgrace.

“But there have always been plenty of peaceful, law-abiding people in Northern Ireland who believe in Irish nationalism and have sought a peaceful path to some kind of sensible compromise.

“And what this deal did was it pushed them to one side.”

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Sovereignty

Minister of Local Government of Kerala, MV Govindan – The New Indian Express

By Express press service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Exceeding the target of creating 5,000 jobs through Kudumbashree’s various livelihood programs, the government claims to have created more than 10,000 jobs in the self-employment and daily wage sector through various Kudumbashree initiatives under of its ongoing 100-day program.

Local Government Minister MV Govindan said it was a great achievement that the government was able to exceed its target. Kudumbashree was able to create 592 jobs through the National Urban Livelihood Mission, 110 through the Startup Village Entrepreneurship Program, 5,622 through micro-enterprises, 592 through livestock programs, and 261 through value-added agricultural products.

Through the Pravasi Bhadratha project, interest-free loans were provided to create 2,824 jobs for NRKs who had returned to the state. Under this scheme, a maximum of Rs 2 lakh has been granted as a loan to each beneficiary. The program, aimed at generating 1,000 business ventures for NRK, was able to help 1,719 businesses.

Kudumbashree has also been able to equip 2,678 young people to gain daily wage employment by providing them with vocational training through the Yuva Keralam and Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana projects.

According to the minister, a 1 lakh entrepreneur identification project will also be launched soon in association with local bodies. Another project to provide jobs for 20 lakh people in association with K-DISC was also progressing at a rapid pace, the minister said.

Reiterating the government’s commitment to solving the unemployment problems plaguing the state, the minister distributed certificates and statuettes to people who got jobs through projects like Yuva Keralam and to those who started businesses businesses using loans from the Pravasi Bhadratha program.

Panchayat District Chairman Dr Suresh presided over the ceremony. Kudumbashree Executive Director Sreevidya PI, Kasaragod District Panchayat Chairman Baby Balakrishnan and Kudumbashree Chief Operating Officer Sreekanth AS were among those who spoke at the event.

Opportunities in Kudumbashree

  • 5,622 jobs via micro-enterprises

  • 2,824 through the Pravasi Bhadratha project

  • 2,678 through vocational training under the Yuva Keralam and Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana projects

  • 592 via the National Urban Livelihoods Mission

  • 592 via breeding programs

  • 261 through value-added agricultural products

  • 110 through the Startup Village entrepreneurship program

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Sovereignty

Dissolving theme park self-government won’t be so simple

In late April, a short special session of the Florida legislature voted to dissolve the Reedy Creek Improvement District, a previously little-known entity that functions as the private government of Disney Co. in central Florida.

For more than 50 years, the district has enabled Disney to oversee various services for 27,000 acres in central Florida that house the company’s theme parks.

The disbandment, widely understood to be part of a larger political row over the “Don’t Say Gay” law between Disney and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, leaves a series of unresolved issues in its wake, experts said. bisnow this week.

One uncertainty is the fate of more than hundreds of millions of bonds issued by the district. In addition, there is the potentially longer-term question of whether Orange and Osceola counties will be permanently responsible for providing the services currently provided by Reedy Creek.

“I’m not sure there has ever been a case where a special district was disbanded without a specific plan in place on how the debt and services provided by the district would be distributed among the local governments,” they said. said Shepard, Smith, Kohlmyer & Hand. partner Jacob Schumer, who is based in Orlando.

That kind of uncertainty is a recipe for legal challenges, he added, and at this stage of the game any number of legal challenges are possible. This is especially true if the Florida legislature does not reinstate the district or devise another solution that would satisfy everyone involved.

Given the stormy political circumstances that prompted the Florida legislature to shut down Reedy Creek, finding such a solution could be problematic.

“It was a way for Governor DeSantis to appeal to his conservative base and gain more national attention, to get his name recognized among Republican voters across the country,” Aubrey Jewett said. , an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Central Florida, specializing in Florida politics.

The governor’s office did not respond to questions from bisnow On the question.

“About an hour before the start of the special session, the governor announced that he was expanding the session to include the dissolution [of] Reedy Creek,” Jewett said. “So there was no warning, and a few days later, bing-bang-boom, it was done, with virtually no research into the financial implications for the government. or whatever.”

The governor’s office released a statement shortly after DeSantis signed the bill stating that “in the near future, we will be proposing additional legislation to authorize additional special districts in a manner that ensures transparency and rules fair gaming under the law”.

No details were offered.

Legal challenges to the dissolution could come from multiple quarters, Schumer said.

Assuming there are no changes to the disbandment plan, Disney could have a First Amendment retaliatory lawsuit claiming the state punished him for exercising his free speech rights, a he noted. In such a case, the state could argue that it was within its rights, as the original creator of the special district, to dissolve it.

While possible, a First Amendment lawsuit is less likely than a lawsuit by Reedy Creek bondholders to stop the dissolution law from going into effect, Schumer said, and it’s possible some taxpayers in the county are also suing.

“It’s hard to guess what the private actors will do, but since every bondholder theoretically has the ability to sue, I would expect at least some of them to want to litigate. the cause – stepping in to say, it’s not OK,” Schumer said. “As it stands, the district’s debt is going to be dumped on Orange and Oceola counties.”

Currently, Reedy Creek has about $79 million in utility revenue and refund obligations and $766 million in ad valorem tax obligations, according to Fitch, which recently said the bill poses “significant risk.” for the credit quality of these districts, including Reedy”. Creek Improvement District.”

Reedy Creek did not respond to a question from bisnowBut the district issued a statement shortly after the legislature moved to dissolve it, attempting to reassure bondholders that Florida law requires that even in cases like this, they will be paid.

“In light of the State of Florida’s commitment to the District’s bondholders, Reedy Creek plans to explore its options while continuing its current operations, including…debt service payments on its ad valorem tax obligations and its utility revenue obligations, pursuant to its debt covenants and the operation and maintenance of its properties,” the statement read.

Reserved area

Bisnow/Dees Stribling

The Old State Capitol in Tallahassee

Although Reedy Creek is unique in that it is controlled by a major entertainment conglomerate, many of the powers granted to the district are found in other special districts in Florida, according to Jewett.

“For example, we have many community development districts, which are formed to finance, build and maintain infrastructure for new developments, and, like Reedy Creek, can issue tax-exempt municipal bonds to raise funds,” said Jewett.

The district also has the power “to issue general obligation bonds, revenue bonds, assessment bonds, or any other bond”, according to the 1967 charter.

Under Florida law, there are also fire protection districts, utility districts (water, sewer, electrical), drainage districts, mosquito control districts, transportation districts for roads and bridges, sanitation districts for solid waste and environmental districts to protect the land.

Most other states also provide this type of special districts.

“Yet the combination of powers given to Reedy Creek is not found in any other special district in Florida, and there are also a few powers that you won’t find anywhere else,” Jewett said.

More prosaically, these exceptional powers include Reedy Creek’s ability to have its own building code and building inspections, but Reedy Creek also possesses at least one very unusual power, at least by 21st century standards: the ability to develop a nuclear power plant.

In the 1960s, part of Disney’s plans for Reedy Creek included residential development, and it was seen at the time as a forward-thinking option for local power generation.

The ability to sue could be delayed, however, given the long delay – more than a year – before Reedy Creek is actually scheduled for bed.

“The biggest legal hurdle in my mind is that the dissolution doesn’t happen until June 1, 2023,” said Lewis, Longman & Walker shareholder Chris Lyon, who is based in Tallahassee and has represented special districts in as a lawyer and lobbyist for almost 20 years. “I’m not sure a court case on the debt issue is ripe before then.”

As for the argument that a referendum is needed to dissolve the district, Lyon said he doesn’t think that holds water, because the legislator made a specific exception to this law, which he is entitled to. to do.

During debate on the bill, Rep. Randy Fine, a Republican, said it replaces a requirement in Florida law that specifies that voters in a special district must approve its dissolution.

To which state Rep. Dotie Joseph, a Democrat, responded, according to CNN: “I think to change the law that’s there, you’ll repeal it, not just put in another one that violates it, but what the I know? I’m just a lawyer.”

A stakeholder vote on dissolution might be off the table, but that doesn’t mean the interested parties — Disney and the state — won’t negotiate, even though Disney has so far remained mum on its plans.

“Pragmatically, I imagine Disney/Reedy Creek would like to end this dispute and work with the Governor and Legislature to reinstate the District concurrently with the Dissolution Date – which the law allows – rather than to continue the fight by going to court,” Lyon said.

“What’s most likely to happen is a renegotiation,” said Eleanor Wilking, an assistant professor at Cornell Law School who studies tax policy.

“There are strong incentives on both sides that they come to an agreement and have Reedy Creek, or something very similar, reinstated,” Wilking said. “The political pressure is going to come from voters and representatives in Central Florida who don’t [want] a sudden property tax hike, no matter how big.”

There have been bottom-of-the-envelope calculations about how much ending Reedy Creek could cost the two counties, but no hard numbers yet, Jewett said.

“I think the governor and the legislature now realize that this looks bad politically, so I expect some sort of action on the matter shortly,” Jewett said.

“Dissolving Rey Creek is going to affect taxpayers no matter how they choose to do it,” said Sen. Linda Stewart, a Democrat who represents part of Orange County. bisnow. “It’s unavoidable. It wasn’t broken to begin with, so we don’t know why the state is changing it, other than the difference of opinion on a social issue between Disney and the governor.”

Stewart said the final numbers haven’t been worked out yet, but she thinks at least $1 billion is a useful shorthand. The Orange and Osceola county ratepayers bill will be at least as much, if not more, if Reedy Creek were really to be dissolved, she said.

“The amount of a property tax increase is of course based on the value of your home or commercial property,” Stewart said. “So for an Orange County homeowner, it could cost between $1,200 and $2,200 more per year, every year. It would probably be more for commercial owners.”

According to other calculations, the increases for landowners are considerably less than this.

Disney makes annual payments to the Reedy Creek Improvement District of $105 million for operations and $58 million for bond debt, or $163 million a year that would be passed on to local taxpayers, according to news outlet WESH.

Using that figure, a median-priced home in Orange County would pay $156 to $208 a year more if Disney’s government was ultimately dismantled, WESH estimates.

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Self government

Disney in the dark about Florida’s decision to dissolve self-government

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — At Walt Disney World’s first private government meeting since Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a measure to disband it next year, officials said Wednesday they were still confused about the meaning of the new legislation, although some ripple effects were beginning to be felt.

The government administrator, called Reedy Creek Improvement District, said the expansion of a solar power project could be delayed due to funding issues related to legislation, and the district’s firefighters’ union has expressed concerns. concerns about what disbanding might mean for members. lifetime benefits.

After the meeting, Donald Greer, a member of Reedy Creek’s board of supervisors since 1975, said the board could not provide clear answers on these questions because “we don’t know where we are going.”

“The district may have an answer as soon as we know what that means, but I don’t know if anyone knows what that means. I don’t think anyone has deciphered it,” Greer said.

DeSantis signed the measure into law last week in a move that many saw as punishment for Disney’s opposition to yet another new law banning gender identity and the teaching of sexual orientation at the start of elementary school, which critics call “Don’t Say Gay”.

Last week, a day before DeSantis signed the bill, the Reedy Creek Improvement District sent a statement to investors saying it would continue financial operations as usual. The district wrote that its agreement with the state prohibits Florida from limiting or altering the district’s ability to collect taxes or meet its obligations.

Critics of the dissolution bill have warned that taxpayers in neighboring counties could end up shouldering around $1 billion in debt to the district. DeSantis dismissed those concerns and said additional legislation would be drafted to clarify the future of these special districts in the state.

At the Reedy Creek meeting on Wednesday, District Administrator John Classe said a developer had run into difficulty funding a planned expansion of a solar power program, meaning he could be delayed.

Jon Shirey, union chief of Reedy Creek firefighters, who make up about half of the 400 private government employees, asked supervisors to reassure his members that their jobs and benefits would be preserved.

“We were told to be quiet, not to talk to the media, not to deal with current events,” Shirey told supervisors. “We were told that the district leaders would tell the story. They will be the ones to get the message across. I ask you: ‘What is this message?’

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Sovereignty

Florida Legislature votes to strip Disney self-government in favor of DeSantis

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Governor Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the giant. Entertainment for opposing a measure that critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serves to further sour relations between the Republican-led government and a major political actor in the state.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against policies such as race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the most popular GOP politicians in the country. and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The dispute with Disney involves the company’s criticism of a new law banning teaching about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as teaching that is not “appropriate to age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to hold the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

The bill passed by the Legislature on Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure restores the districts, leaving an avenue to renegotiate its future. It is now moving to DeSantis’ office to be signed into law.

Democrats slammed the proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local property owners could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

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Home rule

Florida governor paraphrases bill stripping Disney of self-governing authority

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed a bill Friday that strips the Walt Disney Co of self-governing authority in its Orlando-area parks to counter resistance to a new bylaw that restricts teaching about LGBTQ issues. in schools. The Republican-controlled Legislature on Thursday approved the bill, which will remove special governmental jurisdiction that allows the organization to operate Walt Disney World Resort as its own town. Within the 25,000 acre territory, it serves four theme parks, two water parks and 175 miles of road.

Disney did not immediately comment on the signing of the bill.

Disney’s special status “was really an aberration,” DeSantis said at a press conference where he signed the bill. “No individual or business in Florida is treated this way.”

While the financial impact on the company and the state is uncertain, the change could alter the way Disney runs its sprawling Central Florida empire and strain the close relationship it has had with the state for more than a decade. 50 years.

DeSantis is a potential 2024 Republican presidential candidate who has courted conservative voters on issues including immigration, abortion and LGBTQ rights.

The governor said Friday that Disney would pay more taxes because of the law, but did not elaborate.

With his latest decision against Disney, DeSantis is trying to restore his conservative image by showing he’s ready to stand up to what he described as a “woke” California-based company that doesn’t share Florida values.

Disney initially did not publicly oppose LGBTQ legislation last month, drawing criticism from that community and some employees. The company later condemned the law and said it would suspend political donations in Florida pending a review.

The law, dubbed the “don’t say gay” bill by critics, prohibits classroom teaching about sexual orientation or gender identity for children in kindergarten through third grade. DeSantis supported the measure, saying it would give parents more control over their children’s education. Opponents call it a thinly veiled attempt to marginalize gay and transgender students, or children of gay parents.

At a fundraiser in Seattle on Thursday, President Joe Biden weighed in on the clash between Disney and Republicans in Florida. He said efforts to impose such constraints “have nothing to do with traditional conservative doctrine.” “I respect the Conservatives. There’s nothing conservative about deciding that you’re going to throw Disney out of its current posture because Mickey Mouse…shouldn’t…can’t say, you know, gay.

While the bill appears to be an attack on Disney and Orlando’s sprawling theme parks, experts say the financial impact of the legislation on the company and the state is unclear at this point. DeSantis rushed the bill through the statehouse, pushing it through within three days of a special session, but it won’t go into effect until June 2023, giving both sides time to adjust to the new reality.

The law dissolves the Reedy Creek Improvement District, which was created in the 1960s to attract Disney World to the state, after the much smaller Disneyland became a hit theme park in California. For more than half a century, the District has enabled Disney to operate as a county government, providing services such as firefighting, power, water and roads in Orange Counties and Osceola. In turn, Disney can issue bonds with tax advantages to pay for the improvements.

Disney is a major political contributor in the state. During the 2020 election cycle, the company donated a total of $4.8 million, including campaign funds, to more than 100 individual members of the Florida Legislative Assembly, some of whom sponsored the legislation of Thursday, according to state records. It’s unclear whether the state or the company will be harmed the most now that the bill has become law.

Summary of news:

  • Florida governor paraphrases bill stripping Disney of self-governing authority
  • Check out all the news and articles from the latest business news updates.
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Self government

Florida Governor DeSantis signs bill eliminating Disney self-government and certain other special districts

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Florida. –Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has signed a bill that eliminates special districts created before 1968, including Disney’s Reedy Creek Improvement District.

The governor signed several bills into law during a ceremony at a South Florida charter school on Friday afternoon, including the special districts bill introduced by Rep. Randy Fine. The Reedy Creek Improvement District – created by state legislators in 1967 – acts as Walt Disney World’s own government with two towns and lands in Orange and Osceola counties.

[TRENDING: WATCH: Mike Tyson caught on video punching man on flight to Florida | READ: Florida shares examples from rejected math textbooks | Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

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The initial conversation about repealing the Reedy Creek Improvement District began when Disney spoke out against signing the “Parental Rights in Education” bill, dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” bill. As the bill approached DeSantis’ desk earlier in March, multiple protests were held calling on Disney to do what it could to speak out against the legislation and halt its momentum in the Florida legislature.

DeSantis commented on Disney’s action at Friday’s press conference and said that while “none of this happened, it’s the right thing to do,” calling Disney’s government “unlike to everything we know in the state of Florida.”

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“No individual or business in Florida is treated this way, and it’s not fair to have this similar treatment. But you know, they had wielded a lot of power over the years. It was never something that was debated. In fact, I don’t even know if I even knew the name of it before it became something that was live for the past few months,” he said.

According to the wording of the bill, it will dissolve “any independent special district established by special statute prior to the date of ratification of the Constitution of Florida on November 5, 1968, and which has not been reinstated, re-ratified, or otherwise reconstituted by a special law or a general law subsequent to November 5, 1968.

Although the details are far from clear, the proposal could have huge tax implications for Disney. Democratic state lawmakers who oppose the bill have also warned that it could result in hefty tax bills for owners if they had to absorb the costs the company used to pay.

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Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings, whose county is partly home to Disney World, said it would be “catastrophic to our budget” if the county had to bear the cost of public safety at the theme park. Reedy Creek is currently reimbursing the Orange County Sheriff’s Office for public safety costs.

Fine said Disney and its Reedy Creek District were not the target of the bill, but Disney “chose to kick the hornet’s nest” leading to this legislation.

Disney could reapply to the legislature for its special district; otherwise, it would disband in June 2023. The measure allows for the reinstatement of the districts, leaving room to renegotiate its future.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All Rights Reserved.

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Self government

DeSantis Signs Legislation Dissolving Walt Disney World Self-Government

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a bill on Friday that dissolves private self-government at Walt Disney World.

The law eliminates the Reedy Creek Improvement District — as the 55-year-old Disney government is known — along with a handful of other similar districts statewide by June 2023.

The measure allows neighborhoods to potentially be reinstated, leaving Disney room to renegotiate its future.

When Florida Republicans took action against Disney’s special ward, some said it created more problems than it solved.

“It could be a very conservative $1 billion,” said Florida Atlantic University professor Sophia Johan.

Johan talks about the cost to taxpayers in two Florida counties of the loss of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, more than $500 per person.

“If you cut their fire and security departments, will the counties take over or will there be significant unemployment?” John said.

That’s because undoing a special district, as they’re called, can be tricky.

There are currently more than 1,800 such districts in Florida, ranging from Disney to The Villages — which has 14 development districts — and smaller districts like the Lake Worth drainage district in Palm Beach County.

“Our job is to drain water from the neighborhood when it’s too wet and to retain water to preserve groundwater levels when it’s too dry,” said Tommy Stroud, executive director of the drainage district of Lake Worth.

The District of Stroud – which has existed for over 100 years – operates by assessing a tax on residents of the southeast county, which pays for the operation of over 500 canals.

This is also how the majority of these districts generally operate in the state, approved by lawmakers to provide a single, highly focused service, unlike Disney which operates as its own small town, making it difficult to disentangle.

“We’re dissolving one that’s extremely active,” Johan said.

Scripps content only 2022

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Self government

Disney self-government in jeopardy after Florida House vote

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — On Thursday, the Florida House of Representatives passed a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the entertainment giant over its opposition to a measure which critics have dubbed the ” don’t say gay ” right.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks have turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serve to make the relationship even worse between the Republican-led government and a major political player in the state. Disney did not return an email seeking comment on Thursday.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his last salvo in a culture war fought over policies involving race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The bill passed by the Legislature Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the 55-year-old Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure allows districts to be reinstated, leaving an avenue to renegotiate her future. The bill is now transferred to DeSantis’ office for enactment.

The vote ended a bitter three-day special legislative session in which lawmakers were tasked with passing a new map of Congress drawn by DeSantis, but also took up the Disney bill at the governor’s behest. Tensions erupted Thursday as Democrats staged a sit-in protest on the House floor against the map, prompting Republicans to walk out briefly.

Opponents of the new map chanted phrases about black voter suppression as GOP lawmakers returned and passed both bills

“It was clear that our demands and proposed solutions were not going to be heard, so he rushed in,” Democratic Rep. Fentrice Driskell said of Disney’s move.

The dispute with the company began with Disney’s criticism of a new law banning instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as instruction that is not ” appropriate for age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to hold the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

Democrats slammed Disney’s proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local landlords could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear. clear.

disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, reporting last year that it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

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Sovereignty

Florida lawmakers approve bill to dissolve self-governing Disney World

WASHINGTON — In May 2021, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) officially announced the worst year for anti-LGBTQ+ legislation in recent history. At the time, state lawmakers introduced more than 250 bills — from anti-trans sports legislation to religious denial measures — in state houses across the country, 17 of which were signed into law.

Now, LGBTQ+ rights in the states seem to be impacted even more. According to HRC, more than 300 anti-LGBTQ+ bills have surfaced in 36 legislatures. As legislation grows — 41 such measures were introduced in 2018 — the number of bills passed and enshrined in state law is also growing, though LGBTQ+ advocates often challenge the laws in court. .

Legislation overwhelmingly targets trans youth, the organization says, from blocking participation in sports to banning access to gender-affirming healthcare. Lawmakers have also attempted, and in some cases passed, legislation limiting how LGBTQ+ issues can be taught in schools and preventing trans children from using bathrooms that match their gender identity.

“2022 is on track to surpass last year’s record number of anti-transgender bills,” Cathryn Oakley, state legislative director and senior counsel at HRC, told the Blade, calling the “attacks ‘craven, baseless’ legislative action against trans youth and an effort to create more division, sow fear and excite radical right-wing voters at the expense of innocent children.

Supporters of the bills say they must “protect” parental rights, children and religious freedom. However, advocates and LGBTQ+ people continue to denounce the legislation as discriminatory and harmful.

One of the most talked about anti-LGBTQ+ measures this year has been Florida’s so-called “Don’t Say Gay” bill, which Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed into law last month. The legislation will ban classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through grade 3 if it survives legal challenges.

Days after DeSantis signed the bill, the first lawsuit against the measure emerged, arguing that the law “would deny an entire generation that LGBTQ people exist and have equal dignity.”

“This effort to control young minds through state censorship — and to demean LGBTQ lives by denying their reality — is a grave abuse of power,” the lawsuit states.

Since the Republican sponsors successfully pushed the bill through, other states have followed in Florida’s footsteps. Ohio, for example, introduced its version of the legislation about a week after DeSantis signed it.

In Alabama, Republican Gov. Kay Ivey signed an anti-trans restroom bill with a last-minute amendment to stop educators discussing gender identity and sexual orientation in kindergarten through 5th grade. year. Ivey didn’t stop there, also signing a bill that would ban gender-affirming care for minors.

As in Florida, LGBTQ+ advocates were quick to announce legal challenges to the legislation. Some of the most prominent LGBTQ+ and civil rights organizations – including the HRC, GLAD and the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) – have announced a legal challenge in federal court against the ban on gender-affirming care in Alabama.

In terms of legislation introduced, Tennessee has significantly outpaced other states, according to LGBTQ+ rights organization Freedom for All Americans. The group’s legislative tracker found more than 30 bills limiting LGBTQ+ rights in the state, including a “Don’t Say Gay” bill and a ban on LGBTQ-themed literature in schools. But, unlike other Republican-controlled states, none have made it out of the state house.

Arizona has also been a hot spot for anti-LGBTQ+ legislation, with at least 17 bills, according to Freedom for All Americans. In March, Republican Gov. Doug Ducey signed two bills limiting the rights of trans people in the state – one banning certain types of medical care for trans youth and the other preventing trans students from participating in school sports consistent with their gender identity.

“Across the country, moderate Republicans are struggling — and too often failing — to prevent dangerous extremists from taking control of their party,” Shannon Minter, legal director of the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR), told The Blade at the time, adding, “We risk seeing large segments of our nation give way to authoritarian extremism.”

In other states, anti-LGBTQ+ legislation has become law without the support of its governor, Democrat or Republican. In fact, two Republican governors vetoed anti-trans sports bills in late March.

Utah Governor Spencer Cox and Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb, both Republicans, vetoed a law banning trans youth from participating in sports. Cox said the bill had “several fundamental flaws and should be reconsidered,” while Holcomb said the measure was looking for a problem.

Ultimately, however, the Utah House overruled Cox’s veto a few days later. Holcomb’s veto still stands.

“This [Utah] The bill highlights an issue of “fairness” in school sports that simply does not exist – but its negative impacts on the mental health and wellbeing of trans and non-binary youth are very real said Sam Ames, director of advocacy and government affairs at the Trevor Project. “These young people already face disproportionate rates of bullying, depression and risk of suicide, and bills like this will only make matters worse.”

In recent weeks, two Democratic governors have vetoed anti-LGBTQ+ legislation from their Republican-controlled legislatures.

Democratic Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has vetoed legislation that would ban trans girls from playing on sports teams at Kentucky schools that match their gender identity from sixth grade through college. GOP lawmakers quickly reversed the decision.

“Shame on the Kentucky General Assembly for attacking trans kids today,” said Chris Hartman, executive director of the Equity Campaign. Shame on our Commonwealth lawmakers for passing the first explicitly anti-LGBTQ law in Kentucky in nearly a decade.

Kansas Democratic Governor Laura Kelly last weekend vetoed two anti-LGBTQ+ measures, the “Parents’ Bill of Rights” and “Equity in Women’s Sports” laws.

GOP lawmakers in Idaho decided last month to effectively kill a bill criminalizing gender-affirming care, one of the most extreme proposals in the country. It would have made it a crime – punishable by life in prison – to provide minors with hormones, puberty blockers or gender-affirming surgery.

In a statement, Idaho Senate Republicans said they “strongly” oppose “any sex reassignment and surgical manipulation of the natural sex” on minors. But they also wrote that the controversial legislation “undermines” a parent’s right to make medical decisions for their children.

“We believe in the rights of parents and that the best decisions about medical treatment options for children are made by parents, with the guidance and expertise of their doctor,” the senators wrote.

Texas is one of 14 states without anti-LGBTQ+ legislation, as the state only holds legislative sessions in odd-numbered years. However, the Lone Star State has made headlines for Republican Gov. Greg Abbott’s anti-Trans orders.

Abbott in February ordered the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) to investigate reports of gender-affirming care of minors as “child abuse.” The order followed an official notice from state Attorney General Ken Paxton that called the treatment a form of “child abuse” under Texas law.

Since then, two Texas judges have ruled against the policy — one in district court and the other after an appeal. Still, Paxton vows to keep fighting for order in court.

But even as Republican politicians continue to push to limit LGBTQ+ rights, many LGBTQ+ advocates, individuals, and allies vow to continue to fight discriminatory efforts, whether in court or on the streets.

“The Human Rights Campaign strongly condemns these harmful and potentially deadly bills and will continue to use every tool at our disposal to fight for the rights of transgender youth and all LGBTQ+ people,” Oakley said.

In a January 2022 poll by The Trevor Project, an organization that provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ youth under 25, and Morning Consult, more than two-thirds of LGBTQ youth said recent debates over state laws that target transgender people have negatively impacted their mental health.

“These findings underscore how recent politics and ongoing crises around the world can have a real negative impact on LGBTQ youth, a group that is consistently at significantly increased risk for depression, anxiety, and attempted suicide in because of how they are mistreated and stigmatized in society,” Amit Paley, CEO of The Trevor Project, said in a statement.

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Self government

Florida Legislature Votes to Remove Disney Self-Government

TALLAHASSEE, Florida. – The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the entertainment giant over its opposition to a as critics have dubbed it “Don’t Say Gay”.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks have turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serve to make the relationship even worse between the Republican-led government and a major political player in the state.

A d

[TRENDING: Bride, caterer arrested after guests at Longwood wedding say food was laced with marijuana | Become a News 6 Insider (it’s free!)]

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his last salvo in a culture war fought on politics such as race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The dispute with Disney involves the company’s criticism of a new law banning teaching about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as teaching that is not “appropriate to age or development”.

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In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to keep the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

Tax collector Scott Randolph said Orange County would also potentially take on $1 billion to $2 billion in bond debt.

The bill passed by the Legislature on Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure restores the districts, leaving an avenue to renegotiate its future. It is now moving to DeSantis’ office to be signed into law.

Osceola County officials released the following statement in response to the passage of the bill:

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“Now that the Legislature has passed a bill to disband the Reedy Creek Improvement District, the Osceola County government will begin an analysis to understand the impacts in preparation for this coming into effect, including the assessment of any cost changes to Osceola as a result. As Disney and Reedy Creek are self-contained, we do not know what tax liabilities will be burdened after June 2023. Over the years, Disney has been a strong community partner and we expect that relationship to continue as we work together to a transition plan.

Democrats slammed the proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local property owners could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear.

disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, reporting last year that it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

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The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All Rights Reserved.

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Self government

Florida lawmakers vote to scrap Disney self-government

(NewsNation) – Florida lawmakers on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would strip Walt Disney World of its power of self-government, giving Gov. Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the entertainment giant.

The move is a new level in DeSantis’ fight with Disney over his opposition to what critics call Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ law, which limits how Florida educators can discuss identity. gender and sexual orientation from kindergarten to third grade.

In March, Disney said it would support organizations that oppose the new law and suspend political donations in the state.

DeSantis called a special legislative session on redrawing the state’s congressional maps, adding a last-minute proclamation to end “all special districts that were enacted in Florida prior to 1968,” which includes the Reedy Creek Improvement Districta special tax district that allows Walt Disney World to oversee its property as a quasi-governmental agency.

It allows the company to control permits, firefighting, power generation and road maintenance at their 27,000-acre resort near Orlando.

“It turns out there are hundreds of them (special independent districts) across the state,” said Florida State Senator Tina Polsky, a Democrat who voted against the measure. “So in order to punish Disney, they figured out a way to distinguish the special independent Disney district from the others. And they decided that districts formed before 1968 and not reconstituted could be dissolved.

“There are actually five other special districts,” she said. “You know, they’re not as serious as Disney’s, Reedy Creek Indie Specialty, because it’s so huge.”

The bill would dissolve the special district on June 1, 2023.

The bill passed by the legislature allows the reinstatement of the districts, leaving an opportunity to renegotiate its future

Florida’s House and Senate are both controlled by Republicans. The bill passed the state Senate on Wednesday and is now moving to DeSantis’ office for enactment.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks have turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations.

“That means higher taxes,” Dr. Charles Zelden said on Thursday’s “Rush Hour” show.

Zelden is a professor in the Department of Humanities and Political Sciences at Nova Southeastern University and says residents’ pockets will be among the first things affected.

“Now local taxpayers are going to have to pay for this, unlike those who pay fees and buy tickets at Disney,” Zelden said.

According to Polsky, if no action is taken by the legislature next year, these independent special districts will dissolve and they will have to be absorbed into the counties and cities in which they are physically located.

“Part of reabsorbing these areas is that they’re absorbing debt,” Polsky said. “So this could all be passed on to ratepayers in Orange and Osceola counties. So that’s the concern. »

A Republican state senator told NewsNation that removing Disney’s mini-government could increase property taxes for property owners near Disney by 15-20%.

“That’s why fast-tracking or delaying 12 months,” said State Senator Manny Díaz, a Republican.

Democrats slammed the proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local property owners could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear.

“Reedy Creek’s debt service alone is over $1 billion,” said State Sen. Gary Farmer, a Democrat. “This bill does not contain any provision on how this debt service will be met.”

“I call it revenge governance,” Polsky said.

But not all Florida politicians are opposed to DeSantis’ decision. State Sen. Manny Diaz Jr. told “NewsNation Prime” on Thursday that it was not a dig at Disney.

“I think what’s going on, like Governor DeSantis said, we shouldn’t be giving special privileges to private citizens,” Diaz Jr. said.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney of 27,000 acres in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s.

Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

Disney has yet to comment on the vote.

The Hill and Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Sovereignty

Florida passes bill to end Disney self-government in the state

The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday passed a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis a victory in his row with the entertainment giant over its opposition to a measure that critics have nicknamed the “Don”. “don’t say gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has transformed Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations over the decades, and serves to further sour relations between the government-run by Republicans and a major political player in the state.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against politics involving race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The dispute with Disney began with the company’s criticism of a new law banning teaching about sexual orientation and gender identity in kindergarten through third grade as well as teaching that is not ” appropriate for age or development”.

“Business awakening”

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote during a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we want the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys to be held to account, we need to stick together now.”

The bill passed by the Legislature on Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure leaves room for the restoration of districts, with a Republican legislative leader signaling a likely restructuring of a 1967 deal lawmakers reached with the company that allows it to provide services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities and infrastructure .

Democrats have warned the move could result in hefty tax bills for local property owners if they were to absorb Disney bond debt — though those details are far from clear.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, pictured here in February 2022 in Miami, pushed for passage of the bill. (Marta Lavandier/Associated Press)

“Punitive and petulant political return”

Democrats, the minority party in the Florida legislature, opposed the proposal as a clear retaliation against a company that has been a major economic driver in the state.

“Let’s call it what it is: it’s a petulant, punishing political comeback from a company that dared to say the Emperor has no clothes, but if they perform well in the next election cycle, may -maybe we’ll put it back in place,” the senator said. Gary M. Farmer, a Democrat.

Disney did not return an email seeking comment. The company is one of Florida’s largest private employers and last year said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It’s not immediately clear how Disney or neighboring governments would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, and the control it gave Disney over 11,000 acres in Florida, was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. of the company said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

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Sovereignty

Disney self-government in jeopardy after Florida House vote | Florida News

By ANTHONY IZAGUIRRE, Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Governor Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the giant. Entertainment for opposing a measure that critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serves to further sour relations between the Republican-led government and a major political actor in the state. Disney did not return an email seeking comment on Thursday.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against politics involving race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The bill passed by the Legislature Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the 55-year-old Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure allows districts to be reinstated, leaving an avenue to renegotiate her future. The bill is now transferred to DeSantis’ office for enactment.

political cartoons

The vote ended a bitter three-day special legislative session in which lawmakers were tasked with passing a new map of Congress drawn by DeSantis, but also took up the Disney bill at the governor’s behest. Tensions erupted Thursday as Democrats staged a sit-in protest on the House floor against the map, prompting Republicans to walk out briefly.

Opponents of the new map chanted phrases about black voter suppression as GOP lawmakers returned and passed both bills

“It was clear that our demands and proposed solutions were not going to be heard, so he rushed in,” Democratic Rep. Fentrice Driskell said of Disney’s move.

The dispute with the company began with Disney’s criticism of a new law banning instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as instruction that is not ” appropriate for age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to hold the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

Democrats slammed Disney’s proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local landlords could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear. clear.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Sovereignty

Disney self-government in jeopardy after Florida House vote | National and world news

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — On Thursday, the Florida House of Representatives passed a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the entertainment giant over its opposition to a measure which critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serves to further sour relations between the Republican-led government and a major political actor in the state. Disney did not return an email seeking comment on Thursday.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against politics involving race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The bill passed by the Legislature Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the 55-year-old Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure allows districts to be reinstated, leaving an avenue to renegotiate her future. The bill is now transferred to DeSantis’ office for enactment.

The vote ended a bitter three-day special legislative session in which lawmakers were tasked with passing a new map of Congress drawn by DeSantis, but also took up the Disney bill at the governor’s behest. Tensions erupted Thursday as Democrats staged a sit-in protest on the House floor against the map, prompting Republicans to walk out briefly.

Opponents of the new map chanted phrases about black voter suppression as GOP lawmakers returned and passed both bills

“It was clear that our demands and proposed solutions were not going to be heard, so he rushed in,” Democratic Rep. Fentrice Driskell said of Disney’s move.

The dispute with the company began with Disney’s criticism of a new law banning instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as instruction that is not ” appropriate for age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to keep the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”


TV ad invokes the devil, the Joker as Russell Fry lambastes GOP opponent Tom Rice as a

Democrats slammed Disney’s proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local landlords could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear. clear.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

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Self government

Florida Legislature Votes To Strip Disney Of Self-Government After Opposition To ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Governor Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the giant. Entertainment for opposing a measure that critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serves to further sour relations between the Republican-led government and a major political actor in the state.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against policies such as race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the most popular GOP politicians in the country. and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The dispute with Disney involves the company’s criticism of a new law banning teaching about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as teaching that is not “appropriate to age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to keep the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

The bill passed by the Legislature on Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure restores the districts, leaving an avenue to renegotiate its future. It is now moving to DeSantis’ office to be signed into law.

Democrats slammed the proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local property owners could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida House of Representatives on Thursday gave final passage to a bill that would dissolve the private government of Walt Disney World, giving Republican Governor Ron DeSantis a victory in his feud with the giant. entertainment for opposing a measure that critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The move could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose string of theme parks has turned Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, and serves to further sour relations between the Republican-led government and a major political actor in the state. Disney did not return an email seeking comment on Thursday.

For DeSantis, the attack on Disney is his latest salvo in a culture war waged against politics involving race, gender and the coronavirus, battles that have made him one of the nation’s most popular GOP politicians and a likely 2024 presidential candidate.

The bill passed by the Legislature Thursday would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the 55-year-old Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure allows districts to be reinstated, leaving an avenue to renegotiate her future. The bill is now transferred to DeSantis’ office for enactment.

The vote ended a bitter three-day special legislative session in which lawmakers were tasked with passing a new map of Congress drawn by DeSantis, but also took up the Disney bill at the governor’s behest. Tensions erupted Thursday as Democrats staged a sit-in protest on the House floor against the map, prompting Republicans to walk out briefly.

READ MORE: Florida governor signs law banning abortion after 15 weeks

Opponents of the new map chanted phrases about black voter suppression as GOP lawmakers returned and passed both bills

“It was clear that our demands and proposed solutions were not going to be heard, so he rushed in,” Democratic Rep. Fentrice Driskell said of Disney’s move.

The dispute with the company began with Disney’s criticism of a new law banning instruction about sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten through third grade as well as instruction that is not ” appropriate for age or development”.

In March, Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state and added that it would in turn support organizations that oppose the new law. DeSantis and his fellow Republicans then lambasted Disney and defended the law as reasonable.

“Disney and other woke corporations will no longer get away with peddling their unchecked pressure campaigns,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising pitch Wednesday. “If we’re going to keep the Democratic machine and its corporate lackeys accountable, we need to unite now.”

Democrats slammed Disney’s proposal as clear retaliation against the company and warned local landlords could be hit with big tax bills if they were to absorb Disney’s bond debt – though those details are far from clear. clear.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers, saying last year it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It is not immediately clear how the company or local governments around its properties would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

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Self government

Florida Senate Strips Disney of Self-Government Over ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Critics

The Florida Senate voted on Wednesday strip the Walt Disney Company of special privileges in regulating and maintaining 38 square miles of central Florida, home to its six theme parks and resorts.

The 23-16 vote on SB 4 came a day after Governor Ron DeSantis said he wants the Legislature to repeal the governance structure for Disney properties in Florida.

The entertainment giant was caught up in the election-year culture war when its CEO pledged to work to repeal the Parental Rights in Education Act – which opponents decried as the “Don’t don’t say gay.

As lawmakers debated the measure, the DeSantis campaign for governor sent in a fundraising pitch stating that Disney had chosen to fight “the wrong guy” and for contributors to “join the fight against corruption.” democratic machine and awaken the leaders of Disney”.

Democrats protested Republicans’ rush to punish the state’s largest private employer for political speech that degraded the legislative process.

“With all due respect, this is not a meaningful legislative review. It’s a punishment. This is political theater, and we are better than that,” said Sen. Loranne Ausley, D-Tallahassee.

DeSantis vs. Disney:

Sen. Jennifer Bradley’s R-Green Cove measure includes a carrot-and-stick approach in that it won’t go into effect until June 2023, enough time for Disney, in the words of the sponsor. of the House, Rep. Randy Fine, R-Brevard, to reconsider his criticism of the Florida law.

“It’s a bit like parents imposing restrictions on their children. Clean up your act, apologize, say you’re sorry, and agree to change your behavior. Maybe you’ll get your phone or other privileges back” , observed Ausley.

At issue is the Reedy Creek Improvement District, a special district established in 1967 that provides Disney with unprecedented tax and regulatory authority to build an entertainment empire that has become the world’s number one tourist attraction.

The House and Senate repeal sponsors argue that Disney is not in compliance with a 1997 law that required districts to seek recodification. Disney would have a year to put its paperwork in order and ask the legislature to reauthorize Reedy Creek.

‘I let you down’:Disney CEO apologizes for response to ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill

DeSantis vs. Disney:DeSantis Says He’ll Sign So-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill Soon, Criticizes Disney Again

The GOP follows suit:Fetterhoff and Barnaby return contributions to Disney for ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill

“Everyone in this room knows it’s not going to happen”

Sen. Jason Pizzo, D-Fort Lauderdale, complained during the debate that the Legislative Assembly was wasting everyone’s time.

If Reedy Creek were dissolved, he pointed out, Orange and Osceola counties would have to shoulder more than $1 billion in debt and be responsible for maintaining a network of roads and facilities. wastewater treatment plant, as well as a 3,000-member fire and paramedic team.

“Everyone in this room knows that’s not going to happen,” Pizzo said of saddled two counties with billions in debt.

Pizzo told Bradley he was sorry she had to “do some penance” for voting no against “Don’t Say Gay” by sponsoring Disney’s repeal measure.

Addressing the Republican majority, he said they struggled to explain to people what lawmakers are doing in Tallahassee: “When we’re here for special sessions, we get spoon-fed bills that none of you didn’t write, that neither of you had any input on, then have to pass.

Bradley responded that the Legislature will make sure the “parade of horribles” described by Democrats does not happen.

Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson said Disney and the state will take a “deep dive” over the next year to prepare for the dissolution of Reedy Creek.

“The folks at Disney are going to get their legal team together. They’re going to meet with our legal team, the House, the Senate, and the governor’s office. We’re going to get the teams together to start coming up with a plan,” Simpson said.

Rep. Spencer Roach, R-Fort Myers, has lobbied to review the Reedy Creek layout because he believes it gives Disney an unfair advantage over other theme parks.

“I have a theme park in my district. It’s the oldest and oldest tourist amusement center in southwest Florida, called Shell Factory. They would like to have their own government, but that’s not It’s not,” Roach said, portraying the battle as one between a “cockroach and a mouse.”

The House accepted the Senate bill on Wednesday afternoon, and Speaker Chris Sprows said the chambers would consider it Thursday morning.

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Self government

Florida Senate passes bill to end Disney self-government – ​​Winnipeg Free Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida Senate on Wednesday passed a bill to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to run private government on its properties in the state, escalating a feud with the entertainment giant over for his opposition to what critics call the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The proposal could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks has transformed Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations over the decades. And Democrats have warned that the move could result in hefty tax bills for local property owners if they were to absorb Disney bond debt — though those details are far from clear.

The measures, pushed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, come as the governor tussles with Disney over the company’s criticism of a new GOP law banning instruction about the woman’s sexual orientation and gender identity. Kindergarten to Grade 3 and instruction that is not “age appropriate”. or appropriate for development.

FILE – The newly painted Cinderella’s Castle at Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom is seen with the crest to celebrate the theme park’s 50th anniversary Monday, August 30, 2021 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The idea was pitched to Florida lawmakers 55 years ago: Let Disney form its own government and in exchange, it would create a futuristic city of tomorrow. This city never materialized, but Walt Disney World became an economic juggernaut and its government retained unprecedented powers. Five decades later, Governor Ron DeSantis is asking lawmakers to end the government of Disney in a move that throws a spanner in decades of symbiotic relationship between the company and the state government. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)

The bill would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure leaves room for reinstating districts, a legislative leader Republican signaling likely restructuring. from a 1967 agreement lawmakers reached with the company that allows it to provide services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities and infrastructure.

“By doing it so soon, we have until next June or July for this, so we’re giving ourselves more time to think,” Republican Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson told reporters after the vote. “I don’t know how the end will come, but I know it’s a very worthwhile process that we’re taking and I think whatever comes out of it will be better than what we have today.”

Yet the move represents the latest blow to a culture war being waged by DeSantis as he runs for re-election and strengthens himself as a potential 2024 GOP presidential candidate thanks to fierce opposition to liberal policies on race. , sex and abortion.

FILE – The newly painted Cinderella’s Castle at Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom is seen with the crest to celebrate the theme park’s 50th anniversary Monday, August 30, 2021 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The idea was pitched to Florida lawmakers 55 years ago: Let Disney form its own government and in exchange, it would create a futuristic city of tomorrow. This city never materialized, but Walt Disney World became an economic juggernaut and its government retained unprecedented powers. Five decades later, Governor Ron DeSantis is asking lawmakers to end the government of Disney in a move that throws a spanner in decades of symbiotic relationship between the company and the state government. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)

“If Disney wants to fight, they picked the wrong guy,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising email Wednesday. “As governor, I was elected to put the people of Florida first, and I will not allow an awakened California-based corporation to run our state.”

Democrats, the minority party in the Legislature, opposed the proposal as a clear retaliation against a company that has been a major economic driver in the state.

“Let’s call it that, it’s a punishing, petulant political comeback from a company that dared to say the Emperor has no clothes, but if they perform well in the next election cycle, maybe that we will put it back together,” Sen said. Gary M. Farmer, a Democrat.

Rep. Kristen Aston Arrington, D-Kissimmee, asks Rep. Randy Fine, R-Palm Bay, a question about his Bill 3-C: Independent Special Districts in the House of Representatives Wednesday, April 20, 2022, at the Tallahassee Capitol , Florida. A companion bill, which could dissolve Disney’s Special District, has passed the Senate and the House is due to vote on it Thursday. (AP Photo/Phil Sears)

Disney did not return an email seeking comment. The company is one of Florida’s largest private employers and last year said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It’s not immediately clear how Disney or neighboring governments would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The push to punish Disney came after it announced it would suspend political donations in the state and said it was committed to supporting organizations that oppose the state’s new law limiting orientation or gender identification in the classroom.

DeSantis and other Republicans have lambasted Disney and other critics of the law, arguing that the policy is reasonable and that parents, not teachers, should raise these topics with children.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

The Florida House of Representatives is expected to consider the bill Thursday.

___

Associated Press writer Brendan Farrington contributed to this report

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Home rule

Beach mayors cite threat of erosion of autonomy | Beaches

MADEIRA BEACH — The state legislature is eroding the self-governing powers of beach communities in Pinellas County as they deal with the effects of short-term rentals in their neighborhoods.

That was the consensus of six beach mayors as they gathered April 14 for a “State of the Beaches” town hall, presented by the Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions at St. Petersburg College.

The self-rule dispute with Tallahassee was one of many issues the mayors were united on, including dealing with the effects of red tide and tidal flooding and residents’ complaints about ongoing development.

Redington Beach Mayor David Will noted that his town is all-residential and “transient tenancy is a hot issue” in his community.

Problematic transient rentals are often owned by people from out of state, St. Pete Beach Mayor Al Johnson said, adding that the lack of a rule of origin is “ruining a person’s quality of life.” out-of-town investor.

Tyler Payne, Mayor of Treasure Island, said towns in Pinellas County were suffering from the erosion of the domestic regime because the state felt it had to step in and deal with problems caused by municipalities and counties in the south Florida.

Madeira Beach Mayor John Hendricks echoed the sentiment of other mayors when he said there was so much to do; he wanted residents to realize that if cities don’t generate revenue through managed growth, tourism, business and development, the only other way is to raise ad valorem taxes.

“We need to generate revenue, some people have moved to heaven and kind of expect us to lift the drawbridge and not let anyone else in,” he said. One of the main concerns is traffic in a tourist area. “People who moved here expected traffic not to move to the wrong area,” he added.

“It’s a balancing act,” Johnson said, “between being a Gulf Coast beach town and an internationally renowned tourist destination.”

Payne said his city is keeping an open mind toward development, “because that’s how we’re going to increase the tax base, so residents don’t carry the burden of funding services, but we don’t have to be like Clearwater”.

The mayors agreed that much of their capital budget was spent on infrastructure needs, improving stormwater systems and adding expensive equipment to prevent tidal flooding.

Payne and Gulfport Mayor Samuel Henderson noted they were installing living shorelines, rather than expensive seawalls, to help control flooding from storm surges, while Redington Beach and St. Pete Beach were busy installing control values ​​and deflector boxes in their sewer system to stop tidal flooding. to come to the streets.

Johnson said his city is taking a different approach to stormwater and sunny day flooding caused by high tides by “focusing on saltwater protection.” The city is upgrading its drainage systems with baffle boxes and control values. Redington Beach is currently beginning much the same process to control tidal flooding as St. Pete Beach.

While beach towns would love to see another Army Corps of Engineers renovation project, a big problem at Madeira Beach is tidal silt and sand flowing into Johns Pass and Blind Pass, clogging the waterway and undermining the attraction of the city promenade. Mayor Hendricks explained that Johns Pass was so banked that storm waves and sand were dragging under the Johns Pass boardwalk.

Redington Shores Mayor Marybeth Henderson echoed another issue affecting all beaches is “red tide and how are we going to deal with it”. She noted that with rising property values, cities don’t have to increase their mileage rates, but added that she wasn’t sure how long that might continue.

Madeira Beach Mayor Hendricks noted that, more than hurricanes, he’s worried about dealing with red tide and COVID-19 because “we’re a tourist destination.” He noted that visitor parking on Madeira Beach represents about $2 million in revenue for his city.

The mayor of Madeira Beach said another issue is the misinformation some people have been spreading about a developer’s attempt to build a seven-story hotel that would include two health care facilities. Often residents oppose development projects that add taxpayer money to city coffers, he said.

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Sovereignty

Explained: DeSantis’ efforts to end Disney’s self-government power

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (right) is trying to strip Walt Disney World, ‘the most magical place on earth’, of its power of self-government amid an ongoing battle with top sources of state revenue.

DeSantis announced Tuesday that he would call a special legislative session to end “all special districts that were enacted in Florida prior to 1968,” including the Reedy Creek Improvement District, a special tax district that allows Walt Disney World to oversee its ownership as a quasi-governmental agency.

The move is a new level in DeSantis’ fight against the tourism giant over Disney’s opposition to what critics call Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” law, which limits how Florida educators can discuss gender identity and sexual orientation from kindergarten to third grade.

Why did Florida give special status to Disney?

Disney has been self-governing for over 50 years. In 1967, the Florida State Legislature created the Reedy Creek Improvement District (RCID) which acts with the same authority and responsibility as a county government.

According to historical records, the government created two municipalities within the RCID – Bay Lake and Reedy Creek, later named Lake Buena Vista – nestled between Orange and Osceola counties.

Since Walt Disney World is the primary landowner of RCID, it is solely responsible for paying the cost of providing municipal services such as power, water, roads, and fire protection. Walt Disney pushed for the creation of this neighborhood because the closest power and water lines were 10 to 15 miles away.

With this special status, Disney was able to construct roads and buildings and provide services without seeking permission from a county government. Residents of Orange and Osceola counties do not pay taxes for these services unless they are residents of the district.

How does the government dissolve a special district?

DeSantis asserted in his proclamation that the Florida Constitution “prohibits special laws granting privileges to private corporations” and that “it is necessary to review these special independent districts to ensure that they properly serve the public interest.” .

State Representative Randy Fine (R) submitted a bill to the House and State Senator Jennifer Bradley (R) submitted a bill to the Florida Senate, which passed Wednesday. The bill would dissolve the RCID and five other special districts that have not been recodified by the legislature as required by law.

According to the bill, districts would be dissolved effective June 1, 2023. However, they could reapply to be recognized as a special district again.

“Disney is invited to Florida”, Fine tweeted tuesday, claiming that Disney is exempt from the laws that ordinary Floridians face. “Today we remind them.”

But dissolving the RCID may not be so easy. According to state law, once the Senate and House pass the bill with the governor’s signature, the majority of owners in the district must vote to disband the district, and since most residents of RCID are employed by Disney, this scenario would be unlikely.

Terry Lewis, a lawyer specializing in special district law, told WFTV Channel 9 that Disney could not use this legal basis because there had never been a referendum to create RCID.

“They’re doing this because the governor has a glass jaw and unfortunately the members of the legislature who represent the majority, they give in to him having a very public and costly tantrum,” the state representative said. Mike Grieco (D). Hill in an interview.

What would happen if Reedy Creek was disbanded?

Democrats fear that if DeSantis succeeds in removing Disney’s special status, taxpayers in Orange and Osceola counties will be held liable for a huge debt.

According to RCID’s annual financial report for 2021, it carries a debt of nearly $1 billion. As required by Florida law, all of this debt would be borne by Orange and Osceola counties.

“So it’s not guesswork, it’s not conjecture, it’s Florida law that says these 1.7 million people are going to have to pick up this bill,” the chief said. of the minority in the Senate, Gary Farmer (D).

According to Farmer’s estimates, each family in Orange and Osceola Counties would likely pay more than $2,200 if the counties assumed the debt.

Taxpayers would also become liable for items that Disney currently pays for, such as road improvements and other mandatory utilities. Battles between taxpayers and county governments would become more likely, such as the outrage seen when Orange County approved a controversial $125 million road deal with Universal Studios of Orlando.

“If they take Reedy Creek out, that responsibility will go to a government,” Sen. Linda Stewart (D) told the Orlando Sentinel. “And the government will not be reimbursed for what it has to pick up and take care of.”

Orange County Comptroller Phil Diamond told Florida’s News 6 they are monitoring the situation because it will have a “very significant impact” on ratepayers.

Why now?

DeSantis said Disney was “alienating a lot of people” over its opposition to the so-called Don’t Say Gay Act, after Disney CEO Bob Chapek announced the company would suspend political donations.

Chapek received backlash from his employees for not immediately criticizing the bill when it was first introduced, with some walkouts.

“It’s clear that this is not just an issue with a bill in Florida, but rather another challenge to basic human rights.” You needed me to be a stronger ally in the fight for equal rights and I let you down,” Chapek said. “I am sorry.”

Besides the battle between Chapek and DeSantis, Democratic State Rep. Grieco accused Republicans of doing it now because they’re trying to distract critics from the newly drawn map of Congress.

DeSantis initially called for the special legislative session to approve his map of Congress – adopted by the Senate on Wednesday – which has been denounced by black lawmakers as “openly racist” because it would reduce the number of precincts where black voters are a plurality .

“They are blatantly trying to eliminate two or more black representative districts,” Grieco said. “They were getting so much bullshit for it, wiped out, so – these guys aren’t stupid – it’s deviation.”

But Republicans are defending the measure as a move to resist Disney’s “wake-up call.”

“Look, there are political differences, and that’s okay,” DeSantis said on Fox News. “But when you try to impose a woke ideology on our state, we see that as a significant threat.”

“Disgracefully, Disney has betrayed us, and the company Walt Disney created – which was a beacon of family values ​​- has now been perverted by a woke mob of liberal extremists into a laboratory for social experimentation on gender identity. ” Rep. Jackie Toledo (R) said.

But Disney historian and author Aaron Goldberg doesn’t think Republicans’ criticism of Disney will stop people from going there, including those who agree with the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

“Think about your average regular family — Walt Disney World and Disneyland is a rite of passage,” Goldberg said. “I really think Disney is the biggest purveyor of nostalgia in the world and that’s how they suck you in.”

The Hill has reached out to Disney’s legal team for additional comment.

Updated at 4:03 p.m.

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Self government

Florida Senate Passes Bill to End Disney Self-Government – Twin Cities

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida Senate on Wednesday passed a bill to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to operate private government on its properties in the state, escalating a feud with the entertainment giant over its opposition to what critics call the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

The proposal could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks has transformed Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations over the decades. And Democrats have warned that the move could result in hefty tax bills for local property owners if they were to absorb Disney bond debt — though those details are far from clear.

The measures, pushed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, come as the governor tussles with Disney over the company’s criticism of a new GOP law banning instruction about the woman’s sexual orientation and gender identity. Kindergarten to Grade 3 and instruction that is not “age appropriate”. or appropriate for development.

The bill would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure leaves room for reinstating districts, a legislative leader Republican signaling likely restructuring. from a 1967 agreement lawmakers reached with the company that allows it to provide services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities and infrastructure.

“By doing it so soon, we have until next June or July for this, so we’re giving ourselves more time to think,” Republican Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson told reporters after the vote. “I don’t know how the end will come, but I know it’s a very worthwhile process that we’re taking and I think whatever comes out of it will be better than what we have today.”

Yet the move represents the latest blow to a culture war being waged by DeSantis as he runs for re-election and strengthens himself as a potential 2024 GOP presidential candidate thanks to fierce opposition to liberal policies on race. , sex and abortion.

“If Disney wants to fight, they picked the wrong guy,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising email Wednesday. “As governor, I was elected to put the people of Florida first, and I will not allow an awakened California-based corporation to run our state.”

Democrats, the minority party in the Legislature, opposed the proposal as a clear retaliation against a company that has been a major economic driver in the state.

“Let’s call it that, it’s a punishing and petulant political comeback from a company that dared to say the Emperor had no clothes, but if they perform well in the next election cycle, maybe that we will put it back together,” Sen said. Gary M. Farmer, a Democrat.

Disney did not return an email seeking comment. The company is one of Florida’s largest private employers and last year said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It’s not immediately clear how Disney or neighboring governments would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The push to punish Disney came after it announced it would suspend political donations in the state and said it was committed to supporting organizations working to oppose the state’s new law limiting the sexual orientation or gender identification in classrooms.

DeSantis and other Republicans have lambasted Disney and other critics of the law, arguing that the policy is reasonable and that parents, not teachers, should raise these topics with children.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

The Florida House of Representatives is expected to consider the bill Thursday.

___

Associated Press writer Brendan Farrington contributed to this report

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Self government

Florida Senate passes bill to end Disney self-government

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Florida Senate on Wednesday passed a bill to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to operate a private government on its properties in the stateescalating a row with the entertainment giant over its opposition to what critics are calling the “ don’t say gay ” right.

The proposal could have huge tax implications for Disney, whose series of theme parks has transformed Orlando into one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations over the decades. And Democrats have warned that the move could result in hefty tax bills for local property owners if they were to absorb Disney bond debt — though those details are far from clear.

The measures, pushed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, come as the governor tussles with Disney over the company’s criticism of a new GOP law banning instruction about the woman’s sexual orientation and gender identity. Kindergarten to Grade 3 and instruction that is not “age appropriate”. or appropriate for development.

The bill would eliminate the Reedy Creek Improvement District, as the Disney government is known, along with a handful of other similar districts by June 2023. The measure leaves room for reinstating districts, a legislative leader Republican signaling likely restructuring. from a 1967 agreement lawmakers reached with the company that allows it to provide services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities and infrastructure.

“By doing it so soon, we have until next June or July for this, so we’re giving ourselves more time to think,” Republican Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson told reporters after the vote. “I don’t know how the end will come, but I know it’s a very worthwhile process that we’re taking and I think whatever comes out of it will be better than what we have today.”

Yet the move represents the latest blow to a culture war being waged by DeSantis as he runs for re-election and strengthens himself as a potential 2024 GOP presidential candidate thanks to fierce opposition to liberal policies on race. , sex and abortion.

“If Disney wants to fight, they picked the wrong guy,” DeSantis wrote in a fundraising email Wednesday. “As governor, I was elected to put the people of Florida first, and I will not allow an awakened California-based corporation to run our state.”

Democrats, the minority party in the Legislature, opposed the proposal as a clear retaliation against a company that has been a major economic driver in the state.

“Let’s call it that, it’s a punishing and petulant political comeback from a company that dared to say the Emperor had no clothes, but if they perform well in the next election cycle, maybe that we will put it back together,” Sen said. Gary M. Farmer, a Democrat.

Disney did not return an email seeking comment. The company is one of Florida’s largest private employers and last year said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. It’s not immediately clear how Disney or neighboring governments would be affected if the district were disbanded.

The push to punish Disney came after announcing it would suspend political donations in the state and said he is committed to supporting organizations that oppose the state’s new law limiting sexual orientation or gender identification in classrooms.

DeSantis and other Republicans have lambasted Disney and other critics of the law, arguing that the policy is reasonable and that parents, not teachers, should raise these topics with children.

The creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District and the control it gave disney more than 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida, was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Company officials said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an Epcot theme park.

The Florida House of Representatives is expected to consider the bill Thursday.

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Sovereignty

Disney could be stripped of its power of self-government, DeSantis says

Gov. Ron DeSantis held a news conference Tuesday morning at the Villages. The governor began by announcing that lawmakers would consider ending Disney’s Reedy Creek Improvement District during this week’s special session. DeSantis issued a proclamation calling for the expansion of the special session to include considering ending all special districts enacted in Florida prior to 1968. Years before Cinderella’s Castle opened, Walt Disney himself proposed to State lawmakers that Disney World should have governmental authority over the territory. Months after his death in December 1966, the Governor and Legislature in 1967 granted the company, under the leadership of Walt’s brother Roy, the creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, to govern the property that would eventually become DisneyWorld. Disney’s independence has been under the microscope following the company’s denunciation of Florida’s new “parental rights in education” law, or the “Don’t Say Gay” law. In a tweet, State Rep. Spencer Roach, who represents the North Fort Myers area, wrote that lawmakers have already met twice to discuss repealing the Reedy Creek Improvement Act. “If Disney wants to embrace the ‘woke’ ideology, it seems appropriate that they be regulated by Orange County,” Roach said. “DeSantis went on to say that higher education needs to be affordable and people need to be aware of other pathways. He was joined by Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson and House Speaker Chris Sprows.

Governor Ron DeSantis held a press conference Tuesday morning in The Villages.

The governor began by announcing that lawmakers would consider ending Disney’s Reedy Creek Improvement District during this week’s special session.

DeSantis issued a proclamation calling for the expansion of the special session to include consideration of the termination of all special districts enacted in Florida prior to 1968.

Years before Cinderella Castle opened, Walt Disney himself proposed to state legislators that Disney World have authority over the territory. Months after his death in December 1966, the Governor and the 1967 Legislature granted the corporation, under the leadership of Walt’s brother Roy, the creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, to govern the property that would eventually become Disney World.

Disney’s independence has come under scrutiny following the company’s denunciation of Florida’s new “Parental Rights in Education” law, or the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

In a tweet, State Rep. Spencer Roach, who represents the North Fort Myers area, wrote that lawmakers have already met twice to discuss repealing the Reedy Creek Improvement Act.

“If Disney wants to embrace the ‘woke’ ideology, it seems appropriate that they be regulated by Orange County,” Roach said.

What else was discussed at the press conference?

DeSantis went on to say that higher education needs to be affordable and people need to be aware of other pathways. He was joined by Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, Senate Speaker Wilton Simpson and House Speaker Chris Sprows.

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Self government

Florida Governor DeSantis pushes to end Disney self-government – Winnipeg Free Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Governor Ron DeSantis on Tuesday asked the Legislature to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to run private government on its properties in the state, the latest volley of a feud between the governor and the entertainment giant over what critics dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

DeSantis, an ascendant GOP governor and potential 2024 presidential candidate, has battled with Disney over the company’s opposition to the new law banning sexual orientation and gender identity instructions from kindergarten through third grade.

On Tuesday, DeSantis upped the ante.

FILE – The Walt Disney Co. logo appears on a screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange August 7, 2017. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 asked the Legislature to to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to operate a private government on its properties in the state, the latest salvo in a feud between the Republican and the media giant. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

As lawmakers returned to the Capitol for a special legislative session on redistricting Congress, the governor issued a proclamation that allows the GOP-controlled statehouse to accept bills eliminating the autonomous district of Disney. Republicans quickly tabled proposals to this effect.

“I’m announcing today that we’re expanding the appeal of what they’re going to be considering this week. And so, yes, they’ll be looking at the map of Congress, but they’ll also be looking at terminating any special districts that have been enacted into law. in Florida before 1968, and that includes the Reedy Creek Improvement District,” DeSantis said at a press conference, referring to the company’s administrative district without mentioning Disney by name. not precised.

Disney representatives did not return an email request for comment on Tuesday. It was not immediately clear how eliminating the district would affect the company or neighboring governments.

The Reedy Creek Improvement District is a private government controlled by Disney World and established by the state legislature in 1967 which enables it to provide government services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities and services. infrastructure.

The creation of the district and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Officials of the company said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an EPCOT theme park.

The push to punish the company comes after Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state due to the new Parental Rights in Education Act. Opponents have dubbed the law “Don’t Say Gay”, arguing that banning classes on sexual orientation and gender identity in the early years would marginalize LGBTQ people.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers: Last year, the company said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. LGBTQ advocates who work for the company criticized CEO Bob Chapek for what they said was his slowness to speak out against the bill. Some left work in protest.

DeSantis has repeatedly lambasted Disney and critics of the law, attracting considerable attention in conservative media circles. He insists the policy is reasonable and says parents, not teachers, should bring up the topics of sexual orientation and gender identity with children.

Republican lawmakers seem receptive to punishing Disney, tabling proposals that would disband the district by June 2023. DeSantis has been a powerful governor, effectively pushing his priorities in the statehouse, and GOP Senate chairman and president of the House are supporting him on the Disney issue.

Democrats were quick to criticize the governor’s decision in retaliation for the company’s stance on the education bill. Some have pointed out that Disney has been a major economic driver in the state.

“What world are we living in right now? asked Democratic Senator Audrey Gibson. “It’s Florida’s state of freedom. If they don’t agree with the Governor, he pulls out the Gatling gun.

Richard Foglesong, a retired Rollins College political scientist whose book, ‘Married to the Mouse’ chronicles the formation of Reedy Creek, said he initially thought ‘cooler heads would prevail’ in the war of words between DeSantis and Disney.

“I think I was wrong. I overestimated — or underestimated — Governor DeSantis,” Foglesong said. “I see it as a legitimate threat.”

___

Associated Press writers Brendan Farrington in Tallahassee and Mike Schneider in Orlando contributed to this report.

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Sovereignty

Colin Copus: Local government is not local autonomy

A new Council of Europe report highlights the limits of local power in the UK, writes the Emeritus Professor of Local Politics at De Montfort University and Visiting Professor at Ghent University.

The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe has just published its report on this country’s compliance with the Charter of Local Self-Government, signed in 1998, and it is not a pleasure to read – not for localists in any case.

Colin Copus, Emeritus Professor of Local Politics at De Montfort University and Visiting Professor at Ghent University

Although the report acknowledges that some movement has occurred since the last assessment in 2013, the issues of concern raised at the time have still not been addressed and local government and local communities are suffering due to a highly centralized system of government.

The most important problem that the report highlights has not been addressed since 2013 is the complete absence of any legislative recognition of the principle of local self-government, as required by article two of the charter. The report recognizes that local authorities in this country enjoy no real legal protection against interference and control by the central power.

The lack of such integration of local self-government in our system is the reason why we can only speak of local government, rather than as the other 46 member states of the council speak of local self-government. The latter suggests far more autonomy and freedom from central control, interference and oversight than exists for our local government.

Funding overhaul

The report also points out that while some form of general jurisdiction exists, thanks to the first part of the Localism Act 2011, we still fall short of the charter because councils cannot regulate with certainty or predictability the share of local affairs for which they are responsible. because they don’t have the financial resources to do so, nor do they have the freedoms to significantly improve their own financial situation.

Our councils may have general legal jurisdiction but they do not have the actual power and capacity to act in the interest of their localities

General competence, in principle, is also strongly controlled and supervised by the center and does not give our local authorities the freedom to act as is the case in the other 46 member states of the Council of Europe.

Our councils, the report says, may have general legal jurisdiction, but they lack the actual power and capacity to act in the interests of their localities. One of the report’s most powerful recommendations concerns a major overhaul of the local government financing system. But we continue to tinker or resist fundamental change for fear of something worse.

A quick glance at the local authority taxing powers enjoyed by many Council of Europe members shows a much wider basket of powers than those available to our councils – raise your hand who has never paid a tourist tax abroad – but we are still far from obliging tourists from this country to contribute to the local services they consume.

Upgrade

The report highlights the centralized nature of governance in this country and the continued existence of central oversight, regulation, oversight and control of local affairs, and it suggests easing the burden of this monitoring and control.

Given the link between leveling up and decentralization, this recommendation is timely reading, but leveling up as currently configured also links decentralization to centrally set targets and objectives.

In order to avoid over-regulation and centralisation, the report recommends that the Charter of Local Self-Government should become a legally enforceable instrument so that local authorities can apply to the courts to guarantee the free exercise of their powers and responsibilities in order to strengthen their freedom central control – now that would be a radical step for decentralization in this country.

Overall the position of local government here, when opposed to the Charter of Local Self-Government, is not great and shows little or no sign of improvement, but it is worth pointing out. with equal force and clarity by an independent international body.

The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe has done local authorities in this country a great service with its evaluation and report.

It is now up to local government to use this report as a tool for change. The center often promises deconcentration, but offers decentralization – and this dichotomy is very clear in the leveling white paper.

The congress report provided a means of separating deconcentration from decentralization and offered a new basis from which greater freedom and autonomy can be sought for local government. Are we ready to fight?

Read the full report here

Colin Copus, Emeritus Professor of Local Politics, De Montfort University; visiting professor, Ghent University

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Sovereignty

Florida Governor DeSantis Pushes To End Disney Self-Government

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Governor Ron DeSantis on Tuesday asked the Legislature to repeal a law allowing Walt Disney World to run private government on its properties in the state, the latest volley of a feud between the governor and the entertainment giant over what critics have dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

DeSantis, an ascendant GOP governor and potential 2024 presidential candidate, has battled with Disney over the company’s opposition to the new law banning instruction about the sexual orientation and identity of gender from kindergarten to third grade.

On Tuesday, DeSantis upped the ante.

As lawmakers returned to the Capitol for a special legislative session on redistricting Congress, the governor issued a proclamation that allows the GOP-controlled statehouse to accept bills eliminating the autonomous district of Disney. Republicans quickly tabled proposals to this effect.

“I’m announcing today that we’re expanding the appeal of what they’re going to be considering this week. And so, yes, they’ll be looking at the map of Congress, but they’ll also be looking at terminating any special districts that have been enacted into law. in Florida before 1968, and that includes the Reedy Creek Improvement District,” DeSantis said at a press conference, referring to the company’s administrative district without mentioning Disney by name. not precised.

Disney representatives did not return an email request for comment on Tuesday. It was not immediately clear how eliminating the district would affect the company or neighboring governments.

The Reedy Creek Improvement District is a private government controlled by Disney World and created by the state legislature in 1967 to provide government services such as zoning, fire protection, utilities, and infrastructure.

The creation of the district and the control it gave Disney over 27,000 acres (11,000 hectares) in Florida was a crucial element in the company’s construction projects near Orlando in the 1960s. Officials of the company said they needed autonomy to plan a futuristic city with the theme park. The city never materialized, however; instead, it turned into an EPCOT theme park.

The push to punish the company comes after Disney announced it would suspend political donations in the state due to the new Parental Rights in Education Act. Opponents have dubbed the law “Don’t Say Gay”, arguing that banning classes on sexual orientation and gender identity in the early years would marginalize LGBTQ people.

Disney is one of Florida’s largest private employers: Last year, the company said it had more than 60,000 workers in the state. LGBTQ advocates who work for the company criticized CEO Bob Chapek for what they said was his slowness to speak out against the bill. Some left work in protest.

DeSantis has repeatedly lambasted Disney and critics of the law, attracting considerable attention in conservative media circles. He insists the policy is reasonable and says parents, not teachers, should bring up the topics of sexual orientation and gender identity with children.

Republican lawmakers seem receptive to punishing Disney, tabling proposals that would disband the district by June 2023. DeSantis has been a powerful governor, effectively pushing his priorities in the statehouse, and GOP Senate chairman and president of the House are supporting him on the Disney issue.

Democrats were quick to criticize the governor’s decision in retaliation for the company’s stance on the education bill. Some have pointed out that Disney has been a major economic driver in the state.

“What world are we living in right now? asked Democratic Senator Audrey Gibson. “It’s Florida’s state of freedom. If they don’t agree with the Governor, he pulls out the Gatling gun.

Richard Foglesong, a retired Rollins College political scientist whose book, ‘Married to the Mouse’ chronicles the formation of Reedy Creek, said he initially thought ‘cooler heads would prevail’ in the war of words between DeSantis and Disney.

“I think I was wrong. I overestimated — or underestimated — Governor DeSantis,” Foglesong said. “I see it as a legitimate threat.”

___

Associated Press writers Brendan Farrington in Tallahassee and Mike Schneider in Orlando contributed to this report.

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Home rule

Palm Beach leaders have a right to honor the importance of self-reliance

The city of Palm Beach is lucky to have Darrell Donatto in its corner. The Florida League of Cities seems to agree.

The city’s fire chief was recently honored by the organization as a “Home Rule Hero.” Donatto is chair of the Government Relations Committee of the Florida Fire Chiefs Association, which works hand-in-hand with the League of Cities on issues such as self-reliance, which gives local governments the right to local self-governance. .

The state continues to eat away at it, much to the chagrin of the league and local governments.

For example, in February the city petitioned the state for the right to regulate toxic pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides on the island, which the state preempted. Many local governments are also against a bill before Gov. Ron DeSantis that allows businesses whose revenue drops 15% or more as a result of a local ordinance or local citizens’ initiative to sue cities and towns. counties in damages.

State lawmakers have also halted local government decisions on things like plastic bag bans (which the city had to repeal under threat of a lawsuit in 2019), vacation rental regulations, and a host of other things that used to be decided at the local level.

“The most important powers available to a city in Florida are its self-governing powers,” the resolution states, noting that the legislature “has continued to unnecessarily erode the ability of municipalities to enact self-government, to the detriment of the ability of local residential communities to protect the health, safety and well-being of its residents, visitors, domestic animals and wildlife.”

It was not the first time the city had tried to maintain autonomy. The community led the state in implementing rules designed to protect residents during the early stages of COVID-19 — before DeSantis overridden local rules — and was the first in the county to implement a program vaccination against the virus.

Residents are lucky that Donatto, the Florida League of Cities, and the City Council are fighting to maintain autonomy. The all-volunteer City Council and its various councils are used to being well-managed, well-informed and well-supported by the city’s excellent staff and legal team, so constant interference from the State is particularly confusing.

Instead of the bickering and grandstanding that can be found at other levels of government, Palm Beach’s leaders looked after the people of the city first and foremost.

This is a lesson we would like others to learn.

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Home rule

Florida League of Cities honors 2 Fort Pierce officials with ‘Home Rule Hero’ awards

Fort Pierce-April 14, 2022: Two Fort Pierce officials have been honored with Florida League of Cities (FLC) “Home Rule Hero” awards.

Mayor Linda Hudson and Commissioner Curtis Johnson, Jr. were both recognized for their work and advocacy efforts during the 2022 legislative session. They both worked throughout the session to promote local voices making local choices, protect the Home Rule powers of Florida municipalities, and advance the League’s legislative agenda.

Autonomy is the ability of a city to solve local problems with local solutions with minimal state interference. Home Rule Hero Award recipients are local government officials, elected and unelected, who have always responded to the League’s request to contact members of the legislature and help provide a local perspective on an issue.

“On behalf of the League and its legislative team, we are very proud to present this year’s Home Rule Hero Awards to a deserving group of municipal leaders,” said FLC Director of Legislative Affairs Casey Cook. “We had a record number of Home Rule Heroes this year, which shows the dedication and impact of local authorities on behalf of their residents and businesses in protecting local decision-making. These local leaders have been consistently engaged and actively defended their communities throughout the 2022 legislative session. They are Home Rule heroes and we thank them for their efforts.

“It’s important to the City of Fort Pierce and Florida’s more than 400 municipalities that the Legislature recognize Home Rule, a concept found in Florida’s constitution that allows local governments to uniquely and effectively serve residents.” said Mayor Linda Hudson. “We work as a team during each legislative session to tell our story to our state legislators.”

“It is an honor to receive this award and this recognition for the service that I love to do,” Commissioner Johnson said. “As a Florida native, born and raised in Fort Pierce, I will always stand up for local authority because communities need to be able to govern and meet their respective community standards.”

The Florida League of Cities will officially recognize Mayor Hudson and Commissioner Johnson at a future event hosted by the Treasure Coast Regional League of Cities.

Founded in 1922, the Florida League of Cities is the united voice of Florida municipal governments. Its goals are to promote local self-reliance and meet the needs of Florida cities.

For more information, visit: https://flcities.com/.

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Home rule

Taking Home Rule seriously in Kansas – Pratt Tribune

By Russell Fox Professor of Political Science Wichita State University

Many Kansas Republicans probably burst out laughing in disbelief when Gov. Laura Kelly recently insisted she was “a major advocate for local control.” The image of Democrats favoring big government programs, with Republicans fighting to keep government small and local, runs deep. The state’s GOP language, presenting Kelly’s emergency ordinances during the pandemic as examples of “one size fits all” overreach, expertly uses this stereotype.

The truth, however, is more complicated. In Kansas, this complexity is further tangled in the urban/rural divide, with the localities that the Republican majority in Topeka often seems most interested in defending being the slowly emptying rural parts of Kansas, and attempts at self-governance in growing Kansas towns and cities seen as a threat. When Kansas Senator John Doll (R-Garden City) recently commented “I think we [in the legislature] it is enough to do so many things to curb the power of the municipal authorities”, his frustration was justified.

This session included two clear examples of this dynamic. First, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from acknowledging popular environmental concerns by banning or taxing plastic bags, which emerged primarily in response to activism by concerned citizens in Wichita. Second, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from addressing safety and health concerns by issuing municipal ID cards to undocumented workers, which emerged primarily in response to a carefully negotiated ordinance passed in Wyandotte County. The vote was close in both cases (though tighter in the first case than the second), thus potentially allowing Governor Kelly, contrary to the mainstream Republican narrative, to use his veto pen to defend localism.

Anyone who has spent time observing the patterns of Kansas politics through the framework of our population division, and how that plays out in shaping the electoral interests of legislators, cannot find all of this entirely surprising. Over the past decade and a half, there have been many similar conflicts, with most Republican lawmakers consistently rejecting the concerns and priorities expressed in the (very slow, but sure) liberalization of urban Kansas. There have been state laws that reversed the city’s efforts to keep their insurance costs low by preserving gun-free zones in city buildings, and state rulings that blocked the city’s efforts. to reduce or eliminate criminal penalties for the medical or recreational use of marijuana.

Federalism has always been, and always will be, a messy area of ​​American politics. Calls for “local control” have a mixed history on both sides of the political aisle and are often more self-serving than morally grounded. States with Democrat-dominated legislatures do not necessarily have a better record of upholding urban democracy. Still, given that Kansas has a literal “Home Rule” provision written into its state constitution, a little more deference and consistency would be nice. (For example, Lawrence passed an ordinance driven by concerns similar to Wyandotte’s with no reaction from the legislature, suggesting that state opposition to local governance is more a matter of political timing than legal interpretation. )

While there is no chance that Kansas will lose its reputation and historically rural character, the fact remains that the state’s economic development is primarily in the hands of the few urban parts of the state. where the population is growing. Local governments there need a free (or at least freer) hand to respond to the interests and beliefs of their citizens. Treating the efforts of urban Kansans in the name of public health, environmental stewardship, and civic life in the places where they live with dismissive inconsistency is no way to keep the Kansas sunflower blooming.

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Home rule

Work to Begin on Boston Bylaws Petition for an Elected School Committee

Work begins Thursday on a bylaws petition to codify last November’s term of office for an elected school board in Boston.

The business session would determine the details of the petition after more than 99,000 people — 79% of Boston voters, compared to 64% who elected Mayor Michelle Wu — said they wanted to replace Boston’s appointed school board with an elected one.

“I believe this moment requires democracy,” said General Councilor Julia Mejia, who plans to attend the working session with other councilors, as well as a handful of advocates for a fully elected school board. “If you are able to elect a school committee, you are able to hold it accountable.”

The task force will likely have two to three sessions before sending the final version of the bylaws petition to the city council for a vote, Mejia said.

If the council approves, the petition will then go to the state legislature for a vote, and if it passes there, it will head to Governor Charlie Baker to sign it if he agrees with it.
Boston is the only one of Massachusetts’ 351 municipalities that does not have an elected school board.

“Why should Boston be the only municipality where voters can’t be trusted to choose their own decision makers on the school board?” said Lisa Green of Bostonians for an elected school committee, which will participate in Thursday’s business session.

Boston is the only one of Massachusetts’ 351 municipalities that does not have an elected school board.

A city spokesperson didn’t say whether Wu planned to attend the business sessions or send a representative, saying only, “The mayor looks forward to reviewing the proposal she receives from the council.” .

Wu said she favors a hybrid model in which some committee members are appointed by her, as it “allows accountability from the mayor.” But a spokesperson did not say whether his appointees would act as proxies or be independent once appointed.

“It’s interesting that the mayor opposes receivership (a state takeover of Boston’s public schools), but wants at least a hybrid when it comes to the school board,” Green said.

“It’s always the same thing: removing local control. Should we ask the mayor to appoint the city council? We couldn’t stand that.

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Home rule

Taking Home Rule Seriously in Kansas

By Russell Fox Professor of Political Science Wichita State University

Many Kansas Republicans probably burst out laughing in disbelief when Gov. Laura Kelly recently insisted she was “a major advocate for local control.” The image of Democrats as favoring big government programs, with Republicans fighting to keep government small and local, is deeply ingrained. The state’s GOP language, presenting Kelly’s emergency ordinances during the pandemic as examples of “one size fits all” overreach, expertly uses this stereotype.

The truth, however, is more complicated. In Kansas, this complexity is further tangled in the urban/rural divide, with the localities that the Republican majority in Topeka often seems most interested in defending being the slowly emptying rural parts of Kansas, and attempts at self-governance in growing Kansas towns and cities seen as a threat. When Kansas Senator John Doll (R-Garden City) recently commented “I think we [in the legislature] it is enough to do so many things to curb the power of the municipal authorities”, his frustration was justified.

This session included two clear examples of this dynamic. First, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from acknowledging popular environmental concerns by banning or taxing plastic bags, which emerged primarily in response to activism by concerned citizens in Wichita. Second, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from addressing safety and health concerns by issuing municipal ID cards to undocumented workers, which emerged primarily in response to a carefully negotiated ordinance passed in Wyandotte County. The vote was close in both cases (though tighter in the first case than the second), thus potentially allowing Governor Kelly, contrary to the mainstream Republican narrative, to use his veto pen to defend localism.

Anyone who has spent time observing the patterns of Kansas politics through the framework of our population division, and how that plays out in shaping the electoral interests of legislators, cannot find all of this entirely surprising. Over the past decade and a half, there have been many similar conflicts, with most Republican lawmakers consistently rejecting the concerns and priorities expressed in the (very slow, but sure) liberalization of urban Kansas. There have been state laws that reversed the city’s efforts to keep their insurance costs low by preserving gun-free zones in city buildings, and state rulings that blocked the city’s efforts. to reduce or eliminate criminal penalties for the medical or recreational use of marijuana.

Federalism has always been, and always will be, a messy area of ​​American politics. Calls for “local control” have a mixed history on both sides of the political aisle and are often more self-serving than morally grounded. States with Democrat-dominated legislatures do not necessarily have a better record of upholding urban democracy. Still, given that Kansas has a literal “Home Rule” provision written into its state constitution, a little more deference and consistency would be nice. (For example, Lawrence passed an ordinance driven by concerns similar to Wyandotte’s with no reaction from the legislature, suggesting that state opposition to local governance is more a matter of political timing than legal interpretation. )

While there is no chance that Kansas will lose its reputation and historically rural character, the fact remains that the state’s economic development is primarily in the hands of the few urban parts of the state. where the population is growing. Local governments there need a free (or at least freer) hand to respond to the interests and beliefs of their citizens. Treating the efforts of urban Kansans in the name of public health, environmental stewardship, and civic life in the places where they live with dismissive inconsistency is no way to keep the Kansas sunflower blooming.

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Home rule

City Manager Lori LaVerriere Receives 2022 Home Rule Hero Award Boca Raton’s Most Trusted Source

Lori LaVerriere

City manager recognized for advocacy efforts in 2022 legislative session

Boca Raton, Fla. – The Florida League of Cities (FLC), celebrating its 100th anniversary as the united voice of Florida municipal governments, recently honored City Manager Lori LaVerriere with a 2022 Home Rule Hero Award for her hard work and leadership. advocacy efforts during the 2022 Legislative Session. She worked tirelessly throughout the session to promote local voices making local choices, protect the Home Rule powers of Florida municipalities, and advance the League’s legislative agenda.

“On behalf of the League and its legislative team, we are very proud to present this year’s Home Rule Hero Awards to a deserving group of municipal leaders,” said FLC Director of Legislative Affairs Casey Cook. “We had a record number of Home Rule Heroes this year, which shows the dedication and impact of local authorities on behalf of their residents and businesses in protecting local decision-making. These local leaders have been consistently engaged and actively defended their communities throughout the 2022 legislative session. They are Home Rule heroes and we thank them for their efforts.

Autonomy is the ability of a city to solve local problems with local solutions with minimal state interference. Home Rule Hero Award recipients are local government officials, elected and unelected, who have always responded to the League’s request to contact members of the legislature and help provide a local perspective on an issue.

Lori LaVerriere has served the public sector for over 35 years, working for several municipalities in Palm Beach County. Currently City Manager of Boynton Beach, LaVerriere manages 15 departments and an annual budget of $251 million. She leads a team of 800 employees who serve a population of over 80,000. LaVerriere served as Deputy City Manager before becoming City Manager in December 2012. She has held the title of ICMA Accredited City Manager for 14 years. She is an active member of the International County/City Management Association (ICMA) and is the president-elect of the Florida City and County Management Association (FCCMA). Lori has also served on the board of directors for the Palm Beach County City Management Association (PBCCMA). She holds a BA from Florida International University and an MBA from Palm Beach Atlantic University. She is also a graduate of the Palm Beach County Leadership Class of 2020.

“It is a privilege to work with the mayor and the municipal commissioners to defend the principle of autonomy. Boynton Beach’s ability to engage directly with residents and businesses and set our own rules and ordinances is a critical component in helping meet the unique needs of our community,” LaVerriere said. “It is truly an honor to be the recipient of the 2022 Home Rule Hero Award.”

Founded in 1922, the Florida League of Cities is the united voice of Florida municipal governments. Its goals are to promote local self-reliance and meet the needs of Florida cities, which are formed and governed by their citizens. The League believes in “Local Voices Making Local Choices,” which focuses on the impact of citizens and municipal leaders on improving Florida communities. For more information, visit flcities.com.

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Home rule

Three DeLand officials honored with 2022 Home Rule Hero Award

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF DELAND

Commissioner Chris Cloudman, Mayor Bob Apgar and Deputy City Manager Mike Grebosz recognized for their advocacy efforts during the 2022 legislative session

The Florida League of Cities (FLC), which is celebrating its 100th anniversary as the united voice of Florida municipal governments, recently honored three city officials – Commissioner Chris Cloudman, Deputy City Manager Mike Grebosz and Mayor Bob Apgar – with a 2022 Home Rule Hero Award for their hard work and advocacy efforts during the 2022 legislative session. All three worked tirelessly throughout the session to promote local voices making local choices, protect the powers of the Home Rule of Florida Municipalities and advancing the League’s legislative agenda.

“On behalf of the League and its legislative team, we are very proud to present this year’s Home Rule Hero Awards to a deserving group of municipal leaders,” said FLC Director of Legislative Affairs Casey Cook. “We had a record number of Home Rule Heroes this year, which shows the dedication and impact of local authorities on behalf of their residents and businesses in protecting local decision-making. These local leaders have been consistently engaged and actively defended their communities throughout the 2022 legislative session. They are Home Rule heroes and we thank them for their efforts.

This is the first time that DeLand has 3 recipients in the same year.

Autonomy is the ability of a city to solve local problems with local solutions with minimal state interference. Home Rule Hero Award recipients are local government officials, elected and unelected, who have always responded to the League’s request to contact members of the legislature and help provide a local perspective on an issue.

“I’m proud of the work our city has done to protect not only our residents, but municipalities across the state,” said Mayor Bob Apgar. “For some time now, state legislators have eroded the rights of local governments to self-govern when they should be collectively focused on addressing issues affecting our entire state, such as runaway rents, funding for affordable housing or rising seas.

“I want to congratulate Commissioner Chris Cloudman and Deputy City Manager Mike Grebosz for receiving this award 2 years in a row. As I step down later this year, I am happy to know that there are others who will continue to defend our city and I encourage all of our future commissioners to be active advocates for DeLand at the community level. ‘State.

Commissioner Chris Cloudman was born in Boynton Beach and raised in Port Orange. He moved to DeLand in 2008 and was appointed to Seat 4 of the City Commission in 2014 and has served ever since.

Deputy City Manager Mike Grebosz, a city resident and graduate of Stetson University, has worked for the city for 17 years, the last six years as Deputy City Manager.

Mayor Apgar has won the Home Rule Hero Award multiple times since its inception in 2009. He has been very active in the Volusia League of Cities, Florida League of Mayors, and Florida League of Cities in various capacities during his tenure as mayor .

— Chris Graham, DeLand Community Information Manager

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Independence activist

Taiwan mourns independence activist Peng Ming-min – News





Taiwan mourns independence activist Peng Ming-min – News – RTI Radio Taiwan International













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  • April 11, 2022

  • Leslie Liao
Taiwanese independence activist Peng Ming-min dies at 98

Taiwan mourns the death of a key figure in the country’s democratic transition and its independence movement.

Longtime Taiwanese independence advocate Peng Ming-min died last week at the age of 98. Peng’s foundation announced his death last Friday, but did not state a cause. Peng ran as the Democratic Progressive Party candidate in Taiwan’s first direct presidential election in 1996. In 2000, President Chen Shui-bian hired him as a senior adviser to the president.

Peng was born in 1923. He studied in Canada and France. In 1942, he lost his left arm during an American aerial bombardment while he was in Japan. Authorities arrested Peng in 1964 for sedition after he published a manifesto advocating Taiwan independence. In 1970, Peng fled to Sweden and then to the United States where he became a teacher. There he established the Formosa Association for Public Affairs, or FAPA. He returned to Taiwan in 1992 after then-president Lee Teng-hui reformed Taiwan’s penal code, granting amnesty to Peng.

Premier Su Tseng-chang said Peng loves Taiwan and has devoted his whole life to the country. Su says he thinks Taiwanese will remember Peng as a fighter. He says Peng’s followers will carry on his legacy.

On its website, Peng’s foundation states that his last words were “Taiwan and China are separated.” It is an absolute truth. Peng’s will states that he does not wish a burial. He will be cremated and buried in a church in the city of Kaohsiung.

Peng had a rich life where he witnessed many major events in Taiwan’s history. His experience and his influence make him a unique actor. Although Peng is gone, his legacy is sure to live on.

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Home rule

Taking home rule seriously in Kansas – Leavenworth Times

Many Kansas Republicans probably giggled in disbelief when Gov. Laura Kelly recently insisted she was “a major advocate for local control.” The image of Democrats as favoring big government programs, with Republicans fighting to keep government small and local, is deeply ingrained. The state’s GOP language, presenting Kelly’s emergency ordinances during the pandemic as examples of “one size fits all” overreach, expertly uses this stereotype.

The truth, however, is more complicated. In Kansas, this complexity is further tangled in the urban/rural divide, with the localities that the Republican majority in Topeka often seems most interested in defending being rural Kansas localities that are slowly emptying out, and with attempts at self-governance. in growing Kansas. towns and cities considered a threat. When Kansas Sen. John Doll (R-Garden City) recently commented, “I think we (in the Legislature) do so much to limit the power of the municipality,” his frustration was justified.

This session included two clear examples of this dynamic. First, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from acknowledging popular environmental concerns by banning or taxing plastic bags, which emerged primarily in response to activism by concerned citizens in Wichita. Second, a bill to prevent Kansas cities and counties from addressing safety and health concerns by issuing municipal ID cards to undocumented workers, which emerged primarily in response to a carefully negotiated ordinance passed in Wyandotte County. The vote was close in both cases (though tighter in the first case than in the second), thus potentially allowing Kelly, contrary to the mainstream Republican narrative, to use his veto pen to defend localism. Anyone who has spent time watching

Anyone who has spent time observing the patterns of Kansas politics through the framework of our population division, and how that plays out in shaping the electoral interests of legislators, cannot find all of this entirely surprising. Over the past decade and a half, there have been many similar conflicts, with most Republican lawmakers consistently rejecting the concerns and priorities expressed in the (very slow, but sure) liberalization of urban Kansas. There have been state laws that reversed the city’s efforts to keep their insurance costs low by preserving gun-free zones in city buildings, and state rulings that blocked the city’s efforts. to reduce or eliminate criminal penalties for the medical or recreational use of marijuana.

Federalism has always been, and always will be, a messy area of ​​American politics. Calls for “local control” have a mixed history on both sides of the political aisle and are often more self-serving than morally grounded. States with Democrat-dominated legislatures do not necessarily have a better record of upholding urban democracy. Still, given that Kansas has a literal “home rule” provision written into its state constitution, a little more deference and consistency would be nice. (For example, Lawrence passed an ordinance driven by concerns similar to Wyandotte’s with no reaction from the legislature, suggesting that state opposition to local governance is more a matter of political timing than legal interpretation. )

While there is no chance that Kansas will lose its reputation and historically rural character, the fact remains that the state’s economic development is primarily in the hands of the few urban parts of the state. where the population is growing. Local governments there need a free (or at least freer) hand to respond to the interests and beliefs of their citizens. Treating the efforts of urban Kansans in the name of public health, environmental stewardship, and civic life in the places where they live with dismissive inconsistency is no way to keep the Kansas sunflower blooming.

Russell Arben Fox teaches politics in Wichita.

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Sovereignty

Expectation of self-government attracts more citizens to the Métis Nation of Ontario

By Shari Narine

Journalism Initiative local reporter,

Margaret Froh Métis Nation President of Ontario

It’s a “very exciting time” to be Métis in Canada and Ontario, says Margaret Froh, president of the Métis Nation of Ontario.

With Métis self-government on the horizon, the number of Métis in Ontario registering their citizenship with the MNO is increasing, she says.

People “want to be a part of Métis history, as well as access to the variety of services we offer that will only grow and expand as we move forward, especially under self-government,” said said Froh in an exclusive interview with Windspeaker. com.

In 2019, the MNO signed a Métis Government Recognition and Self-Government Agreement with Canada. It outlines the steps to be taken for the federal government to recognize the inherent self-government rights held by the Métis communities represented by the MNO and authorize the MNO to implement those rights on behalf of these communities.

Similar agreements have been signed by the federal government with the Métis nations of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

In 2017, the MNO and the Ontario government announced that there were seven “historic Métis communities in the province that meet the Powley test criteria”. Powley is the name of the defendants in a landmark Supreme Court of Canada decision on Métis hunting rights. The court established a set of criteria that the Metis must meet in order to have these hunting rights.

“We represent Métis who are historically connected to historic Métis communities in Ontario, such as the Powley community (in Sault Ste. Marie) and we also represent Métis who are connected to the Métis Nation homeland west of Ontario,” said Froh.

MNO’s most recent registry numbers sit at around 28,000 citizens.

“The new Métis government will have recognized law-making powers in the areas of citizenship, leadership selection and internal operations. The Self-Government Agreement has “locked in” these steps so that they cannot be swept away by changing winds or political circumstances. In this way, the Self-Government Agreement ‘sets the table’ for the next steps the MNO will take to implement the agreement,” reads the MNO’s website.

The progress of meetings needed to take those next steps has been affected by the coronavirus, Froh says, noting that public gatherings were banned in early 2020 as a way to combat COVID-19. It was therefore difficult, but not impossible, to reach regional and local leaders.

“One of the most important things we have to do is we have to build our constitution through dialogue with citizens across the province working from the bottom up,” Froh said.

The constitution will address issues such as who the Métis are, the governance structure, how to elect leaders, and how to resolve disputes.

Now that most COVID restrictions have been recalled or lifted, Froh said they will move forward with a “deep level of engagement” to hear from people around what they want to see in terms of our Métis government 30, 50, 70 years into the future. It’s a really exciting process. It’s really engaging people.

She adds that the interest comes from both young people and elders.

While this larger work is underway, the MNO is also working on policy. Two of his new policies ensure that MNO resources, programs, services and appointments go where they are supposed to go.

“Our concern is that when we negotiate benefits on behalf of Métis rights holders, they go to Métis rights holders and we deal with that,” Froh said.

The Eligibility Policy for Direct Benefits Programs and Services now requires full MNO citizenship record status to be eligible.

These programs and services include early learning and child care programs, post-secondary education, MNO COVID relief programs, home improvement, and housing stabilization.

The MNO is also tackling the issue of people claiming to be Métis and receiving post-secondary appointments. These false claims have come to the fore over the past year.

The MNO has adopted a policy of verifying the status of the MNO’s citizenship file with other governments and third-party institutions. It provides a mechanism for a government or third-party institution (such as a university) to verify the citizenship record status of an MNO citizen applying to receive an award, benefit or recognition, where proof that an individual is a Métis rights holder is a factor in the decision.

Froh says such a check only works if a Metis from Ontario is on the MNO’s registration list. However, not being on this list does not mean that someone is not Métis.

“In this case, it is a little more difficult for you to be able to demonstrate to any institution,” she pointed out.

The Congress of Aboriginal Peoples also represents Métis, as well as off-reserve status and non-status First Nations, and southern Inuit.

Shari Narine is a Local Journalism Initiative reporter who works at Windspeaker.Com. The Local Journalism Initiative is funded by the Government of Canada.

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Independence activist

Veteran Taiwan Independence Activist Peng Ming-min Dies at 98 | Taiwan News

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Peng Ming-min (彭明敏), a veteran pro-democracy and pro-independence activist from Taiwan, died on Friday (April 8) in Taipei.


Peng was one of the most influential figures in the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). In 2000, he served as National Political Advisor to former President Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁).


Born in Taichung during Japanese rule (1895-1945), Peng studied law and political science at what was then Tokyo Imperial University, later renamed Tokyo University. Peng returned to Taiwan to continue his studies at National Taiwan University and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1948, when there was a political crackdown on intellectuals after the Kuomintang (KMT) lost the civil war. for the benefit of the Chinese Communist Party and moved to Taiwan.


After graduating, Peng worked briefly in a bank, then earned a master’s degree in law from McGill University in Canada and a doctorate in international law from the University of Paris in 1954. After returning to Taiwan to teach at National Taiwan University, Peng was already an internationally renowned international law expert.


Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek later appointed Peng as an advisor to the Taiwanese delegation to the United Nations in 1961, the highest political post held by an ethnic Taiwanese at the time.


However, Peng became skeptical of the political system after three years of service, so he jointly authored “A Manifesto to Save Taiwan,” which advocated rewriting the outdated constitution to reflect political reality, protect human rights, man and create responsible government, as well as joining the UN with a new identity – as Taiwan rather than “China”.


The attempt to update the constitution failed and Peng was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Peng managed to escape to Sweden and then to the United States in 1970.


He held leadership positions in several pro-democracy and pro-independence organizations during his 22 years in the United States, during which he co-founded the Formosan Association for Public Affairs (FAPA) in 1982. This is become one of the most influential organizations in Washington. pro-Taiwan based lobby groups.


Peng returned to Taiwan in 1992 at the invitation of President Lee Teng-hui (李登輝). He joined the DPP in 1995 and ran against Lee in the country’s first direct presidential election on behalf of the DPP.


The Peng Foundation for Culture and Education (彭明敏文教基金會) announced Peng’s loss on Friday morning (April 8), adding that the veteran pro-independence activist will be laid to rest in a cemetery at the Presbyterian Church in Yancheng District. , Kaohsiung.

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Self government

Pending self-government draws more citizens to Métis Nation of Ontario

It’s a “very exciting time” to be Métis in Canada and Ontario, says Margaret Froh, president of the Métis Nation of Ontario.

With Métis self-government on the horizon, the number of Métis in Ontario registering their citizenship with the MNO is increasing, she says.

People “want to be a part of Métis history, as well as access to the variety of services we offer that will only grow and expand as we move forward, especially under self-government,” said Froh in an exclusive interview with Windspeaker. com.

In 2019, the MNO signed a Métis Government Recognition and Self-Government Agreement with Canada. It outlines the steps to be taken for the federal government to recognize the inherent self-government rights held by the Métis communities represented by the MNO and authorize the MNO to implement those rights on behalf of these communities.

Similar agreements have been signed by the federal government with the Métis nations of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

In 2017, the MNO and the Ontario government announced that there were seven “historic Métis communities in the province that met the Powley test criteria”. Powley is the name of the defendants in a landmark Supreme Court of Canada decision on Métis hunting rights. The court established a set of criteria that the Metis must meet in order to have these hunting rights.

“We represent Métis who are historically connected to historic Métis communities in Ontario, such as the Powley community (in Sault Ste. Marie) and we also represent Métis who are connected to the Métis Nation homeland west of Ontario,” said Froh.

MNO’s most recent registry numbers sit at around 28,000 citizens.

“The new Métis government will have recognized law-making powers in the areas of citizenship, leadership selection and internal operations. The Self-Government Agreement has “locked in” these steps so that they cannot be swept away by changing winds or political circumstances. In this way, the Self-Government Agreement “sets the table” for the next steps the ORM will take to implement the agreement,” reads the ORM’s website.

The progress of meetings needed to take those next steps has been affected by the coronavirus, Froh says, noting that public gatherings were banned in early 2020 as a way to combat COVID-19. It was therefore difficult, but not impossible, to reach regional and local leaders.

“One of the most important things we have to do is build our constitution…through dialogue with citizens across the province working from scratch,” Froh said.

The constitution will address issues such as who the Métis are, the governance structure, how to elect leaders, and how to resolve disputes.

Now that most COVID restrictions have been recalled or lifted, Froh said they will move forward with a “deep level of engagement…in order to hear from people around what they want to see in terms of our Métis government 30, 50, 70 years into the future. It’s a really exciting process. It’s really engaging people.

She adds that the interest comes from both young people and elders.

While this larger work is underway, the MNO is also working on policy. Two of his new policies ensure that MNO resources, programs, services and appointments go where they are supposed to go.

“Our concern is that when we negotiate benefits on behalf of Métis rights holders, they go to Métis rights holders and we deal with that,” Froh said.

The Eligibility Policy for Direct Benefits Programs and Services now requires full MNO citizenship record status to be eligible. These programs and services include Early Learning and Child Care Programs, Post-Secondary Education, MNO COVID Relief Programs, Home Improvement and Housing Stabilization.

The MNO is also tackling the issue of people claiming to be Métis and receiving post-secondary appointments. These false claims have come to the fore over the past year.

The MNO has adopted a policy of verifying the status of the MNO’s citizenship file with other governments and third-party institutions. It provides a mechanism for a government or third-party institution (such as a university) to verify the citizenship record status of an MNO citizen applying to receive an award, benefit or recognition, where proof that an individual is a Métis rights holder is a factor in the decision.

Froh says such a check only works if a Metis from Ontario is on the MNO’s registration list. However, not being on this list does not mean that someone is not Métis.

“In this case, it is a little more difficult for you to be able to demonstrate to any institution,” she pointed out.

The Congress of Aboriginal Peoples also represents Métis, as well as off-reserve status and non-status First Nations, and southern Inuit.

Windspeaker.com

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Self government

Canada and the Anishinabek Nation sign historic self-government agreement

The federal government has signed a historic self-government agreement with the Anishinabek Nation.

The Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement is the first self-government agreement of its kind in Ontario and focuses on recognizing the inherent right of First Nations to self-determination as they transition to self-government.

Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, joined Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Reg Niganobe and several First Nations Chiefs, including Nipissing First Nation Chief Scott McLeod, at a virtual ceremony on Wednesday.

“Congratulations to the First Nations who signed the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement today and I salute all the hard work, dedication and perseverance of those involved in achieving this historic moment,” said Niganobe. “The Governance Accord is another instrument we have to implement Anishinaabe inherent jurisdictions and laws in fundamental areas that are the pillars of our First Nations governments: citizenship, language and culture, and how we select our leaders and are accountable to their citizens.

The agreement was reached after more than 20 years of negotiations and recognizes Anishinabek control over governance and legislative powers in key areas, including the conduct of elections, the functioning of their governments, as well as language protection. and Anishinaabe culture.

“As our nations strive to reclaim our rightful jurisdiction over our own governance, the Anishinabek Nation Governance Accord provides us with a tool to opt out of sections of the Indian Act, allowing us to govern and protect our elections, our language and culture, our citizenship, and management and operations,” says McLeod. “This is a positive step towards self-government.”

Once in effect, the parts of the Indian Act that deal with governance will no longer apply to signatory Anishinabek First Nations.

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Sovereignty

Canada and Anishinabek First Nations sign historic self-government agreement

OTTAWA (ON), April 6, 2022 /CNW/ – Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada and the Anishinabek Nation

The government of Canada works with First Nations partners to restore respectful nation-to-nation relationships, recognize their inherent right to self-determination, and support communities as they emerge from the grip Indian Act and the transition to self-government.

Today, the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, joined the Chief of the Grand Council of the Anishinabek Nation Reg NiganobeChief Lloyd Myke of Magnetawan First Nation, Gimaa Kwe Rhonda Williams-Lovett of Moose Deer Point First Nation, Chief Scott McLeod of the Nipissing First Nation, Chief larry roque of the Wahnapitae First Nation and Chief Irene Kels of the Zhiibaahaasing First Nation in a virtual ceremony to celebrate the signing of the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement.

the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement is the first self-government agreement of its kind in Ontario and marks an important step away from the Indian Act for the signatory Anishinabek First Nations.

Obtained after more than 20 years of negotiations, this historic agreement will recognize Anishinabek control over the governance and law-making powers of signatory First Nations in key areas. First Nations will make their own decisions about how their elections will be held, who their citizens are and how their governments will operate, and how best to protect and promote Anishinaabe language and culture. Once in force, the parts of the Indian Act that deal with governance will no longer apply to signatory Anishinabek First Nations.

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“Congratulations to the Anishinabek leadership and all those who worked so long at the negotiating table and through community outreach to bring this historic Agreement to life. This Agreement will help revitalize traditional Anishinaabe governance and renew our nation-to-nation relationship with the signatory. Anishinabek First Nations. We look forward to continuing to work with our Anishinabek partners on all of our shared priorities, implementing their inherent right to self-determination, and supporting their inspiring visions of a better future for their citizens.

The Honorable Marc Miller
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“Congratulations to the First Nations who signed the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement today and salute the hard work, dedication and perseverance of those involved in reaching this historic moment. The Governance Agreement is another instrument we have to implement Anishinaabe inherent jurisdictions and laws in fundamental areas that are the pillars of our First Nations governments: citizenship, language and culture, and how we select our leaders and are accountable to their citizens. The new government-to-government fiscal transfer removes these First Nations from these particular limitations of the Indian Act and helps these First Nations determine their respective priorities.

Head of the Grand Council Reg Niganobe
Anishinabek Nation

“Anishinaabe governance is the legacy that E’dbendaagzijig will leave today for future generations: the ability to govern ourselves and determine what is best for our community. This will be achieved through a community-based law-making process — relevant and unique to Moose deer tip.”

Gimaa Kwe Rhonda Williams-Lovett
Moose Deer Point First Nation

“For the Wahnapitae First Nation, the signing of this agreement is another milestone on a very long journey, a journey our members have traveled since the Creator placed the Anishinaabe on Mother Earth. With the momentum of one step, we take the next, and we do so with the knowledge and wisdom of our people who carry us all forward. Today, we are very happy to continue this journey as we seek to exercise our inherent right of self-government.

Chief larry roque
Wahnapitae First Nation

“As our nations strive to reclaim our rightful jurisdictions over our own governance, the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement provides us with a tool to opt out of sections of the Indian Act, enabling us to govern and protect our elections, language and culture, citizenship, management and operations. This is a positive step towards autonomy. »

Chief Scott McLeod
Nipissing First Nation

“Magnetawan Anishinabek governance is the next step in exercising our inherent right to govern ourselves and position our community and members in creating our supreme laws.”

Chief Lloyd Myke
Magnetawan First Nation

“This deal is one for our history books. It will help us build new relationships within our community. We need to keep the Anishinaabemowin alive so we can connect with our environment and be proud of who we are.

Chief Irene Kels
Zhiibaahaasing First Nation

Fast facts

  • Self-government negotiations with the Anishinabek Nation on governance began in 1995, resulted in an agreement-in-principle in 2007 and concluded in 2019.

  • Over the past two years, the Agreement has been approved by the citizens of each signatory First Nation through a community vote.

  • This follows extensive community outreach during this period as well as engagement with Anishinabek citizens during negotiations.

  • Now that the Accord is signed, the next step is federal legislation to put the Accord into effect.

  • Signatory First Nations (which make up the Anishinabek Nation government) will also be required to pass their own Anishinabek laws to create and manage their new system of governance.

  • This work will be supported by increased funding to First Nations to fulfill their new responsibilities and invest in community priorities for a better future.

  • This is not the first self-government agreement negotiated with the Anishinabek Nation. In 2018, the parties reached an Education Self-Government Agreement which is now in effect for 23 Anishinabek First Nations in Ontario.

Related links

Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement

Anishinabek Nation

Self-government

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SOURCE Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

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View original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/April2022/06/c6167.html

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Self government

Normani on his new era of ‘self-government’ and the vulnerable song ‘Fair’ (exclusive)

Normani on his new era of ‘self-government’ and the vulnerable song ‘Fair’ (exclusive)

Norman enters a new era. ET’s Denny Directo spoke to the 25-year-old singer about her latest track, “Fair,” and her decision to release music that reflects her, even if it’s not what fans expect.

“With ‘Fair’, I feel like it was really the perfect record to be vulnerable, to share my innermost thoughts and feelings and what grief feels like to me,” she said. to ET. “I’m always introducing myself. Yes, everyone knows I can dance and I can be this confident, diva performer, but there’s so much more.”

Although Normani was very attached to the song’s release, being so vulnerable was still “absolutely terrifying” to her.

“I always say it’s such a cheeky move, because I know what people want from me and I know what my fans want, but at some point it’s like, where do I put me in there?” she asked. “I know what it’s like to put out records that I don’t necessarily believe in and do things that are expected of me, but I have to put out records that really reflect the growth of the last three years that I’ve grown. I’ve had.”

Manufacturing the music video because the track was equally nerve-wracking and rewarding for the singer.

“I feel like it was therapeutic in a way. Just filming the visual was definitely triggering. It was the first time I felt like I could really tap into my acting abilities, which I’m really proud of,” she said. “I think obviously there was a little nervousness because I really have to emotionally go there and go back to where the song was written from, which was incredibly triggering and difficult.”

Normani added that “in the end, after all the tears and screams…it was really awesome. I feel like it’s one of my best. I’m proud of it.”

The success of the song and the fan response it generated made Normani more confident in her abilities.

“[I’ve learned] trust me more. Trusting my abilities and knowing that God has given me all the tools I need,” she said. “I don’t need to search for anything. I have everything I need to step into the destiny he is creating and the path he has given me, so I just need to do this.”

As she enters this period of “self-government”, Normani does not leave her fans behind, as she remains extremely grateful for their support.

“For someone who always felt very neglected and was the only black girl in a group, mentally that was a lot for me. There were times when I felt unseen and unimportant, and my vocal ability wasn’t as amazing,” she said. “To come out of it, I feel my resilience, but also the people who have been riding with me since day one. I’m so grateful for that.”

With that in mind, Normani promises her fans that the songs they’ve been waiting for are “all coming this summer.”

“It will definitely be worth the wait. Hope you like it as much as I do,” she said of her upcoming album. “I obviously spent a few years on it…I just hope they feel closer to me, honestly. That’s the beauty of music. People can interpret it any way they want, but once that it’s theirs, I hope they enjoy it.”

As they eagerly await the new music, fans can check out Normani’s version of “Take me to the ball game‘, which she recorded as part of her partnership with Cracker Jack, in the midst of their Cracker Jill campaign.

“I wanted to keep it as close to the original as possible while adding my vocal textures and leads to Normani-fy a bit,” she said of the beloved track. “It didn’t take much because it’s so classic. I didn’t want to lose the integrity of what the record was. That’s the beauty of it. It was fun, though. C was fun shooting the clip.”

As for the campaign itself, Normani is honored to be a part of it, as it celebrates the groundbreaking achievements of female athletes.

“She comes out of it with a vengeance and with full force,” Normani told ET of Cracker Jill. “It was a long time coming and I feel very late. But here we are and I’m truly honored to have been asked to be a part of such a monumental moment for the brand.”

“I was really inspired by a lot of women at a young age, whether it was in music, whether it was sports, whether it was fashion or modeling,” she added. “To me, that representation is so essential, and it’s not every day that you associate yourself with a brand that aligns with your vision and what you sincerely believe in.”

Normani gives soulful performance of new single on ‘The Tonight Show’

Normani releases vulnerable new track “Fair”

Normani Teases New Album And When Fans Can Expect It (Exclusive)

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Home rule

Chandler accepts arguments for Proposition 470, home rule option

City of Chandler officials are now accepting arguments for or against Proposition 470, which would give Chandler leaders financial control over budgeting instead of following a state formula. Proposition 470 would not raise taxes, according to city council members at a March 21 town meeting.

A primary election will be held on August 2 to elect a mayor, elect three city council members and approve or reject Proposition 470.. Arguments regarding Proposition 470, also known as the rule of origin option, must be filed by 5 p.m. on March 4. Submissions are limited to 300 words, according to a press release, and the cost to file an argument is $150. Payments can be made by personal check payable to the City of Chandler, credit or debit card, cash or money order.

Arguments may be submitted in person at Chandler City Hall, City Clerk’s Office, 175 S. Arizona Ave., First Floor, Chandler, or by mail at Chandler City Hall, Mail Stop 606, PO Box 4008, Chandler, AZ 85244-4008 . Each argument must be submitted electronically to the City Clerk’s Office at [email protected]according to the press release.

According to a presentation given at a March 21 city council study session, the City of Chandler is $215.82 million over budget that would have been allocated by the state. If Proposition 470 were denied, the city would have to make major adjustments to its spending practices to accommodate the state’s formula, which was created more than 40 years ago.

Some of these adjustments could potentially include cuts to street maintenance funding, the deferral or cancellation of capital projects, and cuts to public safety funding. Proposition 470, which would last four years once confirmed, has been approved 10 consecutive times since 1982.

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Self government

Manitoba Metis Federation Takes Another Step Towards Self-Government

By Chelsea Kemp

Journalist of the Local Journalism Initiative

The Manitoba Metis Federation fine-tuned the verbiage of its constitution at its annual general meeting over the weekend, strengthening its ability to serve in the Red River Metis national government.

The Annual General Meeting was held from Friday to Sunday and presented 23 resolutions to amend the MMF constitution, election regulations

Leah LaPlante, Vice-President of the Southwest Region of the Manitoba Métis Federation

The MMF is in negotiations with the federal government to establish a treaty process and establish the rules around being a government for the Red River Métis. An agreement between the parties was reached on July 6, 2021, when the Manitoba Métis Recognition and Implementation Agreement was signed. Together, they are working to advance the document and the government-to-government relationship based on the affirmation of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership with the Red River Métis.

The document was jointly developed by all parties and marks a historic agreement that will support MMF’s vision of self-determination and self-government, said Leah LaPlante, MMF Southwest Region Vice President.

The agreement recognizes the right of the Manitoba Métis to self-government and the mandate of the MMF to serve as the government of the Manitoba Métis. This includes recognition of the MMF’s jurisdiction over citizenship, leadership selection, elections and operations relating to Red River Métis citizens.

The constitutional amendments in the MMF assembly are a vital part of history, LaPlante said, and mark the fulfillment of generations of hard work on behalf of the Métis people.

Sometimes she had doubted that she would ever be able to witness this historic moment.

“I think sometimes we still pinch ourselves thinking that we’ve finally been recognized after so many years.”

LaPlante was 16 when she first joined a local MMF south of Boissevain. It’s amazing how far the organization has come since its launch in 1967, she said.

The MMF has faced adversity over the years that has taken hard work and dedication to overcome, LaPlante said, but the end result has been the empowering experience of forging treaty rights and self-reliance. governmental.

“When it’s in your heart. When it’s your people. When you’re telling your story and wanting to make people’s lives better, you’re really trapped and I think that’s part of who you are.

The Manitoba Métis Recognition and Implementation Agreement marks a moment of empowerment for Métis citizens, she said, and for younger generations who take over from their parents who are fighting for these rights. since many years.

She was impressed by the number of young people who attended the assembly and who pledged to fight for the future of Métis citizens.

Youth are essential Métis citizens, she said, as they will move the MMF forward into the future while listening to elders to understand the stories of the past. They need to know the struggle that unfolded to see where they want to go.

“It’s the perfect learning experience for teens to sit, listen and ask questions.”

Over 2,000 Métis citizens attended the in-person assembly at Assiniboine Downs over the weekend. Although most health measures related to the COVID-19 pandemic have been lifted across Manitoba, the organization continues to focus on the safety of its citizens, including proof of vaccination, wearing mask and sanitation in the meeting.

LaPlante is part of the team of justice, constitutional, natural resources and citizenship ministers who have worked on constitutional changes over the past two years. The final product of the federation-approved resolutions will recognize the MMF as the pre-existing democratic representative government of the Métis of Manitoba, which has the responsibility to provide responsible and accountable self-government to its Red River Métis citizens.

“We are going to grow in a very big way, there are exciting times ahead.”

Chelsea Kemp Isa Local Journalism Initiative reporter who works at the Brandon Sun. The Local Journalism Initiative is funded by the Government of Canada. Turtle Island News does not receive funding from the LJI government.

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Self government

Florida lawmakers consider stripping Disney of its power of self-government

Two Floridian powers clash again. On Monday, Governor Ron DeSantis spoke about Disney in what became the latest development in an ongoing battle. The back-and-forth comes after the company denounced the state’s new “Don’t Say Gay” law, as critics call it. This week, lawmakers said they were considering stripping Disney of some of its power in the state. Years before Cinderella Castle opened, Walt Disney himself proposed to state legislators that Disney World have authority over the territory. Months after his death in December 1966, the Governor and Legislature in 1967 granted the society, under the leadership of Walt’s brother Roy, the creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, to govern the property that would eventually become Disney World. But now Disney’s independence is under the microscope following the company’s denunciation of Florida’s new ‘Parental Rights in Education’ law, or the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ law. “. In a tweet, State Rep. Spencer Roach, who represents the North Fort Myers area, wrote that lawmakers have already met twice to discuss repealing the Reedy Creek Improvement Act. He said, “If Disney wants to embrace the woke ideology, it seems appropriate that they should be regulated by Orange County.” On Friday, DeSantis said he supports lawmakers’ review of Disney’s power. “They basically put this one company on a pedestal and treated it differently, not only than other companies, but even other theme parks,” DeSantis said. Under Florida law, Reedy Creek landowners, like Disney, can regulate their own water, electricity, and emergency services. DeSantis said their power doesn’t end there. “I was shocked to see some of the things. They can build their own nuclear power plant. Is there any other private company in the state that can just build a nuclear power plant on their own?” to do things that no one else can do. So I think they’re right to look at that and reevaluate and have a level playing field for everybody I think that’s way better than basically to allow a company to be a law on itself.” So what are the chances of Florida dethroning Disney? “Right now, I would say, it’s more talking than doing. Surprise me,” said Aubrey Jewett, a UCF political science professor. “If I were Disney, I would definitely take this threat seriously.” He said this battle between DeSantis and Disney could get a lot uglier. before it gets better. just, to me, shocking and usual to see the head of disney and the governor of florida shoot each other. and i haven’t seen anything like it in florida politics for 30 years let me study it,” Jewett said. As for what happens next with the Reedy Creek Improvement District, the governor said it was up to the Florida legislature to decide. “I as governor could be presented with changes to that, and I think I said I would be receptive to that, but ultimately the legislature would have to move on,” said DeSantis. WESH 2 News has contacted Disney. The company has not responded, but in a previous statement it pledged to have the Parental Rights in Education Act repealed or struck down by the courts.

Two Floridian powers clash again.

On Monday, Governor Ron DeSantis spoke about Disney in what became the latest development in an ongoing battle. The back-and-forth comes after the company denounced the state’s new “Don’t Say Gay” law, as critics call it.

This week, lawmakers said they were considering stripping Disney of some of its power in the state.

Years before Cinderella Castle opened, Walt Disney himself proposed to state legislators that Disney World have authority over the territory. Months after his death in December 1966, the Governor and Legislature in 1967 granted the company, under the leadership of Walt’s brother Roy, the creation of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, to govern the property that would eventually become DisneyWorld.

But now Disney’s independence is under the microscope following the company’s denunciation of Florida’s new “parental rights in education” law, or the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

In a tweet, State Rep. Spencer Roach, who represents the North Fort Myers area, wrote that lawmakers have already met twice to discuss repealing the Reedy Creek Improvement Act.

He said, “If Disney wants to embrace the woke ideology, it seems appropriate that they be regulated by Orange County.”

On Friday, DeSantis said he supports lawmakers’ review of Disney’s power.

“They basically put this one company on a pedestal and treated it differently, not just from other companies, but even from other theme parks,” DeSantis said.

Under Florida law, Reedy Creek landowners, like Disney, can regulate their own water, electric, and emergency services. DeSantis said their power doesn’t end there.

“I was shocked to see some of the stuff in there. They can build their own nuclear power plant. Is there any other private company in the state that can build a nuclear power plant by itself? ” he said. “They are able to do certain things that no one else is able to do. So I think they’re right to look at that and re-evaluate and have a level playing field for everybody I think that’s a lot better than allowing a company to be a law on it -same.

So what are the chances of Florida dethroning Disney?

“Right now I would say it’s more talking than doing. But that said, this governor and this legislature would not surprise me,” said Aubrey Jewett, professor of political science at UCF. “If I were Disney, I would definitely take this threat seriously.”

He said this battle between DeSantis and Disney could get a lot uglier before it gets better.

“It’s just, to me, shocking and customary to see the head of Disney and the Governor of Florida shoot each other. And I haven’t seen anything like it in Florida politics in the 30 years I’ve studied it. “said Jewett.

As for what happens next with the Reedy Creek Improvement District, the governor said it’s up to the Florida legislature to decide.

“I as governor could be presented with changes to that, and I think I said I would be receptive to that, but ultimately the legislature would have to move forward,” DeSantis said.

WESH 2 News has contacted Disney. The company has not responded, but in a previous statement it pledged to have the Parental Rights in Education Act repealed or struck down by the courts.

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Home rule

House Republicans threaten DC Home Rule

President Biden’s recently proposed budget has drawn attention to the District of Columbia’s lack of control over its own affairs. The budget would preserve a longstanding congressional ban on DC using its own tax funds to implement a legal cannabis sales system similar to those enacted in many other states and localities across the country. This ban was crafted by a Maryland congressman in direct contradiction to the wishes of the residents of the district.

The continuation of the ban follows a promise by leading House Republicans to further curtail the district’s already limited control over its own affairs if they regain Congress midterm. In fact, some have gone so far as to call for the complete repeal of the Home Rule Act, which allows for municipal government elected by DC residents.

These threats are a reminder of just how fragile DC’s local autonomy is. They also stress the importance of DC statehood not only to ensure fair representation in Congress, but also to ensure that residents of the district have the same rights enjoyed by their fellow citizens, having a say in the rules that govern their life.

Self-reliance in DC, historically a majority black city and always plural, has always been a major civil rights concern. Since 1973, the Home Rule Act has allowed residents to elect their own mayor and their representatives to a 13-member city council. Residents and activists have fought for nearly two centuries to reach even this limited democratic stage. They faced fierce opposition from segregationists in Congress who were quick to invoke white supremacy to justify the complete disenfranchisement of residents of the district.

The Civil Rights Movement, the leadership of advocates, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 underscored the importance of DC’s autonomy. By allowing southern blacks to register to vote, the law upended many southern congressional districts and provided momentum for the passage of the Home Rule Act.

But home rule was only a partial victory. The District Clause of the Constitution gives Congress the ability “to exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatever” within the district. The Home Rule Act ceded some of this power, but Congress reserved the right to veto any municipal policy and retained extensive control of local district tax revenues, which must still be disbursed by the through Congressional appropriations.

This has significant implications for DC residents. The ban on cannabis sales is one example among many. In 1992, Congress reversed a measure passed by the district to extend health insurance coverage to domestic partners of single municipal workers. From 1998 to 2007, Congress blocked the district from using local taxpayer money for a needle exchange program. For all but four years since 1988, Congress has prohibited DC from using local funds to provide abortion services to Medicaid recipients, disproportionately impacting women of color in the district. By making these decisions, some members of Congress deliberately subvert the will of DC residents to impose their own agenda. Others noted the “racist-tinged paternalistic attitude” behind many of these decisions.

These same attitudes now threaten the limited gains DC has made. Opponents of Home Rule cite issues like crime, which is on the rise nationally and for which DC is not an outlier. In doing so, they increasingly resorted to the kind of anti-democratic and racist rhetoric that had previously been used to justify denying DC residents the right to vote. DC Mayor Muriel Bowser, the district’s second black female mayor, has often been the target of this rhetoric.

This backlash is brewing just as Congress is getting closer than ever to making DC a state. The House passed HR 51, the Washington, D.C. Admissions Act, for the first time in 2020 and again in 2021. The bill’s Senate counterpart, S. 51, was heard in committee at during the current session of Congress.

DC, with nearly 700,000 residents, has more residents than Vermont and Wyoming and a population similar to several other states. No other country singles out residents of its own capital for disenfranchisement in this way. And yet, even the maintenance of a limited autonomy seems threatened.

Without statehood, DC residents will remain deprived of real control over their own affairs and their limited agency will continue to be exposed to further erosion. Statehood ensures that residents have the same voice in the local laws that govern their lives and say in our national life that their fellow citizens enjoy. It is high time to grant neighborhood residents the right to fully participate in our democracy.

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Home rule

Alachua City Mayor Gib Coerper Receives 2022 Home Rule Hero Award

Alachua City Press Release

the Florida Towns League (FLC), celebrating its 100th anniversary as the united voice of Florida municipal governments, recently presented Alachua City Mayor Gib Coerper with a 2022 Home Rule Hero Award for his hard work and advocacy efforts during of the 2022 legislative session. Coerper worked tirelessly throughout the session to promote local voices making local choices, protect the Home Rule powers of Florida municipalities, and advance the League’s legislative agenda.

“On behalf of the League and its legislative team, we are very proud to present this year’s Home Rule Hero Awards to a deserving group of civic leaders,” said Casey Cook, FLC Director of Legislative Affairs. “We had a record number of Home Rule Heroes this year, which shows the dedication and impact of local authorities on behalf of their residents and businesses in protecting local decision-making. These local leaders have been consistently engaged and actively defending their communities throughout the 2022 legislative session. They are Home Rule heroes, and we thank them for their efforts.

Autonomy is the ability of a city to solve local problems with local solutions with minimal state interference. Home Rule Hero Award recipients are local government officials, elected and unelected, who have always responded to the League’s request to contact members of the legislature and help provide a local perspective on an issue.

“I am very honored to have been selected for this honor,” Coerper said. “I’ve always believed that the government closest to its community should be the one that makes decisions based on that community’s best interests, and Home Rule allows municipalities like Alachua to do just that.”


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Self government

Gwich’in get a glimpse of what self-government would look like

On the second day of the Gwich’in Tribal Council’s Annual General Meeting in Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Grand Chief Ken Kyikavichik painted a picture of what a Gwich’in government might look like.

“The current model of service delivery by the Government of the Northwest Territories is simply not working for our people,” Kyikavichik said. And he said the Indian Act “continues to diminish the role and authority of band councils in our communities.

“The Gwich’in government, in our view, offers opportunities to change that.”

The Gwich’in Tribal Council has been negotiating a self-government agreement for over two decades. This work began shortly after the Gwich’in signed a land claims agreement in 1992.

Gwich’in Tribal Council Grand Chief Ken Kyikavichik said Wednesday he wanted to clarify why, after more than two decades of negotiations, the council continues to pursue the establishment of its own government. (Mackenzie Scott/CBC)

How a Gwich’in government would be structured, its powers and how long it would take to put it in place were the focus of discussions at the Gwich’in Tribal Council on Wednesday.

Kyikavichik said self-government negotiations have been divisive in the past. He wanted to clarify why, after all these years, the Gwich’in Tribal Council continues to pursue the establishment of its own government.

“First and foremost, we need a more effective government system for the Gwich’in,” he said.

Kyikavichik presented a list of goals for a Gwich’in government. They include: reconnecting with land and culture; language revitalization; improve people’s health and quality of life; improve homes and infrastructure; create jobs and business opportunities; and include youth and elders in decision-making.

Dinjii Zhuh Regional Government

Under the draft agreement in principle, Kyikavichik said, the Gwich’in Tribal Council would become the Dinjii Zhuh regional government. He would have a great leader (Dinjii Iisrits’at Chit) and its capital would be Fort McPherson, NWT

Within the Dinjii Zhuh government, Fort McPherson, Aklavik, Tsiigehtchic and Inuvik would each have a local government with its own leader (Dinjii Khehkai) and the board.

The Dinjii Zhuh government would serve as a “coordinating body” and represent the Gwich’in in meetings with the governments of the Northwest Territories and Canada, Kyikavichik said.

“That’s what our tribal council, or our Dinjii Zhuh regional government, should be about, it’s about supporting our communities, not consolidating power,” he said.

Currently, Kyikavichik said, each of the four communities has a Gwich’in council president and a band council chief, which is confusing.

The Dinjii Zhuh government would merge the Indian Act band council and designated Gwich’in organization from each community into one government.

The municipal governments of the four communities would remain.

“We’re not targeting public government, which includes non-Gwich’in governance,” Kyikavichik said.

“We are opting for aboriginal government, which involves only our Gwich’in people, and governance in the Gwich’in settlement area outside of municipal boundaries.

Power of taxation

Money is obviously an important part of actualizing self-government.

“We don’t want this government unless we have the money to be able to deliver,” Kyikavichik said.

He said the ability to impose taxes, such as a liquor tax, would help generate the cash needed to provide government services.

The prospect of taxing powers was welcomed by Willard Hagen, a delegate representing the Nihtat Gwich’in Council in Inuvik.

“Self-government without taxation…is an oxymoron,” he said.

“You’re not self-sufficient if you don’t have your own free-flowing funding.”

The process can take years or even decades

To be sure, building responsible government for things like health care, justice, and education systems is a daunting task.

For this reason, Kyikavichik said, the Gwich’in Tribal Council has decided to focus on seven “primary jurisdictions” in its final agreement negotiations with the governments of Canada and the Northwest Territories.

They are: governance, fiscal relations, land, housing, culture and language, taxation and economic development.

After a final agreement is reached, the Gwich’in government would seek to take over services such as education, justice, health and income support – a process that would likely take more than 15 years, said Kyikavichik.

The Gwich’in government could also explore responsibility for the regulation of alcohol and cannabis, marriage, adoption and gambling.

The goal is to finalize a tentative agreement and have it approved at the Gwich’in Tribal Council’s next annual general meeting in August, Kyikavichik said.

“The tentative agreement stage allows us to engage with our people,” he said.

The tentative agreement would then be submitted to Canada for approval, which Kyikavichik said could take more than a year.

The Grand Chief estimated that final discussions on the self-government agreement would take three to five years. The council has set 2027 as the year it hopes to finalize an agreement with the Gwich’in government.

This process is not the only option, however.

Kyikavichik said they could also choose to skip the tentative agreement phase and go straight to final deal talks, or put the entire process on hold.

Some delegates urged the assembly to move forward.

“Let’s not take a break, let’s not take a break. We have so many successful Gwich’in working for us,” said Barry Greenland, a director of the Nihtat Gwich’in Council.

“We can’t sell ourselves short saying we can’t do it.”

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Home rule

Reviews | DC should focus on expanding the domestic regime before becoming a state

Statehood is long overdue and warranted for a population that exceeds that of Vermont and Wyoming and nearly matches that of several western states. The House, in a majority partisan vote, passed a DC state bill. The Senate did not take up the bill and it is unlikely to pass it. Republicans in the Senate do not want the two additional Democratic senators that DC would bring. A subsidiary factor is that residents of Maryland and Virginia who work in DC could face a commuter tax, which would reduce incomes in Maryland and Virginia.

In the immediate future, DC should seek to extend its autonomy. In anticipation of that distant day when justice trumps political expediency and DC gains statehood, activists should seek to expand DC’s authority to govern its residents by removing or changing restrictions that were imposed as a necessary compromise to achieve limited autonomy in 1973. .

A bill before the DC Council illustrates the problem. To reduce over-incarceration in federal prisons, particularly of young black people, the bill provides that all persons under the age of 21 charged with a crime will be prosecuted in juvenile court, except where circumstances warrant that the DC attorney general is seeking a court order to send the case to adult criminal court. It’s a good idea, except it violates the Home Rule Act, which provides that the DC Council cannot pass any legislation that would alter or modify the powers of the US Attorney. Under pre-autonomy laws, the U.S. attorney can file criminal charges directly in adult court against youths 16 and older who are charged with very serious offenses. And the U.S. Attorney’s Office can charge anyone 18 or older who allegedly violates a local criminal law.

More generally, there is no good political reason for local crimes to be prosecuted exclusively by the federally appointed US Attorney and not the locally elected DC Attorney General. This authority is different from the arrangement in any of the 50 states, where the US Attorney’s office prosecutes federal crimes and the local prosecutor handles locally enacted crimes. This change would allow the local population to control basic political decisions relating to crime. For example, while local people have made clear their opposition to the death penalty, the federal government, at least under the previous presidential administration, was keen to carry out death sentences. Likewise, differences have emerged over marijuana policy between the local government and the federal government. Putting the prosecution of local crimes in the hands of a locally elected prosecutor would give DC residents more of a say in crime-fighting policies.

A revision to the Home Rule Act could also give exclusive control of DC’s budget to the locally elected government. The Home Rule Act provides that Congress has ultimate and exclusive control over DC’s budget. The situation is confusing due to two conflicting court decisions relating to the DC Budget Autonomy Act passed by the DC Council several years ago. A federal district court ruled that the local act, giving final authority over locally collected revenues to the DC Council, violated the Congressional Autonomy Act and the federal Antideficiency Act (which prohibits federal governments and DC to expend funds not appropriated by Congress) and was therefore invalid and unenforceable. A subsequent DC Superior Court decision affirmed that the budget law was consistent with these federal laws. Neither decision has been appealed. The DC Council and Congress acted as if each had the final say on DC’s budget. The problem is simmering, unresolved. This potential conflict could be resolved if Congress amended the Home Rule Act and allowed local government full control of its locally collected budget and the final decision on how tax revenues imposed locally on DC residents are spent.

Another salutary change to the Home Rule Act would allow the mayor to appoint local judges with the approval of the DC Council rather than requiring a presidential nomination with the consent of the Senate. Although presidential nominations over the past few years have been strong, the Senate has not been diligent or responsive to the confirmation process, resulting in extended vacancies in the DC Superior Court and the DC Court of Appeals. DC, leading to massive delays in resolving cases and charges against judges in the seat. There is no valid political reason to involve the federal government in the selection of local judges. In all 50 states, the selection of local judges is handled locally, either by election or appointment. Local appointment would not reduce the quality of the local justice system and would likely eliminate the extended vacancies that have such a deleterious effect on justice for DC residents.

The compromises that were necessary to get the Home Rule Act passed are no longer necessary or beneficial. The performance of the DC government over the past 50 years, and especially over the past decades, has demonstrated that it is well equipped to manage its own affairs, free from federal government control or oversight. If statehood is not possible now, Congress should quickly review and remove many of the Home Rule Act’s limitations so that DC residents can better control their own governance.

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Home rule

Bill banning city bans on plastics throws home rule and environment, reps say

TOPEKA — Some Kansas officials say a recently legislature-approved ban on municipalities limiting plastic items tramples local control and will cause problems for ecosystems across the state.

Senate Bill 493 would ban restrictions and taxes on bags, cups, containers, and other plastic, cardboard, glass, and aluminum packaging, among others. Backers say the measure will ensure a uniform policy around these containers and support local businesses.

But opponents said the bill would not address the buildup of waste accumulated from these items. Even supporters of the bill did not dispute the negative effect of plastic bags on the environment, Rep. Rui Xu said.

“They take 400 years to decompose. They litter our roads. They lit up our waterways,” the Westwood Democrat told the House on Tuesday. “It’s a classic case of the tragedy of the commons. What is good for the individual at the moment may not be good collectively for our environment.

Representatives approved the measure 74 to 48 on Thursday, exactly a month after the Senate voted in favor, 27 to 13. The bill is heading to Governor Laura Kelly for consideration and appears to lack support in the House to overturn a veto.

Rep. Pat Proctor, a Fort Leavenworth Republican and restaurant owner, said the measure would give businesses facing uncertain times peace of mind by ensuring access to plastic bags doesn’t become a future chain issue. supply.

“Every product doubled in price,” Proctor said of one restaurant owner. “Now what you are going to do in these municipalities is you are going to put this extra cost on the restaurants where they have to use paper boxes. What you’re doing is you’re not dealing with restaurants.

While some regions such as Wichita may consider banning plastic bags, Xu noted that these are just conversations with a working group and nothing official has been decided. Promulgating something based on discussions is not good practice, he said.

Rep. Boog Highberger, a Democrat from Lawrence, said municipalities are considering the bans because the state government is doing too little to address the environmental issues facing Kansas and the world.

“We were facing a very, very serious environmental crisis, and we are doing nothing,” Highberger said. “While I personally wouldn’t necessarily support a ban like this, I think my city government should definitely have the right to consider enacting one.”

Rep. Brad Ralph, a Republican from Dodge City, said he doesn’t care much one way or another about plastic bags, but he took issue with such a clear violation of the indoor rule. He told lawmakers they needed to heed the Kansans’ expressed desire to maintain local control and set policies for their own community.

Two or three municipalities enacting bans on plastic containers aren’t enough patchwork to abandon a constitutional principle, Ralph said.

“The idea that we wouldn’t trust local government preemptively tells us we can’t do that,” Ralph said. “The people of the state of Kansas have told us directly and specifically in this constitution that we must trust them and that we must give them the greatest measure of self-government.”

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Home rule

Home Rule Rules Edition – Streetsblog New York City

From the dispatch office: The mayor hasn’t done much to keep the streets safe since he was sworn in, but he will be heading to Brooklyn’s Ditmas Park neighborhood this morning to demand that lawmakers of Albany give the city control of its automated speeding, red-light monitoring systems and bus lanes, as well as the ability to set its own speed limits.

It’s a key part of the safe streets movement’s agenda — hats off to Transportation Alternatives — but it all leaves us feeling a bit disappointed. After all, there are loads of things the mayor can do to make the roads safer, our communities more livable, and improve bus service without having to worry about what Albany does or doesn’t do. So, fair warning, we’ll ask the presser about it. And we’ll also try to ask about our scoop this week on the NYPD’s failure to really crack down on reckless drivers.

That said, Hizzoner picked a good spot to ask for house rule on speed cameras because last month a pedestrian was run over and killed by a speeding driver just five blocks away. The member of the council of the region is delighted:

“Traffic violence is a silent killer in our neighborhoods, and we need to work to address it as soon as possible,” Council Member Rita Joseph said. “Albany must give New York local control to end road violence or more lives will be needlessly lost. I thank Mayor Adams for using his platform to speak boldly and decisively on this issue. I fully support his efforts to try to get Albany to pass local traffic enforcement.It doesn’t make sense for Buffalo politicians to decide on speed limits in Brooklyn.

In other news from a busy daytime:

  • In a major change, yellow cab drivers will now be able to register with Uber, which some experts say will help them get more rides, but some feared it could lead to lower wages. (NY Post, amNY and NY Times following the Wall Street Journal; Gothamist wisely did a second-day take.)
  • Councilman Bob Holden of Queens continues to make progress towards the livable streets movement, thanks to a resolution he introduced yesterday calling on Albany to pass legislation that would punish drivers who incorrectly register their cars off the State. (NYC Council)
  • In a related, albeit contrary, move, council member Nantasha Williams, also from Queens, introduced a bill that would allow the DOT to issue parking signs for pregnant women (and which would expire within 30 days of the due date). What could go wrong with the show of tens of thousands After placards? (NYC Council)
  • A man shot and killed another man after a simple clash. (NYDN)
  • Speaking of insane road rage, Council member Justin Brannan tweeted some details about a fight over a parking space, which the Daily News eventually covered:
  • Well, at least one reckless driver — in this case, the donut-making dick who allegedly ran over a man in Lower Manhattan — has had his license temporarily suspended. (NYDN, New York Post)
  • There weren’t many details, but the Post is confident Governor Hochul’s Interborough Express could somehow provide service to LaGuardia Airport. That’s a bit of old news because, as reported by Streetsblog, the Port Authority has previously said it’s considering several routes, including some from the Roosevelt-74th Street station in Jackson Heights. At amNY, Kevin Duggan’s coverage was a little brighter.
  • Sometimes you wish the DOT would defend itself better against community boards that allow cars and parking-obsessed pols. When residents of Maspeth complained at a community board meeting that some “parking spots” would be lost to accommodate the next phase of Citi Bike’s expansion, it would have been nice to hear a DOT spokesperson say, “Citi Bike has just come off a year with record ridership, and the system, which is a vital part of the transit system, has been a lifeline during Covid and will help us reduce car use, which will improve the quality of life and help ward off the adverse effects of climate change. And, yes, we’re talking to you, council member Holden. But they never do that! (Long Island City Post Office)
  • Blue gold! Brace for land rape to come for battery minerals like cobalt and lithium as President Biden prepares to evoke a national emergency (The Intercept)
  • The Post is always keen to point out how New York is dying. First, he reported (again!) on our epic population loss during Covid, then, in a follow-up, blamed the crime.
  • If you want to hang out with some nice people, our friends at Open Plans will be at Saturday’s “Spring Celebration” from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on W. 103rd Street in Manhattan, which everyone (except a few NIMBY block associations) wants to be transformed into an open street from park to park. Make your opinion known to the DOT while enjoying live music and dance performances (you to know Jody Sperling will be there!).
  • But if you’re in Brooklyn on Saturday and Sunday, stop by Pacific Street for dozens of front porch sales in support of Ukraine. (Lincoln Restler Council Member)
  • And, finally, we’re not going to suggest that President Biden has had more than 14 flawless months in office, but criticizing him for riding a bike sounds a bit like toxic masculinity, especially coming from the son of a president known for playing a lot golf.

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Home rule

Bill banning city bans on plastics throws house rule, environment, reps say – The Lawrence Times

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TOPEKA — Some Kansas officials say a recently legislature-approved ban on municipalities limiting plastic items tramples local control and will cause problems for ecosystems across the state.

Senate Bill 493 would ban restrictions and taxes on bags, cups, containers, and other plastic, cardboard, glass, and aluminum packaging, among others. Backers say the measure will ensure a uniform policy around these containers and support local businesses.

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But opponents said the bill would not address the buildup of waste accumulated from these items. Even supporters of the bill did not dispute the negative effect of plastic bags on the environment, Rep. Rui Xu said.

“They take 400 years to decompose. They litter our roads. They litter our waterways,” the Westwood Democrat told the House on Tuesday. “It’s a classic case of the tragedy of the commons. What is good for the individual at the moment may not be good collectively for our environment.

Representatives approved the measure 74 to 48 on Thursday, exactly a month after the Senate voted in favor, 27 to 13. The bill is heading to Governor Laura Kelly for consideration and appears to lack support in the House to overturn a veto.

Rep. Pat Proctor, a Fort Leavenworth Republican and restaurant owner, said the measure would give businesses facing uncertain times peace of mind by ensuring access to plastic bags doesn’t become a future chain issue. supply.

“Every product has doubled in price,” Proctor said of one restaurant owner. “Now what you are going to do in these municipalities is you are going to put this extra cost on the restaurants where they have to use paper boxes. What you’re doing is you’re putting prices on restaurants so they don’t do business.

While some regions such as Wichita may consider banning plastic bags, Xu noted that these are just conversations with a working group and nothing official has been decided. Promulgating something based on discussions is not good practice, he said.

Rep. Boog Highberger, a Democrat from Lawrence, said municipalities are considering the bans because the state government is doing too little to address the environmental issues facing Kansas and the world.

“We were facing a very, very serious environmental crisis, and we are doing nothing,” Highberger said. “While I personally wouldn’t necessarily support a ban like this, I think my city government should definitely have the right to consider enacting one.”

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Rep. Brad Ralph, a Republican from Dodge City, said he doesn’t care much one way or another about plastic bags, but he took issue with such a clear violation of the indoor rule. He told lawmakers they should heed the Kansans’ expressed desire to maintain local control and set policies for their own community.

Two or three municipalities enacting bans on plastic containers aren’t enough patchwork to abandon a constitutional principle, Ralph said.

“The idea that we wouldn’t trust local government on the face of it tells us we can’t do this,” Ralph said. “The people of the state of Kansas have told us directly and specifically in this constitution that we must trust them and that we must give them the greatest measure of self-government.”

Kansas Reflector is part of States Newsroom, a grant-supported network of news outlets and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Kansas Reflector maintains editorial independence. Contact publisher Sherman Smith with any questions: [email protected] Follow Kansas Reflector on Facebook and Twitter.

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Want more state news? See our Kansas News page at this link. You can read Associated Press coverage of the Kansas stories and more online here.

The Lawrence Times republishes many, but not all, stories from the Kansas Reflector. Learn more about their coverage here. We also frequently republish articles from the Kansas News Service. Learn more about their coverage here.

More coverage:


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Sierra Club lobbyist Zack Pistora told lawmakers he could talk at length about the “big mess” plastic bags have created for Kansas’s aquatic ecosystems, landscape and infrastructure.


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The Sustainability Advisory Council discussed an order on Wednesday that would require establishments to charge customers 15 cents per disposable paper or plastic bag used, ultimately sending it to the climate change subcommittee for review.


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On Wednesday, the Sustainability Advisory Council will reconsider, and may vote on, a proposed order that would require establishments to charge customers 15 cents per single-use disposable bag for any purchase.

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Home rule

County Line Split, House Rule Discussed at Erie Candidates Forum – Longmont Times-Call

Candidates for the Erie board of directors competed on topics including self-reliance, diversity and best practices when governing a city that straddles two counties during Wednesday’s virtual candidates forum. evening.

More than 70 residents watched the online forum, which was sponsored by the Erie Chamber of Commerce and the League of Women Voters of Boulder County (LWVBC). Five of the six candidates vying for three board seats next month – Dan Hoback, Emily Baer, ​​Jeff Haverkate, Andrew Sawusch and incumbent Christiaan van Woudenberg, who is also the only current director running for the re-election, participated. Due to work commitments, contestant Ryan Kenward was unable to participate.

LWVBC member Martine Elianor moderated the discussion by asking questions selected from submissions received from residents prior to the forum.

Elianor asked the candidates to address the issue of unity within the city of Erie, which is split between Boulder County and Weld County. Ironically, this question turned out to be one of the most controversial topics discussed during the forum.

Several candidates have criticized the current council’s decision earlier this year to maintain Boulder County’s mask mandates and the declaration of an emergency throughout Erie.

Haverkate was perhaps the most vocal critic of the cross-county mask mandate, saying, “I think taking one county’s set of rules and imposing them on other people when we don’t have our own health service is an overreach of the government.

Sawusch agreed that the city does not have the authority to extend a public health mandate across counties and pledged to focus on transparency and open communication when managing inter-county crises at the ‘coming.

On the other hand, Baer argued that the city’s decision to honor mask mandates helped health care workers and hospitals, and that by wearing masks, the city was taking care of each other.

“It’s important that we all recognize that we are all more alike than different,” Baer said of the split between the two counties.

Van Woudenberg and Hoback agreed that the choice to maintain mask mandates across county lines allowed for greater continuity throughout Erie.

“The emergency declaration has also made it easier to help businesses and residents through the pandemic beyond just a mask mandate,” Hoback pointed out.

While most candidates expressed confidence in the city’s ability to govern itself by moving to self-government during their tenure, Sawusch, who works as Erie’s city planning commissioner, was skeptical of the change. that would happen in the next four years.

“The city does not currently have the resources at the town hall, it does not have the necessary current staff and it also does not have the confidence in the management of the town hall to move to autonomy”, he said. -he declares.

Some candidates had similar approaches to increasing city revenue.

Haverkate’s and Sawusch’s responses both called for the development of Erie, which would also encourage Erie residents to work and spend money in their hometown instead of commuting.

Baer was also in favor of focusing on developing Erie to increase revenue, but stressed the need to also take care of the small businesses that already exist in Erie. Hoback agreed, citing the need to reinvest all revenue back into the city.

Van Woudenburg echoed similar beliefs regarding increased income, but specifically detailed the need for affordable housing options in the city.

“People who work in Erie deserve to live here. The key to attracting primary jobs is to provide housing opportunities for people who should be working in these businesses,” he said.

Residents also submitted questions to candidates about their views on oil and gas, diversity, traffic congestion, open spaces, and maintaining the delicate balance between commercial development and the natural beauty of Erie.

To hear all of the contestants’ questions and answers, visit bit.ly/3D8gkHh.

Erie’s municipal election is scheduled for April 5. All ballots have been mailed to registered voters.

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Home rule

Division of Counties, House Rule Discussed at Erie Candidates Forum – Colorado Hometown Weekly

Candidates for the Erie board of directors competed on topics including self-reliance, diversity and best practices when governing a city that straddles two counties during Wednesday’s virtual candidates forum. evening.

More than 70 residents watched the online forum, which was sponsored by the Erie Chamber of Commerce and the League of Women Voters of Boulder County (LWVBC). Five of the six candidates vying for three board seats next month – Dan Hoback, Emily Baer, ​​Jeff Haverkate, Andrew Sawusch and incumbent Christiaan van Woudenberg, who is also the only current director running for the re-election, participated. Due to work commitments, contestant Ryan Kenward was unable to participate.

LWVBC member Martine Elianor moderated the discussion by asking questions selected from submissions received from residents prior to the forum.

Elianor asked the candidates to address the issue of unity within the city of Erie, which is split between Boulder County and Weld County. Ironically, this question turned out to be one of the most controversial topics discussed during the forum.

Several candidates have criticized the current council’s decision earlier this year to maintain Boulder County’s mask mandates and the declaration of an emergency throughout Erie.

Haverkate was perhaps the most vocal critic of the cross-county mask mandate, saying, “I think taking one county’s set of rules and imposing them on other people when we don’t have our own health service is an overreach of the government.

Sawusch agreed that the city does not have the authority to extend a public health mandate across counties and pledged to focus on transparency and open communication when managing inter-county crises at the ‘coming.

On the other hand, Baer argued that the city’s decision to honor mask mandates helped health care workers and hospitals, and that by wearing masks, the city was taking care of each other.

“It’s important that we all recognize that we are all more alike than different,” Baer said of the split between the two counties.

Van Woudenberg and Hoback agreed that the choice to maintain mask mandates across county lines allowed for greater continuity throughout Erie.

“The emergency declaration has also made it easier to help businesses and residents through the pandemic beyond just a mask mandate,” Hoback pointed out.

While most candidates expressed confidence in the city’s ability to govern itself by moving to self-government during their tenure, Sawusch, who works as Erie’s city planning commissioner, was skeptical of the change. that would happen in the next four years.

“The city does not currently have the resources at the town hall, it does not have the necessary current staff and it also does not have the confidence in the management of the town hall to move to autonomy”, he said. -he declares.

Some candidates had similar approaches to increasing city revenue.

Haverkate’s and Sawusch’s responses both called for the development of Erie, which would also encourage Erie residents to work and spend money in their hometown instead of commuting.

Baer was also in favor of focusing on developing Erie to increase revenue, but stressed the need to also take care of the small businesses that already exist in Erie. Hoback agreed, citing the need to reinvest all revenue back into the city.

Van Woudenburg echoed similar beliefs regarding increased income, but specifically detailed the need for affordable housing options in the city.

“People who work in Erie deserve to live here. The key to attracting primary jobs is to provide housing opportunities for people who should be working in these businesses,” he said.

Residents also submitted questions to candidates about their views on oil and gas, diversity, traffic congestion, open spaces, and maintaining the delicate balance between commercial development and the natural beauty of Erie.

To hear all the contestants’ questions and answers, visit bit.ly/3D8gkHh.

Erie’s municipal election is scheduled for April 5. All ballots have been mailed to registered voters.

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Self government

Self-government in Peril: Commentary on the Quebec Court of Appeal’s Reference to An Act Respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis Children, Youth and Families – Government, public sector

The Quebec Court of Appeal has obstructed the federal government’s efforts to address the overrepresentation of Indigenous children in the child and youth protection system. On February 10, 2022, the Court ruled that key sections of the federal government An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families (the “Act“) were unconstitutional. Act aims to ensure that Indigenous children receive a minimum level of services and enables Indigenous governing bodies to develop child protection solutions. Although the Court concluded that there is an “Aboriginal right” to self-government in child and family services, affirmed by section 35 of the Canadian Constitution (theConstitution“), the Court invalidated Articles 21 and 22(3) of the Act who provided
real self-determination on these issues. The Court’s decision leaves us with a contradiction: it affirms the existence of the right of Aboriginal self-government but annuls the provisions of the Act which has made it possible to exercise this right in a meaningful way.

A look at the Act

the Act was jointly developed by the federal government and Indigenous partners and came into effect on January 1, 2020. It seeks to affirm the right of Indigenous peoples to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services and, by extension, the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (“UNDRIP“) in Canada. the
Act also establishes “national standards” that guarantee a minimum level of services for all Aboriginal children.

Under the Act, Aboriginal governing bodies can either pass their own laws regarding child and family services or seek to enter into a coordination agreement with the federal and provincial governments. Prior to the Court’s decision, Sections 21 and 22(3) provided that Indigenous laws passed under a coordination agreement had the same force of law as federal laws and prevailed over any conflicting or inconsistent provisions of the laws. applicable federal or provincial authorities.

Controversy

Two weeks after its entry into force, the Government of Quebec is asking its Court of Appeal to rule on the question of whether the
Act is unconstitutional. The Attorney General of Quebec argued that the Act undermines the province’s general jurisdiction over child welfare and unilaterally alters the scope of section 35, threatening the structure of the Constitution. Canada responded that issues under the Act falls within the broad reach of the federal government’s authority over Aboriginal peoples under section 91(24) of the Constitution and that the ActThe interpretation of section 35 is consistent with case law.

Constitutionality of the Act

The Court’s constitutional analysis focused on two elements: the constitutionality of national standards and the Aboriginal right to self-government in the regulation of child and family services. The Court concluded the Act is constitutional, with the exception of sections 21 and 22(3).

On the first element, the Court held that subsection 91(24) grants the federal government jurisdiction over the welfare of Indigenous peoples and their interpersonal relationships. the
Act fully falls within this jurisdiction because its purpose is to “[ensure] the well-being of [Indigenous] children, promoting culturally appropriate services to reduce their overrepresentation in provincial child welfare systems” (para. 34). The Court also concluded that the Act does not dictate how provinces are to provide child and family services in Indigenous spaces, as national standards are consistent with provincial child welfare legislation.

Ultimately, Quebec’s position that the Actcontrary to the principles of federalism and democracy was rejected.

The Court’s assessment of the second element concluded that Aboriginal peoples have always maintained a form of self-government arising from original sovereignty. The Court traced the historic right to self-government, holding that the Act is compatible with the notion of Canadian sovereignty, because the record shows no proof of the extinction of the aboriginal right. Linking the law to child and family services, the Court said that:

“The central purpose of s. 35 is to achieve reconciliation and preserve constitutional space for Indigenous peoples to enable them to live as peoples – with their own identities, cultures and values ​​– within the Canadian framework As a normative system, Indigenous customary law relating to children and the family is part of these values, and the child and the family are the main vehicle for transmitting markers of Indigenous identity. regulation of child and family services by Aboriginal people themselves cannot be divorced from their Aboriginal identity and cultural development” (at para. 48).

The Indigenous right to self-government in child and family services is not distinguished by the federal-provincial division of powers – it extends to all Indigenous peoples because of its importance for cultural continuity and survival.

Deletion of sections 21 and 22(3)

Despite the general constitutionality of the Act, the Court identified problems with Articles 21 and 22(3). Together, the two provisions allowed Indigenous laws developed under coordination agreements to have the same status as federal legislation and the legislative primacy of such laws over provincial legislation. The Court found that it was unconstitutional because it changed the architecture of the Constitution and it was not within the jurisdiction of the federal government to allow Indigenous laws to prevail over conflicting provincial laws. This principle – known as “federal paramountcy” – applies only to validly enacted federal laws.

Furthermore, the federal government did not have the power under the Constitution to give absolute priority to an Aboriginal right under section 35. The constitutional principle of coordinated governments prevents the federal government from legislating over all aspects of provincial relations with Aboriginal peoples. In the future, provincial legislation cannot supersede legislation that an Indigenous governing body has enacted pursuant to its Aboriginal right of self-government over child and family services, unless the regime provincial legislation fails to meet the long-standing section 35 test of impairing impairment and reconciliation.

Without the application of sections 21 and 22(3), there remains no apparent incentive for Aboriginal governing bodies to negotiate or enter into coordination agreements. Indigenous governing bodies may choose to simply notify the federal and provincial governments of their intention to exercise legislative authority over child and family services.

One step forward, two steps back

The Court of Appeal’s decision is riddled with contradictions that run counter to the advancement of Aboriginal self-government. On the one hand, the Court pointed out that the parliamentary intention behind the Act was “clearly intended to break with the past” by providing Aboriginal peoples with the “flexibility and functional independence” to choose their own solutions (at paras. 17 and 18). The decision confirmed that Indigenous communities can create their own legislation to protect and improve the lives of Indigenous children. The Court also noted that the legislative process behind the Act was guided by UNDRIP and that at the international level, UNDRIP affirms the existence of the right to indigenous self-determination. By affirming an Indigenous right to self-government in child and family services, both presently and historically, the Court made its decision consistent with UNDRIP. On the other hand, the Court invalidated the very provisions conferring the primacy and real self-determination, which aligned with the principles of UNDRIP and marked a break with the past.

Reactions to the decision were equally divided. In one joint press releasethe Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador and the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission (“FNQLHSSC“) declared that their First Nations communities will exercise their legislative and inherent right to implement their own child welfare legislation. On January 17, 2022, the Opitciwan Atikamekw Social Protection Act (the Act respecting the social protection of the Atikamekw of Opitciwan) came into force and about fifteen communities will follow in its footsteps. The Chairman of the FNQLHSSC Board of Directors, Derek Montour, stated that they ask the Government of Quebec to actively collaborate with their communities and organizations for an optimal application of Bill C-92 and the adoption of Indigenous laws. . It is likely that a negotiated approach to the implementation of Indigenous child welfare laws will be the best approach to ensuring the well-being of Indigenous children.

Where does that leave aboriginal self-government? A decision rendered on appeal from outside the province is, at best, persuasive to British Columbia courts. It is also likely that an application for leave to appeal will be made to the Supreme Court of Canada. Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hadju saidthat Ottawa is committed to upholding its Indigenous Child Welfare Act and will work to ensure autonomy for First Nations people in Indigenous Child Welfare, but time will tell. Stay tuned for future updates on this decision and its treatment.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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Home rule

Lawmakers consider Adams’ speed camera ‘rule of the house’ request

In an effort to reduce traffic and pedestrian deaths, Mayor Eric Adams is asking state lawmakers to give him more power in the placement of red lights and speed cameras throughout the city.

Although his call for changes to criminal justice reforms has received a lot of attention, Mayor Adams’ push for greater autonomy for traffic law enforcement has largely flown under the radar.

“If our streets aren’t safe, our city isn’t safe. Period,” the mayor tweeted last week. “Home Rule empowers the people who know our city best with the tools to keep our streets safe for every New Yorker.”


What do you want to know

  • Among Mayor Adams’ many demands of Albany this year is New York’s ability to run its own speed and red light cameras.
  • Speed ​​camera pilot program expires this year
  • Currently, Albany imposes strict limits on the city’s use of speed cameras and red light cameras.

Advocates say more needs to be done to prevent road deaths.

“Last year was the deadliest year on our streets since the launch of Vision Zero,” said Danny Harris, executive director of advocacy group Transportation Alternatives. “And this year, we are already on the page to have an even more deadly year. Road fatalities have increased by almost 60% compared to the same period last year. New York City is facing an epidemic of road rage in every corner of the city. »

Former Mayor Bill de Blasio launched the “Vision Zero” program to reduce pedestrian accidents. And during his first year in office, Albany implemented the speed camera program that automatically issues speeding tickets in certain school zones.

This pilot program of radars must still be renewed this year. It’s currently limited to 2,000 cameras in 750 school zones across the city. And the cameras turn off completely at night and on weekends.

The red-light camera program has been around for decades, but remains limited to just one percent of the city’s intersections.

Critics of the current program say it’s time for Albany to give the city authority over these programs and the ability to set its own speed limits.

“It makes no sense that Albany has to dictate to New York City how they can enforce their traffic laws, what their speed limits can be, where to put cameras and other enforcement options. This is nonsense,” said State Senator Andrew Gounardes of Brooklyn.

But in some neighborhoods the cameras are very unpopular. Frank Morano, who chairs Community Board 3 in Staten Island, says his board has received many complaints from drivers.

“People don’t like them. And I say that for various reasons. First, it has nothing to do with security. It has everything to do with the city getting revenue,” he said.

Governor Kathy Hochul also supported autonomy, advocates say. They would like to see this done as part of the budget due later this month, but it could also be done as stand-alone legislation outside of the budget process.

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Home rule

Amid rising road deaths, New York officials amplify push for ‘home rule’

A new report showing a disturbing rise in red-light violations and traffic deaths on New York City streets has become the latest ammunition for local lawmakers in their effort to crack down on the city’s traffic control cameras. from Albany. The report, released Friday by street safety advocacy group Transportation Alternatives, shows more road deaths were recorded last month than in February since at least 2008. Red light violations also hit a seven-year high – the trends, according to the group, are directly linked to “the deadly impact of Albany’s control on the streets of New York”.

City lawmakers have for years lamented the state government’s stranglehold on New York City rules and regulations on a range of issues, most recently in a debate over the mayor’s control of schools in the city. Currently, the city must seek permission from the state legislature to install red light cameras and speed cameras. During the final months of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s tenure, he fought for more jurisdiction over traffic control mechanisms, including allowing speed cameras to be turned on 24 hours a day. Mayor Eric Adams also seeks permission to “manage the city’s camera enforcement programs in addition to empowering cities to enforce speed limits on their streets,” he said during testimony on the proposal. Governor Kathy Hochul’s budget statement before the state legislature last month. In response to Friday’s report Adams tweeted: “If our streets aren’t safe, our city isn’t safe. Period. Home Rule empowers the people who know our city best with the tools to keep our streets safe for every New Yorker.

The report contains the latest data showing an alarming spike in road deaths in New York City in 2021. Crashes killed 273 people in 2021, the highest death toll since 2013, according to Transportation Alternatives. Already, 42 people have died in traffic collisions in 2022, a 58% increase from the same time last year. Twenty-three of those deaths were recorded in February alone.

Transportation Alternatives highlighted in its report the correlation between road deaths and disabled speed cameras. In 2020, “nearly 40 percent of victims died in speed camera areas during the hours Albany asks New York City to turn off the cameras,” the report said.

“It shows the importance of designing streets for safety and developing automated enforcement tools that are frankly more effective than using armed police officers,” said Cory Epstein, director of communications for Transportation Alternatives. , at City & State.

New York City Department of Transportation Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez also highlighted the effectiveness of the city’s speed camera program during a city council hearing on Monday, pointing to statistics that show a 72% decrease in speeding violations in areas where speed cameras have been located during business hours since they were installed in 2014. More than 40% of offenders have vehicles registered outside of New York, Rodriguez said. He closed his testimony before the council’s transportation and infrastructure committee by “joining the mayor in calling on the state to empower the city to run our self-enforcement program.”

If the transfer of autonomy is not part of the state budget due April 1, it will have to be taken up by legislation passed later in the session. To include the policy in the state budget, lawmakers would need to determine the parameters of the city’s jurisdiction over red-light cameras before a House’s budget proposals are due at the end of the month.

State Sen. Andrew Gounardes, who has sponsored legislation to expand the city’s school zone speed camera program, said “it seems more likely that it would be something that could happen outside of the budget,” said he told City & State. Gounardes, along with Assemblywoman Deborah Glick, passed a bill that took effect in 2019 to expand the city’s school zone speed camera program. The bill is up for renewal this session, which Gounardes said might not be necessary if autonomy is transferred to the city first.

“I fully support this call,” Gonardes said of the city’s efforts to take control of traffic cameras. “If for whatever reason we are not successful in governing from home, we will certainly have the opportunity to license the successful programs that have already been put in place and expand them, while continuing to advocate more broadly to leave the New York City control its streets.”

Transportation advocates hope Hochul’s vow to work with Adams – after a lingering power struggle between their predecessors – will help them move toward a “self-reliance” deal this year. “She has a different heritage and history in local government, and we think that’s very promising,” Epstein said.

Hochul expressed openness to the idea in a previous interview with City & State in November, when she said, “Why does the state legislature and governor have to weigh in on having a school district in does New York City have speed cameras or not? in school zones? Tell me why this needs to be relegated to a question that becomes political football at the end of a session in terms of extracting promises, concessions. I don’t want to rule that way.

In addition to his call for home rule, Adams also outlined plans to improve crosswalk safety by redesigning 1,000 intersections with “enhanced traffic signals, raised crosswalks and other safety measures.” ‘expanded pedestrian space and visibility,’ he said Jan. 19 in what was his first major announcement of a street safety policy since taking office. The DOT will also build raised crosswalks at 100 intersections, and the NYPD will step up enforcement of non-surrender violations at crosswalks, Adams said.

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Home rule

‘Home Rule’ Rocks Edition – Streetsblog New York City

How many state lawmakers does it take to change a light bulb – er, a speed limit?

Far too many, according to Transportation Alternatives, which argues in a new report that the number should be zero. The report, “‘Home Rule’ Means Safe Streets: The Deadly Impact of Albany’s Control on New York’s Streets” gathers compelling evidence that New Yorkers are dying in traffic violence due to outdated provisions. that allow Albany to restrict the city’s use of crucial street-safety tools.

This is because (as we have repeatedly pointed out in these pages) the legislature will not let the city set its own speed limits or determine the number, location and hours of operation of speed cameras and light cameras. red. It also limits the number of red light cameras and the use of bus lane cameras. Meanwhile, according to TransAlt:

TransAlt wants immediate domestic government and the Legislature to pass the entire eight-bill Accident Victim Rights and Safety Act, so New Yorkers can act quickly to stave off the epidemic of violence road which has made 2021 the deadliest year since the start of Vision Zero. To which we say “Listen, listen!” The Post also covered.

In other news yesterday:

  • How many subway sleepers went to shelters in the first week of Mayor Adams’ crackdown? A total of 22. (NYDN)
  • The subway crime crackdown has resulted in 143 arrests so far. (Brooklyn Eagle)
  • The head of the MTA, for his part, wants the power to ban repeat offenders. (NYDN, amNY)
  • A police chase led to an accident that damaged the facades of two homes on Staten Island. (SILive, plus the Post, following Streetsblog)
  • Brooklyn Paper dwells on the history of the Grand Street Bike Path. U.S. too.
  • Gothamist has made it into the news of LaGuardia’s transit options.
  • Bed-Stuy is appalled by the misogynistic art of this van parked near a school. (Patch)
  • City Limits reported that street vendor ticketing rebounded to pre-pandemic highs (even though enforcement was turned over to the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection) on the same day our Julianne Cuba saw a cop give a ticket to a vendor on the subway at Jackson Heights. Harassment irritated a lotincluding State Senator Jessica Ramos, who tweeted:
  • Finally, RiseNY has dedicated one of its new Times Square exhibits to the 1950s kitchen of Ralph Kramden, the TV sitcom’s most famous city bus driver. (ViaTwitter)

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Self government

The Congress assessed the application of the European Charter of Local Self-Government in Belgium

A delegation from the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities, made up of rapporteurs Matthias Gysin (Switzerland, ILDG) and Magnus Berntsson (Sweden, EPP/CCE) carried out the first part of the monitoring visit to Belgium from 8 to 10 March 2022 to assess the implementation of the European Charter of Local Self-Government from the previous follow-up report passed by Congress in 2014.

The rapporteurs had exchanges of views on the latest developments in the field of local self-government in Belgium with representatives of local authorities and regional parliaments, including certain institutions in Brussels. Meetings were planned with Roger Stevens, First President of the Council of State, with representatives of the Constitutional Court as well as with Marc Bertrand, Mediator of Wallonia and the Wallonia-Brussels Federation, Bart Weekers, Mediator of Flanders, Marlene Hardt , Mediator of the German-speaking Community and with Catherine De Bruecker, Mediator of the Brussels-Capital Region.

Meetings also with Liesbeth Homans, President of the Parliament of Flanders, Rudy Demotte, President of the Wallonia-Brussels Federation/Parliament of the French Community as well as with Philippe Close, Mayor of Brussels, Pierre Rolin, Mayor of Rhode-Saint-Genèse, members of the municipal council of Namur and Wim Dries, mayor of Genk and president of the Association of Flemish towns and municipalities (VVSG).

The Congress delegation also met the members of the Belgian national delegation to the Congress and the Presidents of the Association of the city and municipalities of the Brussels-Capital Region, the Cities and Municipalities of Wallonia (UVCW) and the Walloon provinces (APW).

Belgium ratified the European Charter of Local Self-Government in 2004. Countries that have ratified the Charter are bound by its provisions. The Charter requires the implementation of a minimum set of rights which form the essential basis of local self-government in Europe. The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe ensures that these principles are respected in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe.

Contact:
Stéphanie POIREL, Secretary of the Monitoring Committee
Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe
Telephone: +33 (0)3 90 21 51 84
Email: [email protected]

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Independence activist

Tributes to Scottish independence campaigner and drugs expert Rowdy Yates

TRIBUTE was paid to a drug rehabilitation expert and Yes activist who died of Covid at the age of 71.

Rowdy Yates MBE has drawn on his own experience of heroin addiction to become a respected voice in treatment and recovery over a career spanning over 50 years.

After overcoming drugs in the 1970s, he co-founded the Lifeline Project and became an Honorary Senior Fellow at the University of Stirling’s Faculty of Social Sciences.

The grandfather was also executive director of EWODOR (European Working Group on Drugs Oriented Research) and honorary vice-president of EFTC (European Federation of Therapeutic Communities).

Living near Trinity Gask in Perthshire, he was also an active campaigner for Scottish independence.

Yates earned his childhood nickname through his rambunctious behavior and the popularity of the TV show Rawhide, whose popular character Rowdy (played by Clint Eastwood) shared his surname. He used the nickname throughout his life and died surrounded by his family at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee on Valentine’s Day.

His wife Kathleen, who is supported by sons Sam, Christy and Calum, shared how he spoke on Facetime with his granddaughters from the hospital, managing to joke around with them. The five daughters – Faith, Hope, Grace, Serena and Zoe – helped keep him active in his later life.

The couple met in Manchester, where the Lifeline project was based. “He always shot from the hip,” she says. “He was a very direct person. He just wanted to do his best and the best he could for people whose lives were affected by addiction.

A founding board member of Phoenix Scotland, Yates left Lifeline in 1993 to become director of the Scottish Drugs Training Project (SDTP) at the University of Stirling. It closed in 2001, after which he became a faculty member specializing in addictions teaching and research. He authored over 40 papers on theory and practice and continued to publish after his retirement in 2016 until his death.

A passionate musician, he recorded songs to raise funds for the EFTC and brought his expertise beyond borders. Members of the Addiction Federation and the World Federation of Therapeutic Communities are among those who paid tribute to him.

Yates received an MBE for drug prevention services in 1994. He regularly questioned the effectiveness of drug policies and championed a user-centred health and treatment approach. And he has spoken out against some politicians’ reactions to calls for a new direction, telling the Herald in 2012: “Every time a politician mentions anything about drug law reform, they get instantly the white feather as a conscientious objector to war. drug. It becomes an annoyance. This is not a serious political debate.

His determination to do well continued in the hospital where, prior to his transfer to intensive care, the behavior of another patient caught his attention. The man was disrespecting the nurses, Kathleen explains, and Rowdy told him to “stop treating the nurses like that, stop treating this place like a hotel and show some respect.”

“As Rowdy was moved,” Kathleen says, “the nurse in charge gave him a big hug and said ‘thank you so much for saying that, because we can’t tell’. That’s just the way he was; even though he was very sick, he couldn’t stay without trying to help.

“He was passionate about good addiction services for addicts because everyone deserves a chance to turn their life around.”

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Home rule

Commission members learn about the self-governance process

The Princeton Home Rule Charter Commission hosted a civics lesson session with City Attorney David Overcash who outlined each section of a home rule charter to members.

The commission was due to discuss the first three sections of a draft charter at its meeting on Wednesday, February 16, but postponed discussions until the next meeting due to Overcash’s detailed presentation. Commissioners also received the 2010 copy of a Texas Municipal League handbook to provide them with useful data throughout the process.

Overcash said his role is primarily advisory to the commission and he will advise them and answer any questions along the way, but he does not have the final say on what happens in the draft charter that will be presented to voters. He added that the city charter will always be subject to any state or federal law in the event of a conflict between them and a provision of the charter.

Any provision to the contrary would also be inapplicable, leaving the charter without bite on certain articles. Charters also provide a very general structure for city government, but generally become cumbersome if there are too many powers listed, Overcash said.

“Most charters, almost all of them, are written very broadly, giving as much discretion as they can to councils so that they can exercise the most local self-government powers,” Overcash said. “It’s rather than wielding as much power as the Texas Legislature allows, which is the general approach to law we’re taking right now.”

For the full story, see the February 24 issue of the Princeton Herald.

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Sovereignty

The Congress assesses the application of the European Charter of Local Self-Government in the Czech Republic

A delegation from the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, composed of rapporteurs Viorel Furdui (Republic of Moldova, ILDG) and Jani Kokko (Finland, SOC/G/PD), will carry out a follow-up visit to Prague, Brno , Jilhava and Velký Beranov from 2 to 4 March 2022 to assess the implementation of the European Charter of Local Self-Government in the Czech Republic since the previous monitoring report adopted by the Congress in 2012.

The rapporteurs will exchange views on the latest developments in the field of local and regional self-government in the Czech Republic with Vít Rakušan, Minister of the Interior, Ivan Bartoš, Minister for Regional Development, as well as with representatives of the Ministry of Finance, the Constitutional Court and the Public Defender of Rights.

In Parliament, the delegation will meet Miloš Vystrčil, President of the Senate and Markéta Pekarovà Adamovà, President of the Chamber of Deputies.

Meetings will also be held with the Mayor of Prague and representatives of the municipalities of Jihlava and Velký Beranov, as well as with the Governor of the Central Bohemian Regional Council. The Congress delegation will also meet members of the Czech national delegation to the Congress as well as the presidents of the Association of Regions of the Czech Republic and the Union of Towns and Municipalities of the Czech Republic.

The Czech Republic ratified the European Charter of Local Self-Government in 1999. Countries that have ratified the Charter are bound by its provisions. The Charter requires the implementation of a minimum set of rights which form the essential basis of local self-government in Europe. The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe ensures that these principles are respected in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe.

Contact

Stéphanie POIREL, Secretary of the Monitoring Committee
Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe
Telephone: +33 (0)3 90 21 51 84
Email: [email protected]

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Home rule

Homelessness and the abrogation of autonomy in the nation’s capital

David W. Marshall

Washington, DC is unique in many ways. With the distinction of being the nation’s capital, it functions as both a city and a state. In terms of population, the District of Columbia is larger than the states of Wyoming and Vermont. It has a budget larger than 12 states, pays more federal taxes than 21 states, pays more federal taxes per capita than any state, has a gross domestic product larger than 17 states, has a rating of triple-A bond and is currently running a budget surplus rather than a deficit.

But it’s a city, not a state. Therefore, it is the only city in America where Congress directly oversees the city’s budget and laws through constitutional authority. For years, Congress operated as the only legislative body where the city’s residents had no elected representation. A limited form of self-government was granted when Congress passed the Home Rule Act of 1973, signed into law by then-President Richard Nixon. It allowed DC residents the right to elect their own mayor, council, and nonvoting member of Congress. Washington DC is the only jurisdiction that does not have the power to appoint its own judges. While DC voters don’t have a federal representative on the ballot, the outcome of the 2022 midterm elections could have significant implications for the city’s autonomy, not to mention its quest for federal status. ‘State.

As House Republicans point to the growing number of homicides and homelessness in the capital, as well as the mayor’s COVID-19 policies, some within the ranks of the GOP have expressed a desire to take greater control of the city. Currently, some members of the House would go so far as to see the Home Rule Act of 1973 eliminated if the Republicans succeed in taking control of Congress. Rep. Andrew S. Clyde (R-Ga.), a member of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, which oversees DC affairs, is drafting legislation to return sole control of the city to Congress by repealing the law. Washington DC is a city no different from other urban communities that are experiencing similar increases in crime and homelessness; Republicans who use this to justify reducing DC’s self-government know this.

We see high-cost cities like Los Angeles, Seattle, and San Francisco grappling with this same humanitarian nightmare — it’s not just a DC problem. The political motivations of the GOPs are clear, with DC being a strongly Democratic city, but politically, how will Republicans at the federal level address the growing growth of homelessness and its root causes? The affordable housing shortage is a national crisis that should be addressed as such by federal officials of both political parties. There is no reasonable way to solve the complex homelessness crisis across America without adequately addressing housing shortages and poverty.

Bernie Sanders recently delivered a speech in the Senate suggesting a “unanimous resolution commending the billionaire class” for amassing more wealth during the pandemic even as remaining American citizens have suffered economic losses. This position is not new for him. By now, some people may have fallen deaf to his message, but the senator’s consistent point is not just about economic disparities, but a divide in humanity. His speech illustrates a growing gap in humanity towards others.

There is a gap between how much we care about the less fortunate and how much we don’t, as a society. For many people, homelessness is only a problem because it’s visible and makes them feel uncomfortable – and we know how much being “uncomfortable” can be triggering for some – as they are forced to face this “horror” every day. We have a viable option in Build Back Better (BBB) ​​legislation that includes historic investments in affordable housing.

It represents a critical step in addressing the multi-partisan issue surrounding homeless encampments that we see nationwide. Given that a bill is in place to address the root causes, how can someone in good conscience say they are sincerely concerned about chronic homelessness and yet reject the BBB? Yes, it’s a heavy toll, but not compared to years of doing nothing, spending millions on temporary repairs, having no safe streets or parks, and adopting bad policies out of desperation, not to mention the human toll and suffering.

There are other underlying causes of homelessness that proponents of “law and order” need to consider. Many people who commit criminal offenses do so to survive, but many also have underlying mental health and addiction issues. It is difficult for the chronically homeless to maintain stable housing due to these addictions or mental health issues. In many jurisdictions, the growing rate of homelessness is rapidly outpacing the addiction and mental health services available. And let’s not forget how the human gap is widening due to vested interests and campaign funding from donors who want to ease the requirements for affordable housing. Many real estate developers prefer to build more profitable and more expensive housing, thereby increasing their supply while reducing affordable housing options. In many cases, developers receive grants (tax incentives) with the promise of providing public benefits such as jobs, affordable housing and green space. Unfortunately, the community does not always receive the promised benefits.

The national problem of homelessness requires coordinated efforts from local lawmakers on the front lines and those crafting effective federal policies in Washington. A homeless person is unlikely to vote in November, but their fate depends on the outcome. We should keep that in mind when we all vote this year. Unfortunately, the future of DC residents also hinges on the results of home races nationwide.

David W. Marshall is the founder of the faith-based organization TRB: The Reconciled Body and the author of the book God Bless Our Divided America. He can be contacted at www.davidwmarshallauthor.com.

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