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October 2022

Self government

The Messenger – President Zurabishvili opens the conference and talks about the importance of self-government





The Messenger – President Zurabishvili opens the conference and talks about the importance of self-government<br>





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By Liza Mchedlidze

Monday, October 24, 2022




President of Georgia Salome Zourbichvili opened the international conference of the Local Self-Government Platform of Georgia “Effectiveness and Challenges of Local Self-Government in Georgia” and addressed the Polish, American, Canadian guests and Israelis.

“The question of autonomy is one of the crucial questions of our future. If we want democracy, Europeanism and a strong state, we need strong regions – there will not be strong regions and there there will be no strong state, a strong Georgia!” said the President in her speech.

According to him, for the region to be strong, autonomy must be real, put into practice and not remain only as a good legal and strategic framework.

“The question of autonomy is one of the crucial questions for our future. If we want democracy, Europeanism and a strong state, we need strong regions. This is a situation we cannot escape. There will be no strong regions and no strong state, strong Georgia! Greater attention to regions – this has been one of my top priorities since day one, but attention alone is not enough .

For the region to be strong, autonomy must be real, put into practice, and not just a good legal framework and a good strategy. Much has been done in this direction, but above all, the region should be autonomous in practice, the municipality should be autonomous, which requires several preconditions, but if we do not do this, we cannot return to our tradition arrangement .

Georgia was strong when the autonomous units (then it was not called autonomous) were strong and together. This unity, this self-government and their independence is our niche. This arrangement of our state was broken by the Soviet system, it moved us to an ultra-centralized system and thus destroyed what was the foundation of our strength, to which we must return. We have the first guidelines for this: we have adopted the “Autonomy Code”.

However, not everything is done yet; We have adopted a decentralization strategy, which must be implemented in three main directions – everything begins and ends with finance, if there is no new distribution of income, there will also be no of self-government because it will not have the resources to implement its own decisions. We must therefore go further in this direction.

Secondly, there is the issue of the transfer of ownership to local authorities, which is also enshrined in the new code but which is not yet fully implemented, and which is one of the foundations of strength and new opportunities municipalities.

And thirdly, there is the question of the involvement of citizens in the process of decision-making and budget allocation, which is also very important. This practice has already been introduced in several municipalities. In some places on a very small scale, in others a little more seriously, but this still only concerns projects such as squares, sculptures, etc. It is not the full involvement of the citizen in the processes that has become a true partner in self-government. The steps to be taken in this direction require everyone’s involvement. So there is a lot to do,” the president said.

The platform is organized by the Georgia branch of the Solidarity Fund PL (SFPL) and the Association of Financiers of Local Self-Governing Units of Georgia (GFA).

Representatives of Georgia’s Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Infrastructure and Regional Development took part in the event.

Conference participants discussed best strategies for effective management of local issues and international best practices.

The main task of the platform is to assign priority strategies to local self-government bodies in Georgia, which will enable them to better serve their citizens, improve sustainability and better guide the collective vision of self-government local in Georgia. In addition, the platform aims to transfer financial and budgetary POSs to local autonomous units.






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Sovereignty

Georgian President says local self-government is ‘crucial’ for Georgia’s future to be democratic and strong

If Georgia wants democracy, Europeanism and to be a strong state, it needs strong regions. Local self-government is one of the crucial issues for the future of the country, Georgian President Salome Zurabishvili said on Saturday at the international conference on the effectiveness and challenges of local self-government in Georgia.

For the region to be strong, self-government must be real, implemented, and not just a legal framework and a strategy,” Zurabishvili said while addressing guests from Poland, the United States, the Canada and Israel.

The President noted that “a lot” has been done in this direction, including the adoption of the local self-government code and the decentralization strategy which still need to be implemented in three “main” directions – financing, transfer of ownership to local communities and participation. citizens in the decision-making and budget allocation process.

Zurabishvili stressed that Georgia must return to the “foundation” of its force – “strong” autonomous units, which had been “broken” by the Soviet system in the past and had moved the country to an “ultra-centralized” system. . “This unity, this self-government and their independence is our niche,” she added.

The main task of the platform, organized by the Georgia branch of the PL Solidarity Fund and the Association of Local Self-Government Financiers, was to assign priority strategies to the self-governing bodies of Georgia, which would enable them to better serve their citizens, enhance sustainable and better guide the collective vision of local self-government in the country.

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Self government

Self-Government Simulation for Métis Youth

Significant work is underway on the Métis Recognition and Self-Government Agreement by the Métis Nation of Ontario, the Métis Nation of Ontario Youth Council and others to foster self-reliance Métis government.

21 emerging leaders between the ages of 16 and 29 will participate in a hands-on knowledge transfer, skill-building and governance experience to lead the next generation of Métis peoples, Métis governance and Métis self-government. To do this, The Gordon Foundation is partnering with the Métis Nation of Ontario and the Métis Nation of Ontario Youth Council to host a Model Self-Government Event from January 20-22, 2023 in Toronto, Ontario.

The simulation event is an exciting and hands-on learning experience intended for:
• Build a network with experts for future learning and support
• Transfer the knowledge of experienced advisors in an engaging and realistic environment
• Introduce you to Métis governance structures, resolution writing, voting, negotiation and assembly practices
• Develop your interest in Métis self-government and self-government

Throughout the simulation event, experienced advisors will impart their knowledge on how the ORM conducts meetings, how to write resolutions, and how to articulate your views. You will then have the opportunity to put this new knowledge to the test during a simulation of the Annual General Meeting!

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Home rule

Charter of autonomy, question of autonomy before the voters of Monument | Now everything

Support local journalism: As a public service, we have decided to put the 2022 Colorado General Election Guide in front of our paywall so that you can access it for free. Would you like to support our work by subscribing to The Gazette? Your subscription allows us to pursue time-consuming projects, like this voter guide, and other issues that shape our state. You can register here.

After months of drafting and input from community members, Monument Town’s first home government charter will be submitted to voters for adoption on November 8.

Last year, residents of the monument voted to change the city’s form of government from statutory rule to home rule and selected nine citizens to form a commission that would draft its home rule charter. The November ballot wording will ask voters whether this now-finalized charter should pass.

The draft charter outlines how the city would develop local ordinances, collect taxes, make decisions, define zoning, create election laws, obtain court proceedings, create districts to better represent areas of residents, create opportunities for economic development, define roads, issue bonds, and give the city more flexibility to solve local problems without being limited by state requirements.

If passed, Monument would become a self-governing municipality from January 1.

Charter Commission Chairman Steve King said establishing an internal regime is important for growing communities like Monument because it gives them the flexibility to address their own concerns, desires and interests rather than to live under the laws of the state. The city’s website says local autonomy would allow Monument to move forward “strategically” through “more government efficiency, more revenue-generating options, and more control over land use.”

These new revenue-generating options are the biggest benefit of adopting the self-reliance charter, King said.

“We wanted (the government) to be more citizen-centric,” he said. “The biggest benefit to the city itself is that it allows us to collect our own sales tax revenue directly.”

Under the statutory rule, sales tax collection is done by the state, which decides how much revenue Monument is entitled to from the collection, King told The Tribune this month. Because of this, the city risks being “aggrieved” about collecting its fair share of taxes without “any real way to challenge or audit” the state’s accounts.

Being a self-governing municipality would allow the city to collect these taxes directly past the state “middleman”, and other self-governing communities have noticed an increase in their revenue once they have passed self-reliance, King said.

The municipality could also capitalize on hotel and short-term rental traffic by collecting the accommodation tax, which it cannot do under the law.

“It gives us other revenue from outside that doesn’t come from residents (taxes),” King said.

After last year’s elections, the commission “immediately” began meeting once a week for six months, often for hours, and drew on other recently drafted self-governance charters and data from from similar Colorado communities like Castle Pines and Centennial, as well as public input. citizens of Monument.

“We used other charters that were in place; we didn’t reinvent the wheel,” King said. “Then we added language more suited to our community in addition to what we found in other communities.”

The Monument Home Rule charter commission was unaware of any opposition to the issue.

If the measure does not pass, the commission would remain intact and have a second opportunity to put the charter on a future ballot, he said. If it failed a second time, the project would be disbanded and another charter would have to be drafted for possible adoption at a later date.

“We would remain statutory until this point,” King said.

The drafted charter can be read in full on Monument’s website at www.tomgov.com, as well as on the Citizens of Monument for Home Rule Facebook page.

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Home rule

Local restaurant defies DC emergency powers, putting Home Rule under scrutiny | United States and world

A A specialty burger shop and pub in Washington, DC, is suing the city’s health department, alleging it exceeded its authority by closing the restaurant earlier this year after repeated violations of the district’s immunization mandate.

The Big Board filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on Thursday, arguing that the department and city government overstepped by issuing emergency orders earlier this year that required businesses in the district verify the vaccination status of customers before allowing them entry. The restaurant refused to comply with the mandates, leading to heavy fines and a forced closure that lasted several weeks – even after the city’s vaccination mandate expired.

RESTAURANT CLOSED FOR VIOLATION OF CITYWIDE VACCINE MANDATE SUES DC HEALTH DEPARTMENT

“We are asking for a statement that the underlying orders were unlawful. … Yes, the pandemic, according to Biden, is now officially in the rearview mirror, but what will happen the next time there is an emergency? ” Robert Alt, president and CEO of the Buckeye Institute and attorney representing the Big Board in court, told the Washington Examiner. “I think there would be an opportunity here for a DC committee to exercise oversight over what happened in this case.”

The lawsuit takes aim at the city government’s use of the emergency legislation, arguing that it “violated federal law governing the power of the District of Columbia to pass ordinances and other laws” through the DC Home Rule Act. Under the rule, the city is authorized to pass laws through the city council with the caveat that each law is subject to congressional approval, placing the district under congressional control for each of its local mandates.

However, local lawmakers are allowed to pass emergency legislation that is in effect for up to 90 days without congressional approval. Washington lawmakers passed the vaccination mandate for local businesses under this emergency rule, prompting arguments from the Big Board that it violated the Constitution by evading oversight and mocking congressional scrutiny. .

“By piling up emergency acts and orders for two years, the district has evaded congressional scrutiny and closed the courthouse doors to Mr. Flannery and thousands of other DC residents,” said declared Alt. “This Home Rule Act endgame has made a mockery of congressional scrutiny and simultaneously stripped Americans of their constitutional rights and due process.”

The DC Home Rule Act has provided city government with a sense of legislative autonomy since it was passed in 1973. However, the law has come under scrutiny in recent months, with some Republicans suggesting remove the provision altogether — hinting it could be on some lawmakers’ agendas if the GOP wins control of Congress in November.

Representative Andrew Clyde (R-GA) has indicated his intention to propose legislation to eliminate DC Home Rule, bringing the district under Congressional control.

“Mayor Bowser’s decision to impose draconian mandates and shut down Big Board for failing to follow unscientific and unconstitutional rules is a perfect illustration of both how DC Home Rule abuses have gone too far and why Congress must act. quickly to return our capital to America’s people,” Clyde told the Washington Examiner. “I applaud Eric Flannery’s fight against DC Home Rule and Mayor Bowser’s medical tyranny, and I remain committed to repealing the Home Rule Act to prevent the failing leadership of DC Democrats from further encroaching on the freedoms of residents, visitors and small businesses.”

However, it’s unclear whether a ruling in favor of the Big Board would necessarily pave the way for the repeal of Washington’s self-government, legal experts say.

“My sense is that this lawsuit actually has relatively minor implications for DC’s Home Rule powers, the reason being that the challenge is how the district has used emergency powers,” said researcher GianCarlo Canaparo. principal at the Heritage Foundation. “So a win here would essentially mean the DC government abused its emergency powers, but it wouldn’t otherwise undermine the Home Rule Act.”

But it could prompt Congress to consider changing the Home Rule Act to limit some of its power, Canaparo said.

“A victory here forces the court to say that DC abused its emergency powers under the Home Rule Act,” he said. “That’s a good reason for Congress to consider changing the Home Rule Act, perhaps to limit those emergency powers, because DC has shown it can’t be trusted.”

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

It’s unclear whether a bill proposing to limit DC’s autonomy would pass Congress, though it’s likely to be voted down by Democrats. Representative Eleanor Norton, who represents the district in the House, has pledged to fight such efforts.

“Rep. Clyde clearly wants the federal government to take over the management of DC as a colony,” Norton said in a statement earlier this year. “He wants to take away even the limited autonomy that DC’s roughly 700,000 residents, the majority of whom are minorities, have had for the past 50 years and give Congress and, presumably, congressional-appointed trustees or the president , day-to-day control on DC”

Original location: Local restaurant defies DC emergency powers, putting Home Rule under scrutiny

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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Home rule

Local restaurant defies DC emergency powers, putting Home Rule under scrutiny

A A specialty burger shop and pub in Washington, DC, is suing the city’s health department, alleging it exceeded its authority by closing the restaurant earlier this year after repeated violations of the district’s immunization mandate.

The Big Board filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on Thursday, arguing that the department and city government overstepped by issuing emergency orders earlier this year that required businesses in the district to check clients’ vaccination statuses before allowing them entry. The restaurant refused to comply with the mandates, leading to heavy fines and a forced closure that lasted several weeks – even after the city’s vaccination mandate expired.

RESTAURANT CLOSED FOR VIOLATION OF CITYWIDE VACCINE MANDATE SUES DC HEALTH DEPARTMENT

“We are asking for a statement that the underlying orders were unlawful. … Yes, the pandemic, according to Biden, is now officially in the rearview mirror, but what will happen the next time there is an emergency? ” Robert Alt, president and CEO of the Buckeye Institute and attorney representing the Big Board in court, told the Washington Examiner. “I think there would be an opportunity here for a DC committee to exercise oversight over what happened in this case.”

The lawsuit takes aim at the city government’s use of the emergency legislation, arguing that it “violated federal law governing the power of the District of Columbia to pass ordinances and other laws” through the DC Home Rule Act. Under the rule, the city is authorized to pass laws through the city council with the caveat that each law is subject to congressional approval, placing the district under congressional control for each of its local mandates.

However, local lawmakers are allowed to pass emergency legislation that is in effect for up to 90 days without congressional approval. Washington lawmakers passed the vaccination mandate for local businesses under this emergency rule, prompting arguments from the Big Board that it violated the Constitution by evading oversight and mocking congressional scrutiny. .

“By piling up emergency acts and orders for two years, the district has evaded congressional scrutiny and closed the courthouse doors to Mr. Flannery and thousands of other DC residents,” said declared Alt. “This end circumventing the Home Rule Act made a mockery of congressional scrutiny and simultaneously deprived Americans of their constitutional rights and due process.”

The DC Home Rule Act has provided city government with a sense of legislative autonomy since it was passed in 1973. However, the law has come under scrutiny in recent months, with some Republicans suggesting remove the provision altogether — hinting it could be on some lawmakers’ agendas if the GOP wins control of Congress in November.

Representative Andrew Clyde (R-GA) has indicated his intention to propose legislation to eliminate DC Home Rule, bringing the district under Congressional control.

“Mayor Bowser’s decision to impose draconian mandates and shut down Big Board for failing to follow unscientific and unconstitutional rules is a perfect illustration of both how DC Home Rule abuses have gone too far and why Congress must act. quickly to return our capital to America’s people,” Clyde told the Washington Examiner. “I applaud Eric Flannery’s fight against DC Home Rule and Mayor Bowser’s medical tyranny, and I remain committed to repealing the Home Rule Act to prevent the failing leadership of DC Democrats from further encroaching on the freedoms of residents, visitors and small businesses.”

However, it’s unclear whether a ruling in favor of the Big Board would necessarily pave the way for the repeal of Washington’s self-government, legal experts say.

“My sense is that this lawsuit actually has relatively minor implications for DC’s Home Rule powers, the reason being that the challenge is how the district has used emergency powers,” said researcher GianCarlo Canaparo. principal at the Heritage Foundation. “So a win here would essentially mean the DC government abused its emergency powers, but it wouldn’t otherwise undermine the Home Rule Act.”

But it could prompt Congress to consider changing the Home Rule Act to limit some of its power, Canaparo said.

“A victory here forces the court to say that DC abused its emergency powers under the Home Rule Act,” he said. “That’s a good reason for Congress to consider changing the Home Rule Act, perhaps to limit those emergency powers, because DC has shown it can’t be trusted.”

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

It’s unclear whether a bill proposing to limit DC’s autonomy would pass Congress, though it’s likely to be voted down by Democrats. Representative Eleanor Norton, who represents the district in the House, has pledged to fight such efforts.

“Rep. Clyde clearly wants the federal government to take over the management of DC as a colony,” Norton said in a statement earlier this year. “He wants to take away even the limited autonomy that DC’s roughly 700,000 residents, the majority of whom are minorities, have had for the past 50 years and give Congress and, presumably, congressional-appointed trustees or the president , day by day. direct current control »

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Self government

Greg Guma: Decentralization—A Path to Self-Government

This commentary is by Greg Guma, author of “Restless Spirits & Popular Movements: A Vermont History”.

The centralization of our social, economic and political systems has engendered a deep sense of helplessness among the population, a growing alienation in society as a whole, the depersonalization of vital services, an excessive recourse to management techniques and control and a loss of great traditions. — Decentralist League, 1977

Forty-five years ago, a group bringing together the political left and right tried to create a “third way” called the Decentralist League of Vermont. He was summoned by Robert O’Brien, a state senator who had recently lost the Democratic gubernatorial primary, and John McClaughry, a Republican critic of his party’s leadership. Each invited a few allies for a series of meetings to question authority and forge a new political vision.

“We oppose political and economic systems that demand obedience to the dictates of elite groups, while ignoring the abuses of those who operate the controls,” its founding statement said.

Vermont had once been fertile ground for “outside the box” thinking. For starters, it didn’t immediately join the new United States after the Revolutionary War, remaining an independent republic until 1791. Almost half a century later, it was the first American state to be elected an anti-Mason governor, at a time when opposition to elites and secret societies was growing.

Early in its history, Vermont also experienced first-hand another type of challenge to centralized power: cancellation. The general idea is that since the states created the federal government, they also have the right to judge the constitutionality of federal laws — and potentially refuse to enforce them.

This happened when American settlers overturned laws imposed by the British. Since then, states have sometimes used nullification to limit federal actions, from the Fugitive Slave Act to tariffs. In November 1850, the Vermont legislature joined the club, approving a habeas corpus law that required officials to assist slaves arriving in the state.

In recent times, Vermont has become a testing ground for progressive political, economic and environmental thought. But the former urban professionals and members of the counterculture who arrived to help make it possible built on a solid foundation. The questioning of illegitimate and centralized power began before the American Revolution. This continued with the re-election to Congress from prison of Matthew Lyon in defiance of President Adams, the resistance to a British embargo and the War of 1812, and the defeat of the Green Mountain Parkway in the New Deal. .

The model reflects a libertarian streak that resisted the excesses of both liberal and conservative leaders.

In a similar spirit, the group of Vermonters who launched an alliance in 1976 aimed to decentralize political and economic power. Invited by Bob O’Brien, I acted as secretary and helped write his statement of principles. The Decentralist League was officially launched in Montpellier in March 1977. The plan was not to become another political party, according to the press, but rather to “defend the interests of people not protected by rigged agreements”.

Founding members included McClaughry and Senator O’Brien; Senator Melvin Mandigo, a Republican representing Essex-Orléans; Representative William Hunter, a Democrat from Weathersfield; John Welch, who sought the GOP nomination in 1976 in the US Senate; and Frank Bryan, professor at UVM.

I also made the list, identified as a magazine editor and activist, joining former Democratic Party Vice President Margaret Lucenti; James Perkins of Sheffield, co-chair of the Vermont Caucus for the Family; William Staats of Newfane, founder of the Green Mountain Boys; Martin Harris of Sudbury, head of the National Farmers Organization; and John Schnebley Jr., who ran in the 1976 Democratic primary for the U.S. House.

As I pointed out in a July 1976 essay published in response to the United States Bicentennial celebrations, decentralization involves participatory democracy and worker ownership, self-government and neighborhood assemblies, regional self-sufficiency in food and energy and voluntary inter-community alliances. Through efforts at both the industrial and local political levels, it can move us toward a libertarian social culture that respects the traditions of freedom and independence of the American past, and adds to that heritage a positive view of human nature, ethical and ecological tools, and an internationalist perspective.

The fundamental purpose of the League, McClaughry explained, was to “shift the political spectrum so that people begin to see the issues in terms of widely dispersed power (near them in communities) and centralized power (in large large institutions over which they have no influence).control).”

Although it only lasted a few years – a victim of Reagan-era polarization – the League has identified a core set of beliefs, priorities and policies that could unite those who find the current national and global order unsustainable and dangerous. In Burlington, a legacy has been the creation of neighborhood planning assemblies.

Aiming for the centralization of power and wealth, the League asserted that decentralizing both, where and whenever possible, is the best way to preserve diversity, increase self-sufficiency, and meet human needs.

Its basic principles, published in March 1977, resonate anew in today’s global atmosphere of resurgent authoritarianism. Some specifics of the policy may seem outdated; others are more relevant than ever.

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Tags: Decentralist League, Greg Guma, outside the box, third way

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Recent Stories


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Independence activist

Meet the independence and socialist activist who called for “total revolution”

Jayapraksh Narayan is commonly referred to as JP and Lok Nayak for his activities and action against the government led by Indira Gandhi in the mid-1970s, for whose overthrow he called for ‘Sampoorna Kranti’ or ‘Total Revolution’. He was a socialist, an independence activist and a mass leader. He has received several awards for his contributions to the country, including the Magsaysay Award and the Bharat Ratna Award.

Born on October 11, 1902 in Ballia district of Bihar, he was the fourth child of Phul Rani Devi (mother) and Harsu Dayal (father). He left his village at the age of nine to enroll in seventh grade at a school in Patna. He stayed in a student hostel where he made several friends (Krishna Singh, former CM of Bihar), Anugrah Narayan Sinha (first Deputy CM of Bihar), and others who later gained popularity in the politics and academics.

He continued his studies in the United States at Berkeley in the 1920s. He picked grapes and packed fruit to pay for his studies and support himself. During the same period, he gained first-hand experience of working-class life. He returned to India in 1929 and joined the Indian National Congress under the mentorship of Mahatama Gandhi.

Activism during independence

He gained initial fame during the Quit India movement and civil disobedience, where he was imprisoned for protesting against British rule. He founded the Socialist Congress Party (CSP) after being released from prison. He took an important step in 1974 when he brought to the fore problems such as unemployment, inflation and lack of supply of goods and raw materials.

He organized roadside rallies with the youth of Bihar, and the government tried hard to stop the unrest. He said, “This is a revolution, my friends! We are not here just to see the Vidhan Sabha dissolved; this is just one milestone on our journey. But we have a long way to go. After 27 years of freedom, the people of this country are ravaged by hunger, rising prices, corruption…oppressed by all kinds of injustice…it’s total revolution we want, nothing less,” said Wikipedia.

Call for “total revolution”

It was at this time that Lok Nayak called for a peaceful “total revolution”. Shortly after, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was found guilty by the High Court in Allahabad of violating election laws. He seized the opportunity and demanded the resignation of the Chief Minister and Indira. He led various programs under the slogan “Total Revolution” against the government. Immediately afterwards, Gandhi declared a state of emergency on June 25, 1975. Many leaders of his party were detained and arrested by state police.

Narayan drew over a million people to Ramlila Ground in New Delhi and recited “Singhasan Khaali Karo Ke Janata Aaati Hai”, a famous line from Ramdhari Singh Dinkar. He was widely known as the mass leader who showed the country that young people wanted jobs, development and dedication to good governance from the government instead of responding to ideological motives.

Also read: Provide shelter for the homeless! Once abandoned by her parents, this Keralite welcomes the elderly with an open heart

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Self government

Canada and Anishinabek First Nations Commemorate Historic Milestone of Self-Government Agreement

Canada and the Anishinabek First Nations commemorate a historic milestone with an in-person ceremony to celebrate the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement, which entered into force today. From left to right: Reg Niganobe, Chief of the Grand Council of the Anishinabek Nation, the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Gimaa Kwe Rhonda Williams-Lovett of the Moose Deer Point First Nation, Chief Lloyd Myke of the Magnetawan First Nation, Deputy Chief Michael Sawyer of Nipissing First Nation, Chief Irene Kells of Zhiibaahaasing First Nation and Chief Larry Roque of Wahnapitae First Nation. – Photo by Ryan Peplinskie

ANISHINABEK NATION HEADQUARTERS (October 1, 2022) — Today, the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, joined Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Reg Niganobe, Magnetawan First Nation Chief Lloyd Myke at Gimaa Kwe Rhonda Williams-Lovett of Moose Deer Point First Nation, Chief Scott McLeod of Nipissing First Nation, Chief Larry Roque of Wahnapitae First Nation and Chief Irene Kells of Zhiibaahaasing First Nation during an in-person ceremony to celebrate the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement, which entered into force today. This celebration is an opportunity for the parties to commemorate the signing of the Agreement, which took place in a virtual ceremony earlier this year.

The Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement is the first self-government agreement of its kind in Ontario. It marks an important step for the signatory Anishinabek First Nations, since the parties of the Indian Act regarding governance will no longer apply.

Obtained after approximately 25 years of negotiations, this historic agreement recognizes Anishinabek control over the governance and law-making powers of signatory First Nations in key areas. First Nations will make their own decisions about how their elections will be held, who their citizens are and how their governments will operate, and how best to protect and promote Anishinaabe language and culture.

The Government of Canada is working with its First Nations partners to restore respectful nation-to-nation relationships, recognize their inherent right to self-determination, and support communities as they emerge from the grip Indian Act and the transition to self-government.

Quotation

“I am honored to take part in today’s celebration with leaders, Elders, youth and members of the Anishinabek community to mark this important milestone in the implementation of the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement. This is an important step away from the Indian Act for the signatory Anishinabek First Nations to implement their right to self-determination and their visions of a better future for their communities. – The Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“Today marks an important milestone in the implementation of the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement Act. We are honored to be here with the B’Maakonigan communities and the Honorable Marc Miller to commemorate this unprecedented occasion. We share the collective enthusiasm for the vast potential this new agreement will create for these signatory communities. – Grand Council Chief Reg Niganobe, Anishinabek Nation

“Our community at Moose Deer Point First Nation is excited about the implementation of the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement Act. Our self-determination to govern in our own way and to have Canada respect our sovereignty is a positive step towards meaningful reconciliation. – Gimaa Kwe Rhonda Williams-Lovett, Moose Deer Point First Nation

“We express our appreciation for this next step towards the implementation of the Agreement. We will be able to provide our citizens with approaches and efficiencies in resource distribution that we were unable to provide before and serve our community as we always intended. – Chief Larry Roque, Wahnapitae First Nation

“As our nations strive to reclaim our rightful jurisdictions over our own governance, the Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement provides us with a tool to opt out of sections of the Indian Act, enabling us to govern and protect our elections, language and culture, citizenship, management and operations. It is a positive step towards self-government. – Chief Scott McLeod, Nipissing First Nation

“Magnetawan Anishinabek governance is the next step in exercising our inherent right to govern ourselves and to position our community and our members in the creation of our supreme laws. – Chief Lloyd Myke, Magnetawan First Nation

“This deal is one for our history books. This will help us build new relationships within our community. We need to keep the Anishinaabemowin alive to connect with our environment and be proud of who we are. – Chief Irene Kells, Zhiibaahaasing First Nation

Fast facts

  • Self-government negotiations with the Anishinabek Nation on governance began in 1995, resulted in an agreement-in-principle in 2007 and concluded in 2019.
  • Over the past two years, the Agreement has been approved by the citizens of each signatory First Nation through a community vote.
  • This follows extensive community outreach during this period as well as engagement with Anishinabek citizens during negotiations.
  • The agreement was signed by the parties in April 2022 and federal legislation to bring the agreement into force received Royal Assent on June 23, 2022. The effective date of the agreement is October 1, 2022 .
  • As a next step, the signatory First Nations (which make up the Anishinabek Nation government) will pass their own laws to create and manage their new system of governance.
  • This work will be supported by increased funding to First Nations to fulfill their new responsibilities and invest in community priorities for a better future.
  • In April 2022, the signatory First Nations determined the new name of the central governing body, B’Maakonigan (Anishinabek Nation Government).
  • This is not the first self-government agreement negotiated with the Anishinabek Nation. In 2018, the parties reached an education self-government agreement that is now in effect for 23 Anishinabek First Nations in Ontario.

Related links

About Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement

Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement

Anishinabek Nation

Self-government (in Canada)

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For further information, media may contact:

Renelle Arsenault
Communications Director
Office of the Honorable Marc Miller
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations
[email protected]

Media Relations
Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
819-934-2302
[email protected]

Laura Barrios
Communications Coordinator
Anishinabek Nation
705-498-1957
[email protected]

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