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June 2022

Self government

In West Virginia v. EPA, Supreme Court rules in favor of self-government

It’s been a hectic month for Supreme Court rulings. Monumental rulings on life issues, the Second Amendment and religious liberty have now been followed by West Virginia vs. EPAa move that has major implications for vetting runaway regulators and for the economy.

In short, the Supreme Court close the ability of the Environmental Protection Agency to completely revamp Americans’ electricity sources around a sweeping climate agenda based on the agency’s broad interpretation of a narrow Clean Air Act provision.

In doing so, the Supreme Court made it harder for other regulators to get away with similar power grabs.

To appreciate the implications of this decision, first consider the things you did this morning to prepare for the day. Your phone or clock alarm has gone off. The shower was just the right temperature. Your coffee was hot and the cream was cold. Your clothes are more likely to match due to a well-lit room. And you may have turned on a computer to start the work day, all because of electricity.

Americans are extremely lucky to often take everything that happens behind the scenes for granted when they plug something into an outlet. Whether you think about it or not, energy is essential to health, well-being and Economic opportunityand he was a driver in the dramatic decrease mortality and extreme poverty over the last century.

This potential for productivity and growth of individuals, families, businesses, communities and entire economies is why energy policy matters and why high energy prices matter. corrosive.

Now imagine if a single federal agency of unelected bureaucrats had a determining influence on the composition of the electricity sector. This agency would not only influence the power plants, but the economy. This was the occasion for the Supreme Court hearing in West Virginia v. EPA.

The case

At stake in this case was the so-called Clean Energy Plan and its power to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from the entire electricity sector. The Clean Power Plan established mandates to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and a cap-and-trade system designed to shut down coal and natural gas plants in favor of renewables.

Almost 60% of Americans’ electricity today comes from natural gas and coal-fired power plants, which emit greenhouse gases.

In other words, the EPA has put itself squarely in the position of setting energy and economic policy under the guise of environmental policy while enjoying near absolute power to do so.

One of the plan’s many consequences was that the EPA completely ignored important considerations, such as network reliability, affordability, consumer choice, and state responsibilities. Instead, the EPA’s sole interest was to regulate the grid to achieve then-President Barack Obama’s radical climate agenda of demanding a transition from conventional energy to politically correct renewable energy.

If the court on Thursday upheld near-unlimited authority for the EPA to regulate the network, EPA Biden was set to follow up with its own version as the centerpiece of President Joe Biden’s unilateral commitment to the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Heritage Foundation modeling estimates trillions of dollars in damage to the entire economy and to American families, and with no environmental benefit, whether as a result of the of the Obama administration Clean Power Plan or a possible Biden version. (The Daily Signal is the medium of the Heritage Foundation.)

In this sense, the court’s 6 to 3 decision in West Virginia v. EPA is very good news for electricity consumers across the country, who are now protected against the EPA’s unlimited and inexplicable interference in their electricity bills.

The overview

However, in many ways, protecting against these consequences is an important but secondary issue to whether Congress even gave the EPA the power to do so.

The court correctly determined that the EPA has gone well beyond its role by creating for itself an authority to regulate the electricity sector, and with it a major component of the bedrock of the American economy.

In other words, how the EPA tried to regulate greenhouse gas emissions mattered a lot.

That’s why people on both sides of the aisle and of opposing beliefs about global warming have opposed the EPA’s regulatory attempts.

When the Obama administration first released the Clean Power Plan, Laurence Tribe – Obama’s former law professor at Harvard –eloquently describes the deep issues with the rule:

At its core, the question the Clean Power Plan asks is whether the EPA is bound by the rule of law and must operate within the framework established by the United States Constitution. …

Accordingly, the EPA gamble would mean that citizens give up their right to be represented by an accountable and responsive government that accords with the assumptions of federalism.

The tribe called it a “sleight of hand [that] offends democratic principles by avoiding political transparency and accountability.

What West Virginia v. EPA reminds us is that America is not run by an irresponsible king in the White House and his regulatory officials, but rather by elected American officials in partnership with the states.

This expressed will is simply implemented by the executive power, and not the other way around.

Do you have an opinion on this article ? To chime in, please email [email protected] and we’ll consider posting your edited remarks in our regular “We Hear You” column. Don’t forget to include the URL or title of the article as well as your name and city and/or state.

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Self government

OPINION: Juneteenth should reinforce that we are all capable of self-government

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. Source: Library of Congress

By Ray Nothstine
Carolina Journal Opinion Editor

Slavery in the United States ended in practice at the end of the Civil War. We can find the ideals of equality in our Declaration of Independence, which says, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator…” Indeed, Christian influence and revivals in America have strongly reinforced the idea that we are all made in the image of God, creating a culture ripe for fuller freedoms and emancipation.

Yet America has often struggled to put into practice this simple truth contained in our Declaration. The rise of the American civil rights movement has helped raise awareness to live up to our founding ideals. Civil rights leaders frequently borrowed founding words and documents because they possessed great recognition and authority with the public – especially given that they wanted to persuade white households. The “Let Liberty Ring” repetition of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is a clear reference to the Liberty Bell.

Fortunately, just as the civil rights movement drew inspiration from its founders, we can learn from one of most significant moral movements. The obvious lesson is equality before the law and human dignity, but the idea of ​​autonomy or self-government follows directly from this. Our founding documents give us the principles and the dignity of self-government. Unfortunately, unlike any other era in our past, many Americans are struggling to fully embrace self-government.

The American Civil Rights Movement, often referred to as the Second American Revolution, faced entrenched prejudices and the idea that some were basically meant to be serfs.

African Americans demanded change, and many of those changes were to be fully integrated into the day-to-day practice of self-government, including the right to vote where previously prohibited in large pockets of the South, and to end segregation and discrimination based on race. .

It was highly divisive as the movement publicly challenged traditions and laws, but supported through peaceful protests and the art of nonviolence. One of the striking characteristics of the movement is raw courage. An anecdote from the Reverend Fred Shuttleworth, the hero of the Birmingham campaign, provides an excellent example. Reprinted in 2011 New York Times obituary are these words about Shuttlesworth:

In one instance, on Christmas Eve 1956, he survived an attack in which six sticks of dynamite exploded outside his parsonage bedroom as he lay in bed. “The wall and floor were blown away,” Ms. McWhorter wrote, “and the mattress was lifted into the air, supporting Shuttlesworth like a magic carpet.”

When he attempted to enroll his children in an all-white school in 1957, Klansmen attacked him with bicycle chains and brass knuckles. When a doctor treating his head injuries marveled that he had not suffered a concussion, Mr Shuttlesworth famously replied: “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a tough city, so he gave me a hard head.”

The most important aspect of the civil rights movement is that it helped to awaken a deeper moral culture in America. The federal government could no longer ignore discrimination, especially during the Cold War era when the nation’s image and credibility came under increasing scrutiny. Yet ultimately, the change in racial discrimination had to come from the heart of the human person.

The ordained calls for justice and freedom – backed by the moral authority of foundation and scripture – are being met today with the mounting violence and chaos we see in the news too often centered on ideological objectives and not on first principles. If we are to improve our experience of self-government, these are the kinds of ideals we must embrace: virtue, order, respect for the rule of law, and a peaceful transition of power. Like the civil rights movement, we must be grounded in higher truths.

While America has faltered at many times due to racism and internal violence, we are still the greatest country on earth that has expanded freedom more than any other nation in history. Helping to reclaim these truths – including the Juneteenth Principles – can make us a nation where self-reliance not only endures but thrives.

Ray Nothstine is an editor of the Carolina Journal and a Second Amendment fellow at the John Locke Foundation.

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Sovereignty

Royal Assent for the Anishinabek Nation Self-Government Act

The Anishinabek Nation Governance Agreement is now in effect.

Bill S-10, the first self-government agreement of its kind in Ontario, received Royal Assent in Parliament on June 23, 2022.

Officials say the legislation will build on the work of the Anishinabek Nation to help them achieve their inspiring vision of a better future for their communities.

“We are pleased to see that Parliament unanimously supports our governance aspirations,” said Chief Scott McLeod of Nipissing First Nation. “He recognizes that we have the right and the ability to decide important issues ourselves, like who our people are. This is just another step on our journey to full autonomy.

Ottawa says the agreement represents another important step in renewing relationships, closing socio-economic gaps and promoting greater prosperity now and in the future.

“Canada continues to work to renew nation-to-nation relationships and advance self-determination, with Indigenous partners like the Anishinabek Nation,” said Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations. “We will continue to support agreements created by Indigenous communities, for Indigenous communities, so they can achieve their own visions of success.

The agreement, which was signed in April 2022, recognizes Anishinabek control over their governments and law-making powers in four key areas:

  • direction selection
  • citizenship
  • language and culture
  • government operations

The Nipissing First Nation was one of the signatory first nations.

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Home rule

There’s No Place Like Home (RULE) – Sedona.Biz


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By Tommy Acosta

Sigh. How many times do I have to repeat myself? house rulerules!

No one wants to hear the phrase No welcome rule for that implies that one has no right to govern one’s house.

It sits in the unconscious and disrupts the concept of one’s ability to rule the home.

And then there is the word “imposed” as in State-Imposed Limitation of Expenditure (SIEL).

Who the hell wants the state to impose anything on our city? Besides, who wants someone to impose anything on them, period!

To impose means “to force (something unwelcome or unknown) to be accepted or put in place”.

And the synonyms are even worse: impose, force, push, inflict, obstruct, press, incite.

The concept is unpleasant for any lover of freedom.

Yes, SIEL removes council’s right to self-approve expenditures and eliminates local control over expenditures not addressed in the budget, requiring citizens to vote to approve additional expenditures.

But then what?

SEIL is cumbersome, expensive and requires the board to spend money in a timely manner should it become necessary.

SIEL supporters believe the City is spending money frivolously and hope to limit the city’s ability to make its own budget decisions by eliminating its right to do so within state-imposed limitations, forcing the advice to put all uncovered additional expenses in the budget for public vote, even if the public does not vote on the city budget themselves…a waste of time and money.

They say it’s necessary to control the council and win back the citizens’ vote, but they forget that they don’t have a vote on the main budget either. They never had that right in the first place. It’s like trying to close the barn door after the horse has excreted.

Even if the promoters are right on the advice, the vernacular of No welcome rule denies them.

The key is to elect board members who reflect the will of the people and trust them to do the right thing. Period. No need to give up local control over our money.

No welcome rule rubs against the grain of freedom like metallic chalk on a glass blackboard while the term house rule creates all sorts of fuzzy feelings when you say it or think about it.

Ah! house rule. Isn’t it nice? The sweetness of the hearth. My house is my castle. Nothing beats the house and all that jazz.

SEIL supporters set to lose as voters huddle against house rule once again.

In the opinion of SEIL supporters, the council is populated by individuals who push small, selfish projects and keep the wool in the public eye.

Maybe in Washington but not here in Sedona. I can’t imagine any of our board members taking advantage of their position.

Throw the term “State-imposed Limit spending” in your head. The word imposed should offend any self-respecting Republican or Conservative the wrong way.

Imposed? Please. The state should not have the power to impose anything on our right of local control over our budget.

Even Democrats and Liberals would find the term repugnant. Ugh!

The effort to impose the state-imposed spending cap on the people of Sedona will fail miserably, just as it has before.

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Sovereignty

Canada and Shíshálh Nation Mark Royal Assent of Historic Self-Government Legislation

OTTAWA, ON, June 24, 2022 /CNW/ – The Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, and hiwus Warren Paul of the shíshálh nation, announced that Bill S-10, which modernizes from Canada recognition of self-government for the Shishalh Nation, received Royal Assent in Parliament on June 23, 2022.

This legislation, both symbolically and concretely, transforms the relationship between Canada and the shishalh nation. The bill updates the 1986 law, removing the anglicized name and changing to Shíshálh Nation Self-Government Act.

Other changes include:

  • Harmonize the Self-Government Act with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,
  • remove antiquated oversight provisions that are not required under modern self-government agreements,
  • affirming legislative powers over social and welfare services, including child and family services for all members of the Shíshálh Nation, and
  • allowing the establishment of a new land registry for the registration of interests in shíshálh lands, as an alternative to the Indian Act Reserve land register.

Canada is committed to working with Indigenous partners to implement their inherent right to self-determination and support their visions of a better future for their communities.

This legislation will build on the work of the Shíshálh Nation to help them achieve their inspiring visions of a better future for their citizens. This represents another important step in renewing our nation-to-nation relationship and the self-determination of the shishalh nation.

Quotation

“I want to acknowledge that this legislation is the result of years of work by the shíshálh nation and commend them for the results of their perseverance and hard work. With these amendments, Canada take positive steps to support the self-determination of the shíshálh nation.”

The Honorable Marc Miller
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations

“This is an important day in the history of our nation. The changes to the law are helping to reset our nation-to-nation relationship and seek further reconciliation. Shishalh has been a leader for many decades. We let’s continue to show how Indigenous self-determination can dramatically improve the lives of Nation members while promoting economic growth in the greater community.”

Hi Warren Paul of the shishalh nation

Fast facts

  • In 1986, the shíshálh nation became the first indigenous nation Canada achieve self-government under the Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act.
  • For three years, Canada also worked with the shíshálh nation on amendments to their self-government law.

Related links

Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act (SC 1986, c. 27)

Canada and Anishinabek First Nations sign historic self-government agreement

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SOURCE Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada

For further information: Media may contact: Justine Leblanc, Press Secretary, Office of the Honorable Marc Miller, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Email: [email protected]; CIRNAC Media Relations: Email: [email protected]Phone: 819-934-2302

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Home rule

DC Elected Its Own Mayors Under Home Rule Before Congress Intervened

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Tuesday’s primary elections in DC mark nearly half a century since Congress extended home rule to the district in 1973. But there was an earlier, mostly forgotten chapter when local residents — some of between them, at least – voted in local elections until Congress shot them. immediately in the 1870s.

In 1820, Congress amended the DC charter to allow white men who owned property to vote for mayor, and it lifted the property requirement in 1848. As a young congressman, Abraham Lincoln drafted a bill to end slavery in the district, but in an early nod to self-rule, he made the legislation conditional on gaining the approval of a majority of white male residents. (Women did not gain the right to vote until the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920.)

DC’s election is a status quo referendum against the Liberal reshuffle

The beginning of the end of the district’s home rule probably came in 1867, when Congress made it significantly more democratic by extending the vote to black men in Washington. President Andrew Johnson, an opponent of black enfranchisement, vetoed the bill, but both houses of Congress overrode it by wide margins at the height of Reconstruction. As Sen. Charles Sumner (R-Mass.) hopefully said, DC was to be “an example for the whole country, and especially for the South.”

Testifying in favor of a DC state bill before the US House Oversight Committee last year, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) described the local government that followed the Black Emancipation as a Brief Success Story:

The city’s biracial government desegregated city bureaucracy, provided jobs for a burgeoning black middle class, implemented massive public works projects, and supported the expansion of what became the best black public school system. from the country. Yet that very success sparked a backlash from white conservatives and business leaders who persuaded Congress to back out of biracial democracy.

After the Civil War ended in 1865, radical Republicans in Congress pushed through civil rights measures, including the 14th Amendment, which granted citizenship to former slaves, and the 15th Amendment, which granted black men citizenship. right to vote – three years after the extension of this right. direct current

When Matthew Gault Emery, the city’s last mayor of this period, took office in 1870, he inherited a government that had accumulated large debts. While criticizing the extravagant spending of his predecessors, Emery announced that more spending would be needed to deal with debt and fund public works projects. He built schools and cleared the streets of pigs, goats and geese.

The interracial romance that stunned Washington – twice! — in 1867

At the time, Congress was seeking to undermine the domestic regime, including a proposal to make the city a territory, which Emery, unsurprisingly, opposed.

“If the people of the district are not able to govern themselves, the people’s government will be seen as a failure in the national capital. I am not ready to make such an admission,” Emery said. Congress voted for the proposal anyway, and in 1871 President Ulysses S. Grant signed the bill into law.

The resulting hybrid form of government significantly eroded local control, with the president appointing a new governor and legislative council, while residents could vote for members of a new House of Delegates and for a delegate without the right to vote. vote in the United States House. But it didn’t last long: Congress abolished this system in 1874 after a congressional investigation found cost overruns, untendered contracts, and other problems under the head of the Board of Works. public appointed by the president, Alexander Shepherd.

“Alexander ‘Boss’ Shepherd’s massive public works projects had bankrupted Washington’s short-lived territorial government elected by black and white voters,” wrote Harry Jaffe and Tom Sherwood in their 1994 book, “Dream City : Race, Power, and the Decline”. from Washington, D.C. »

In its place, Congress proposed a temporary plan for the city to be run by three commissioners appointed by the president.

The Nation, a magazine founded by abolitionists in 1865, condemned the abolition of home rule, writing: “Under this bill there remains no vestige of popular municipal administration: aldermen, town councillors, mayors , boards of directors, school boards, police boards, primaries, conventions, everything is swept away, and the whole government is handed over to three men, appointed by a foreign authority, responsible not to their fellow citizens, but to the president and the president. Senate.

In 1878, Congress—which was now divided after the Southern Democrats returned—made this system permanent.

Haiti paid reparations to slavers. Just like Washington, D.C.

“The men of the district, white and black, rich and poor, lost their right to vote. They wouldn’t have cast another meaningful vote for a century,” wrote Chris Myers Asch and George Derek Musgrove in their 2017 book, “Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital.”

If there was any doubt about the role race played in the denial of autonomy less than a decade after black men won the vote, a U.S. senator from Alabama and former Confederate general named John Tyler Morgan made the link explicit. In the Senate in 1890, he compared Congress’s decision to abolish self-government in DC to the slaughter of animals in Kansas to prevent the spread of disease affecting livestock.

Sen. John Ingalls (R-Kan.) continued the metaphor: “Burn down the barn to get rid of the rats.

“Yes, burning the barn to get rid of the rats,” Morgan replied, explaining, “The rats being the black people and the barn being the government of the District of Columbia.”

Morgan, a plantation owner, said that after black people “flooded” into Washington, Congress had no choice but to strip the vote of everyone in DC:

Faced with this influx of black people from surrounding states, the Senate and House of Representatives, in order to preserve property rights and administrative decency in the central government of the United States here around the very walls of the Capitol, have deemed it necessary to disenfranchise every man in the District of Columbia, whatever may have been his reputation or character or property holdings, in order thus to get rid of that charge of black suffrage which has been inundated upon them.

Nearly 70 years later, DC residents won the right to vote in presidential elections after the 23rd Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1961. But it wasn’t until Christmas Eve in 1973 that President Richard M. Nixon – plagued by the Watergate scandal – signed a law giving DC the power of the house that Washingtonians could vote for leaders in their own city.

“As the nation approaches the 200th anniversary of its founding, it is especially appropriate to assure those who live in our capital city the rights and privileges long enjoyed by most of their countrymen,” Nixon said in a statement.

The president said he voted for a self-government bill as a congressman in 1948 and called himself a “longtime supporter of self-government for the District of Columbia,” although a Washington Post article at the time said the White House had not actively lobbied for the bill.

The following year, the city’s president-appointed mayor, Walter E. Washington, became DC’s first modern elected mayor. He was sworn in on January 2, 1975, by Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

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Self government

Juneteenth should reinforce that we are all capable of self-government

Slavery in the United States ended in practice at the end of the Civil War. We can find the ideals of equality in our Declaration of Independence, who said, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, they are endowed by their Creator…” Indeed, Christian influence and revivals in America have strongly reinforced the idea that we are all created in the image of God, creating a culture ripe for fuller freedoms and emancipation.

Yet America has often struggled to put into practice this simple truth contained in our Declaration. The rise of the American civil rights movement has helped raise awareness to live up to our founding ideals. Civil rights leaders frequently borrowed founding words and documents because they possessed great recognition and authority with the public – especially given that they wanted to persuade white households. The “Let Liberty Ring” repetition of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech is a clear reference to the Liberty Bell.

Fortunately, just as the civil rights movement draws inspiration from the founders, we can learn from one of America’s most important moral movements. The obvious lesson is equality before the law and human dignity, but the idea of ​​autonomy or self-government follows directly from this. Our founding documents give us the principles and the dignity of self-government. Unfortunately, unlike any other era in our past, many Americans are struggling to fully embrace self-government.

The American civil rights movement, often referred to as the second American revolution, came up against entrenched prejudices and the idea that some were essentially destined to be serfs.

African Americans demanded change, and many of those changes were to be fully integrated into the day-to-day practice of self-government, including the right to vote where previously prohibited in large pockets of the South, and to end segregation and discrimination based on race. .

It was highly divisive as the movement publicly challenged traditions and laws, but supported through peaceful protests and the art of nonviolence. One of the striking characteristics of the movement is raw courage. An anecdote from the Reverend Fred Shuttleworth, the hero of the Birmingham campaign, provides an excellent example. Reprinted in 2011 New York Times obituary are these words about Shuttlesworth:

In one instance, on Christmas Eve 1956, he survived an attack in which six sticks of dynamite exploded outside his parsonage bedroom as he lay in bed. “The wall and floor were blown away,” Ms. McWhorter wrote, “and the mattress was lifted into the air, supporting Shuttlesworth like a magic carpet.”

When he attempted to enroll his children in an all-white school in 1957, Klansmen attacked him with bicycle chains and brass knuckles. When a doctor treating his head injuries marveled that he hadn’t suffered a concussion, Mr Shuttlesworth famously replied: “Doctor, the Lord knew I lived in a tough city, so he gave me a hard head.”

The most important aspect of the civil rights movement is that it helped to awaken a deeper moral culture in America. The federal government could no longer ignore discrimination, especially during the Cold War era, when the nation’s image and credibility came under increasing scrutiny. Yet ultimately, the change in racial discrimination had to come from the heart of the human person.

The ordained calls for justice and freedom – backed by the moral authority of foundation and scripture – are being met today with the mounting violence and chaos we see in the news too often centered on ideological objectives and not on first principles. If we are to improve our experience of self-government, these are the kinds of ideals we must embrace: virtue, order, respect for the rule of law, and a peaceful transition of power. Like the civil rights movement, we must be grounded in higher truths.

While America has faltered at many times due to racism and internal violence, we are still the greatest country in the world that has expanded freedom more than any other nation in history. Helping to rediscover these truths – including the principles of Juneteenth – can make us a nation where self-reliance not only keep on going but prosperous.

Ray Nothstine is an editor of the Carolina Journal and a Second Amendment fellow at the John Locke Foundation.

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Home rule

Scottish independence: “home rule” should be considered, says Labor MSP

Alex Rowley, who represents Midland Scotland and Fife in the Scottish Parliament, said “all options” should be on the table, including devo max alongside yes and no options.

He told the Herald on Sunday that Scotland was in a “constitutional impasse” which was unsustainable.

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The chances of the Scottish government winning the referendum tribunal battle are ‘pretty slim’, according to…

Scottish independence supporters hold a march and rally outside the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. Photo by Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty

“It translates into bad government, rewards political parties for maintaining divisions, and so we have to find a way forward and fix it,” he said.

Mr Rowley said the division and healing of the nation could not be solved by ‘telling 50 per cent of the population that they were wrong’.

“The way forward must be an open, civil debate that looks at the issues and has all the options on the table,” he said.

“My own view is that the ‘home rule’ option should be considered part of the debate, but regardless, the significant and material change since 2014 means that the same binary choice is not more on the table.”

Party leader Anas Sarwar has always ruled out backing a second referendum and accused Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon of “pitting Scots against Scots”.

A Scottish Labor spokesperson said: “In the election, Nicola Sturgeon promised her priority would be our recovery from Covid. But, true to form, she returned to the politics of divisiveness and Scottish versus Scottish opposition.

“This is all a deliberate attempt to distract from his failures.

“Scottish Labor MSPs consistently point to the failure of his government to use the powers it already has to deal with the cost of living crisis, the pressures on our health services, the lack of action on our gap growing in education and failures in transport

“The next electoral contest in Scotland will not be a referendum – it will be a general election. It is an opportunity for change.

The SNP said Mr Rowley should change his ‘broken record’.

Rona MacKay told the Herald on Sunday that “nobody can trust” Scottish Labor to keep their word.

The Strathkelvin and Bearsden MSP said: ‘Scottish Labor made the same vow to Scotland in 2014 and then broke that promise.

“No one can trust them to keep their word this time.

“And no amount of constitutional tinkering would protect Scotland from Brexit disaster or the Tory-created cost of living crisis.

“The only way for Scotland to escape the corrosive control of Westminster is with the full powers of independence.

“However, Alex Rowley clearly recognizes Scotland’s right to choose its own future in a referendum, so he should demand that his boss, Anas Sarwar, abandon his Donald Trump policy of denying clear democratic election results delivered. by the people of this country.”

Constitutional expert Aileen McHarg, professor of public law and human rights at Durham University, said the chances of the Scottish government winning a court battle over a second independence referendum are “pretty slim “.

The comments come after Ms Sturgeon launched her new campaign for independence in Edinburgh on Tuesday, with preparations underway to hold another referendum in October 2023.

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Home rule

‘House rules’ should factor into indyref2 debate, says Labor MSP

Scottish Labor MP Alex Rowley has called for ‘home rule’ to be considered as part of the ongoing debate around a second independence referendum.

Rowley, who represents Central Scotland and Fife, said ‘all options’ should be on the table amid the ongoing debate around a second independence referendum, including devo max alongside yes and no options. Speaking to the Herald on Sunday, he claimed Scotland was currently in a ‘constitutional impasse’.

“It translates into bad government, rewards political parties for maintaining divisions, and so we have to find a way forward and fix it,” he said.

Rowley claimed that the division and healing of the nation cannot be solved by “telling 50% of the population that they are wrong”. “The way forward must be an open, civil debate that looks at the issues and has all the options on the table,” he said.

“My own view is that the option of autonomy should be seen as part of the debate but, regardless, the significant and material change since 2014 means that the same binary choice is no longer on Table.”

However, SNP MSP Rona MacKay hit back, saying ‘no one can be trusted’ Scottish Labor to keep their word.

MacKay said: “Scottish Labor made the same vow to Scotland in 2014 and then broke that promise. No one can trust them to keep their word this time. And no amount of constitutional tinkering would protect Scotland from Brexit disaster or the Tory-created cost-of-living crisis.

READ MORE: Yes activists share thoughts on indyref2 plans

“The only way for Scotland to escape the corrosive control of Westminster is with the full powers of independence. However, Alex Rowley clearly recognizes Scotland’s right to choose its own future in a referendum, he should therefore demand that his boss, Anas Sarwar, abandon his Donald Trump policy of denying clear democratic election results delivered by the people of this country.

Party leader Anas Sarwar has always ruled out supporting a second referendum. Asked on the Sunday Show if he thought an independence referendum should be ‘categorically’ ruled out in the next 10 years, he said: ‘We said from the start of the election campaign that we think Parliament should focus on our recovery and that is why we did not support a referendum.

“On the principle that Scots have a right to choose, I of course believe that Scots have a right to choose. But fundamentally, during the mandate, we should focus on recovery.

Sarwar also said he will “in a few weeks” present his vision of alternatives to a second independence referendum, saying Labor wants to demonstrate that “the next electoral context will be a general election”.

“[We want to show] what it means to vote for Labor in this general election and what change looks like across the UK, what change looks like for people in Scotland,” said Sarwar.

READ MORE: England Labor should back Nicola Sturgeon on Scottish independence

“Yes the Tories are a disaster, yes I want to kick them out, yes I disagree with the priorities of the SNP – I think it’s bad government here in Scotland – but we can’t wait for the public to want them to lose. We have to serve them.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, along with Greens co-leader Patrick Harvie, kicked off the indyref2 campaign last week by launching a series of new materials making the case for an independent Scotland.

Sturgeon has insisted a referendum will take place with or without an Article 30 order, while Scottish Conservative leader Douglas Ross has vowed to boycott any “wildcat” ballot.

A recent Scottish election survey found that 55% of voters saw the results of the last election as a mandate for indyref2, based on a neutral question.

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Independence activist

Veteran Taiwan Independence Activist Wu Li-pei Publishes English Memoirs | Taiwan News

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Former presidential adviser Wu Li-pei (吳澧培) recently released his English-language memoir in the United States to explain his vision for the country’s future as an independent nation, reported Thursday. June 16.


The book, titled “Two Countries: My Taiwanese American Immigrant Story”, went on sale in the United States in late May and more than 100 people checked into a hotel in Los Angeles, California on June 12 for a viewing of dedication by the author, CNA reported.


Wu, 88, from Changhua County, got into banking in the United States and founded the Taiwan American Citizens League (TACL) in 1985, sending young people as congressional interns. Boston’s first female mayor, Michelle Wu, was a member of the TACL, he said.


Discussing his views with CNA, Wu Li-pei said that if Taiwan kept the official name “Republic of China” (ROC), it could never become a normal country. The United States will never abandon the People’s Republic of China to pass recognition to the ROC, he said.


The government must come up with a long-term plan to allow more people to identify with the name Taiwan, as the country would only have a future under that name, said Wu, who is an uncle of the foreign minister. foreign Joseph Wu (吳釗燮).


He acknowledged that a name change could not be done quickly, although the term “ROC” should only be used on official documents, and “Taiwan” in all other possible cases.


Turning to the threat posed by China, Wu described the communist regime as a pragmatic government that will not attack Taiwan because it is not yet ready to do so. “Today is still not the day” that China will invade, as it could not afford to counter the involvement of the United States and Japan.

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Home rule

The Home Rule Music Festival carries on the spirit of Black Fire Records

In the 1970s, Washington-based Black Fire Records was both an incubator and reliquary of DC’s African-American music and culture and a living symbol of the Black Power and Black Consciousness movements. Charvis Campbell wanted to celebrate it.

” We had to Something in the spirit of Black Fire,” said Campbell, owner of Petworth’s HR Records and head of its adjacent nonprofit, the Home Rule Music and Film Preservation Foundation. To start, he invited Richmond saxophonist James “Plunky” Branch – who co-founded Black Fire with local jazz DJ Jimmy “Black Fire” Gray (who died in 1999) and fronted a jazz band called The Oneness of Juju for the label. — to perform in DC in 2021.

“I was so in love with this guy,” Campbell recalled. “The stories he told, the music – he had it all. And on the way out, I talked to Plunky, and I was like, ‘We have to do a documentary. Can I help you ?’ He said, ‘Sure, let’s talk about it.’

It was not a well-covered topic in music history. Primarily a jazz label, Black Fire was a small, niche operation with sales mostly concentrated in the DC area. Outside of the Beltway, most of his artists and recordings had cult hits at best.

On the other hand, its founding in 1975 coincided with the beginning of DC’s inner regime (to which the “HR” of Campbell’s operation refers), itself a microcosm of the growing political, social and economic consciousness of the African-Americans of the time. And it had significance beyond symbolism: Black Fire’s roster slowly expanded beyond jazz to include soul, funk and the early recordings of genre group Experience Unlimited – later known as from EU, one of the main artists in the DC go-go music scene. (A decade after his Black Fire debut, EU would perform “Da Butt” in Spike Lee’s “School Daze,” bringing perhaps his brightest international spotlight.)

It was a legacy worth commemorating.

Armed with a grant from HumanitiesDC and a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, Campbell assembled a team to produce “The Black Fire Documentary,” a 28-minute film that chronicles the label through archival footage and about two dozens of interviews (including, full disclosure, this writer).

But that wasn’t enough, Campbell decided. “Black Fire” needed a real splash.

The Home Rule Foundation was already sponsoring a series of concerts and movies at the Parks, an outdoor community space on the former Walter Reed campus. “The light bulb went on,” Campbell said. “Why don’t we get Plunky, try to get EU and [other representative artists]and spend a day of music, then end the day with the screening of the documentary? »

Branch quickly agreed. Jimmy Gray’s son, Jamal, a DC-based musician and curator, has also signed on to help the Home Rule Foundation organize the festival, scheduled for June 11 at the parks. Although EU has already been booked for a gig in Virginia, lead singer Gregory “Sugar Bear” Elliott has signed on for another date to lead a workshop on go-go music and culture.

Added to the procedure are artists who did not record for Black Fire but who represented the same era, the same philosophy and the same aesthetic. If the EU can’t make it happen, TCB – another beloved and long-running go-go band – can. Doug Carn, a witty jazz pianist (and a frequent presence at DC’s Bohemian Caverns in the 2000s and 2010s), recorded in the 1970s for the Black Jazz label of Oakland, California. He agreed to perform and lead a meditation workshop. CapitalBop, DC’s loyal jazz advocacy organization, features an octet led by saxophonist David Murray, arguably the most iconic avant-garde jazz artist of the 1970s and 1980s.

Add DJs to open the proceedings, on-site concessions by Denizens Brewing and Anxo restaurant and cider house, and even a special one-edition Home Rule magazine (in homage to Gray’s old Black Fire magazine), and a day of music and film becomes a full-fledged Home Rule festival.

Branch and Oneness of Juju close out the musical program, with the saxophonist next performing in the climactic documentary.

There’s a certain eerie irony in celebrating Black Fire — emblematic as it is of DC’s largely bygone ‘Chocolate City’ design — in Walter Reed’s parks, whose mixed-use redevelopment is a symbol of contemporary gentrification in the capital.

Yet there is also a note of victory. Amid new condominiums, a charter school and a Whole Foods, old DC is once again leaving an indelible mark.

“I think we’re hitting all the key components and under the guise of trying to follow the spirit of Black Fire and Jimmy, if we can,” Campbell says. “It’s tough on these tracks, but we’re doing our best. And we’re really excited about it.

Parks at Walter Reed, 1010 Butternut St. NW. homerulemusicfestival.com.

Date: June 11 from 3 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (the rainy date is June 12.)

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Sovereignty

Kerala launches tourism project by engaging in local self-government institutions

In an initiative to identify at least one tourist destination within each local self-government institution in the state, the Kerala Tourism Department on Wednesday launched the “Destination Challenge” project in collaboration with the Local Self-Government Department ( LSGD).

Local Government Minister, MV Govindan, presented the project, at a ceremony presided over by Tourism Minister, PA Mohamed Riyas, here today.

The project aims to develop tourism by ensuring the participation of local self-government institutions (LSGI) right from the village panchayats. The state government has given the administrative penalty for Rs 50 crore for the implementation of the project. Govindan, who has activated the “Destination Challenge” web portal, said the initiative will help LSGIs find financial resources, in addition to exploring many unexplored destinations to bring them onto the tourism map.

“In addition to providing civic services, LSGIs must reach new levels to become self-sufficient. We must plan projects that allow for overall growth. Tourism is an ideal sector for panchayats, municipalities and businesses to become job providers and also achieve financial stability,” he added.

Noting that the “Destination Challenge” is a new step forward for Kerala Tourism, Riyas said that through the project, the government plans to develop at least 500 tourist destinations in four years. Riyas said the project is part of the Ministry of Tourism’s efforts to develop a new tourism culture in the state and bring about significant change in four years. Marketing campaigns would also be intensified under the initiative.

“During the first phase of 2022, the state recorded a surge in the arrival of domestic tourists, touching around 38 lakh. ‘Destination Challenge’ will help develop tourist circuits in LSGIs and thus attract more domestic tourists,” he added.

The Mayor of Thiruvananthapuram Corporation, Arya Rajendran was the chief guest at the ceremony.

The Ministry of Tourism would bear 60% (maximum Rs 50 lakh) of the total cost of the project. LSGIs can get the rest of the amount either from their own fund or through sponsorship.

In addition to identifying at least one destination under each LSGI, the initiative envisions linking tourism activities to various LSGI projects, thus giving a boost to domestic tourism, which has grown in popularity after the pandemic.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Home rule

Matteson asks voters for home rule as Tinley Park District 140 seeks new school

Matteson officials promise lower taxes and fees if voters approve a June 28 referendum giving the village self-governing authority.

Such a decision “provides a greater level of self-determination” and gives the village greater financial flexibility, according to the village.

This is the second time Matteson has tried to win self-government status, as the referendum was rejected by voters in 2014.

Also on the primary ballot, a referendum in Kirby Elementary District 140 in Tinley Park seeks approval to build a new school, paid for with available cash reserves.

The self-governing authority gives a community options to impose new taxes, such as a sales tax or transfer tax, on property sales. Matteson officials passed a resolution stating that they had no plans to implement a transfer tax if voters approved of self-government.

The village council also recently put a cap on the village tax levy, with no increase for five years, even if the bylaws are approved.

Matteson officials said plans include using self-government status to “diversify revenue streams” to become less dependent on property taxes as a source of revenue.

The village would eliminate, with the exception of commercial vehicles, vehicle vignette fees and also remove a 1% tax on food and beverages purchased from restaurants and other venues that have catering facilities.

Illinois communities with a population of at least 25,000 automatically receive self-governing authority, and some that are under that population have gone to voters to win self-governing powers.

Matteson’s population is 19,374, according to the 2020 census, up from just under 18,300 in 2010.

Along with a transfer tax, self-governing communities can enact a sales tax, and Matteson is considering such a tax to pay for infrastructure work, such as improving village streets.

According to the village, the self-governing authority would also allow it to use the tax revenue generated from its hotel/motel tax for general fund purposes.

Officials said a separate domestic tax could also be applied to goods shipped from an Amazon fulfillment center, which opened last fall.

At a town hall meeting on Thursday, where much of the discussion centered on the benefits of embracing self-reliance, Mayor Sheila Chalmers-Currin said voter approval “would take Matteson to the next level. “.

Financially and in terms of economic development, Matteson is succeeding, said village administrator Anthony Burton, but would benefit more from self-governing approval.

“We’re doing well and we can do better,” Burton said.

The home rule would also allow Matteson to enact tougher crime-free housing rules aimed at rental units, Police Chief Michael Jones said at the meeting.

“It gives us a bit more bite and responsibility,” he said.

Separately, Kirby District 140 is seeking voter approval to tap into cash reserves to build a new Fernway Park School just west of the existing school at 16600 88th Ave., Orland Park.

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The district said there would be no property tax impact on residents of the district, but voter approval is needed to tap the reserves for the project, which would see an 83,000 square foot school built. at an estimated cost of $34 million.

The district had last summer considered three options that included building from scratch or adding to the existing school and renovating the 42,000 square foot space.

Remodeling the existing building and adding 42,000 square feet cost $25.5 million, while the 25,000 square foot remodel and adding 65,000 square feet was estimated at $31 million, according to Superintendent Michael Byrne. Both of these options were deemed too disruptive to the functioning of the school.

With the new building, the district will consolidate early childhood programs at Fernway, centralizing services for preschoolers and freeing up classrooms at other elementary schools in the district, according to District 140.

If voters approve the plan, the district plans to start next year and have the new school ready for the 2024-25 school year.

The existing building will continue to be used during construction, but will eventually be demolished to make way for parking, a playground and green space, according to the district.

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Home rule

City Council embraces idea of ​​’bylaws’ that could change Clarksville government

CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) — New legislation before City Council could trigger a referendum to reorganize the city of Clarksville under a “self-government” charter, and council members have questions. Questions such as, what is a self-governance charter?

The ordinance sponsored by council member Trisha Butler would add a referendum to the November ballot asking citizens if they would like Clarksville to have a self-government charter, something she has often expressed interest in.

“It shouldn’t come as a surprise because I’ve been shouting this from my seat for the last year,” Butler said during Thursday’s meeting.

What are “house rules”?

In Tennessee, home rule allows a city to change its own charter — essentially the city’s constitution — by referendum. If Butler’s amendment is successful, home rule would be added to the November ballot.

Basically, under the Home Rule, citizens vote directly on charter amendments every two years. A common model involves the formation of a committee to draft amendments, which are then added to the ballot.

Clarksville currently has a “private deed” charter, which requires approval from the state legislature to change. A home rule charter would remove state government from the equation, returning the affairs of the city to the citizens.

“Essentially, we can change our charter at the city level after allowing Clarksville residents to vote on amendments to our charter,” Butler said at the meeting. “It basically says we can make the best decisions for Clarksville rather than the state legislature, specifically that people should get more of a voice in what we do here.

Local self-government also allows citizens to add amendments via a petition.

According to Butler, 17 cities in Tennessee have self-government charters, including Knoxville, Chattanooga and Memphis.

“Too Big to Be Wrong”

Several council members have expressed concerns about a referendum on the domestic regime.

Brian Zacharias told fellow council members he fears a self-governance charter could lead to politicizing the city charter by subjecting it to the campaign process, which is often dictated by the party that spends more that the other.

Furthermore, he suggested that the domestic regime is a complicated issue and voters may not have enough time to make an informed decision by November.

“I think the simplicity of the question, ‘Should Clarksville adopt home rule?’ belies the seriousness of the consequences of this decision. How many voters understand what this question really asks? How many people in this room understand what this question really asks?

“Before we put this on the ballot, I think the city owes some information to its residents,” Zacharias said. “It’s too big to be wrong. We need the highest turnout possible, and we need those voters to fully understand what they’re being asked to consider.

Councilwoman Stacey Streetman voiced her opposition to a Home Rule referendum, suggesting that the city’s current structure is working and doesn’t need fixing.

“Our government has worked efficiently and effectively since our incorporation. We’ve been a private deed charter for a long time,” Streetman said.

Vondell Richmond, Wanda Smith, Karen Reynolds and Joe Shakeenab expressed similar concerns, citing the need for more information.

“A lot of things are catastrophic”

Butler responded by suggesting that these concerns underestimate the average voter, and that while three months is enough time to decide which candidate to vote for, that’s enough time to learn more about autonomy.

“I’m really disappointed with the amount of mistrust I’m hearing for the voter, for the citizen. … The fact that things are getting politicized should not overwhelm the voice of the people,” Butler said.

Butler called some concerns “catastrophic,” but said she could see the benefit of postponing a referendum until the next presidential election, which still sees the highest turnout in Montgomery County, and that would be in November 2024.

Wallace Redd and Ambar Marquis joined Butler in expressing support for a self-government referendum.

City Council will vote at its meeting Thursday at 6 p.m. If passed, the measure will require a second vote at the next meeting currently scheduled for July 7.

Correction: A previous version of this article should have stated that the ordinance sponsored by council member Trisha Butler would add a referendum to the November ballot.

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