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November 2021

Self government

America needs self-government, not American corporate government

Jim Simon’s defense of stakeholder capitalism (November 13) should invite a chorus of responses. Mine takes place along two tracks. First, Simon’s rosy gaze for stakeholder capitalism blurs the structural commitments that make capitalism, well, capitalism.

After:Can American companies meet needs that the government does not?

And second, his belief that an enlightened business sector can overcome public problems obscures a dangerous paradox: such insistence will require embracing the debilitating restrictions of privacy.

Jeff Kurtz lives in Newark, Ohio, and teaches at Denison University in Granville.

Feeling good while doing good forgets that stakeholders always and always navigate social and political issues through a disheartening fog of loneliness. Government, at its best, invites us to wrap ourselves in the mantle of citizenship. This title is infinitely more important than that of stakeholder.

Simon’s logic in the name of stakeholder capitalism is compelling. How to be disappointed by the fervor of millennial workersof which 63% believe that “the primary objective of companies should be to ‘improve society’?”

The condemnation of these new workers will inspire companies to get on the right side of climate change, immigration, health, education, race relations, income equality and countless other issues. The conference room will set us free! The promised land is adjacent to the water fountain!

The problem with Simon’s argument is this: the practices of capitalism are baked into the recipe for structure and cannot be reconciled with genuine altruistic engagement with the aforementioned public issues.

Uncompromising attention (because attention must be paid) to the profits, bottom lines, margin losses and mercenary results that capitalism demands means that the structural system cannot be spiced up with clever substitutes. Mashed potatoes call for butter. Lots of butter. Olive oil can be an alternative, but let’s face it, you’re not eating real mashed potatoes.

Socially minded stakeholders may want companies to do more for the public good; workers may want the companies to which they donate their valuable labor to do more than scan budget sheets and count their stock earnings.

But the truth is harder to accept: capitalism revolves around an ethos of necessary exploitation – resources, time, labor – essential to the momentum and success of the structure. No sugar or gluten in this birthday cake? You may as well eat porridge. And everyone knows it.

The disturbing crux of Simon’s meditation is the resignation she projects on politics and governance. Yes, polls confirm that the federal government is among our least trusted cultural institutions. Yes, partisanship has too long acted as the purpose for the government.

After:Two-party system like a “flesh-eating virus” that kills from within, we need a third

But we also know that self-government can push us to confront issues at local, regional and national/global levels that take us beyond the easy belief of stakeholder capitalism that “ethical behavior” will follow when corporations revel in of their “social purpose”.

Stakeholder capitalism will never achieve this public spirit. It draws on our private feelings, feelings of complacency, easy engagement, detached stewardship as social conscience.

Make no mistake: stakeholder capitalism is your great-grandmother’s capitalism. It is the capitalism of Henry Ford and British Petroleum, of Mark Zuckerberg and Steven Jobs. He is implacable, indifferent and indifferent to the public good. The more things change, the more they stay the same. You do not believe me ? Check your wallet.

Unlike Ronald Reagan about the anxieties that follow when the government knocks on the door and offers help, we must seize the opportunities the government offers to solve pressing public problems. COVID-19 vaccines were not isolated industry triumphs. The government mattered. Hitler’s fascism was not defeated in the workshop. The government mattered.

But government cannot be a passive business. We must be responsible for the practices that genuine self-government requires: we need government, as Lincoln knew, to do what we cannot do on our own, things we can accomplish when we work towards ideals greater than ourselves.

Instead of stakeholders, we need citizens. Instead of socially conscious businesses, we need to double down on self-government and regain public trust.

Langston Hughes understood this well: America can become America again. Not because of compassion capital, but because we believe in each other.

Jeff Kurtz lives in Newark, Ohio, and teaches at Denison University in Granville.

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Self government

America Needs Autonomy, Not “Compassionate” Capitalism

Jim Simon’s defense of stakeholder capitalism (November 13) should invite a chorus of responses. Mine runs along two tracks. First, Simon’s optimistic look at stakeholder capitalism blurs the structural commitments that make capitalism, well, capitalism.

Following: Can American businesses meet needs that the government is not meeting?

And second, its belief that an enlightened corporate sector can overcome public problems masks a dangerous paradox: such insistence will force one to embrace debilitating restrictions on privacy.

Jeff Kurtz lives in Newark, Ohio, and teaches at Denison University in Granville.

Feeling good by doing good ignores the fact that stakeholders always navigate social and political issues through a disheartening fog of loneliness. Government, at its best, invites us to wrap ourselves in the mantle of the citizen. This title is infinitely more important than stakeholder.

Simon’s logic on behalf of stakeholder capitalism seems compelling. How can you be disappointed with the fervor of millennial workers, 63% of whom believe the “primary goal of businesses should be to improve society?” “

Sentencing of these new workers will prompt companies to side with climate change, immigration, healthcare, education, race relations, income equality and countless other issues. . The boardroom will set us free! The Promised Land is adjacent to the water fountain!

The problem with Simon’s argument is this: the practices of capitalism are baked into the recipe for structure and cannot be reconciled with genuine altruistic engagement with the aforementioned public issues.

Uncompromising attention (because attention must be paid) to profit, to results, to loss of margin and to the mercenary productions demanded by capitalism means that the structural system cannot be adorned with intelligent substitutes. Mashed potatoes call for butter. Lots of butter. Olive oil can be an alternative, but let’s face it, you aren’t eating real mashed potatoes.

Socially minded stakeholders may aspire to see companies do more for the public good; workers may want the companies they give their valuable work to to do more than sift through budget sheets and count their profits in shares.

But the truth is more difficult to accept: capitalism rests on a necessary ethics of exploitation – of resources, time, work – essential to the momentum and the success of the structure. No sugar or gluten in this birthday cake? You can also eat porridge well. And everyone knows it.

The troubling knot of Simon’s meditation is the resignation it projects on politics and governance. Yes, polls confirm that the federal government is one of our least trusted cultural institutions. Yes, partisanship has acted like the purpose for the government.

Following: Two-party system like a “flesh-eating virus” that kills from within, we need a third

But we also know that self-government can push us to confront issues at the local, regional and national / global levels that push us beyond the easy belief of stakeholder capitalism that ‘ethical behavior’ will follow when decisions are made. companies will revel in their “social purpose”.

Stakeholder capitalism will never achieve this public spirit. His claim is about our private feelings, our feelings of self-righteousness, easy engagement, detached stewardship as a social conscience.

Make no mistake: Stakeholder capitalism is your great-grandmother’s capitalism. It is the capitalism of Henry Ford and British Petroleum, of Mark Zuckerberg and of Steven Jobs. She is relentless, indifferent and indifferent to the public good. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Do not believe me ? Check your wallet.

Contrary to Ronald Reagan’s mind about the anxieties that arise when government knocks on doors and offers to help, we must seize the opportunities the government offers to resolve pressing public issues. COVID-19 vaccines weren’t isolated triumphs of the industry. The government mattered. Hitler’s fascism was not defeated in the fabrication shop. The government mattered.

But government cannot be a passive business. We need to be accountable for the practices that genuine self-government requires: we need government, as Lincoln knew, to do what we cannot do for ourselves, things we can accomplish when we work towards ideals greater than ourselves.

Instead of actors, we need citizens. Instead of socially conscious businesses, we need to redouble our efforts on self-government and regain public trust.

Langston Hughes got it right: America can become America again. Not because of compassion, but because we believe in each other.

Jeff Kurtz lives in Newark, Ohio, and teaches at Denison University in Granville.

This article originally appeared on The Columbus Dispatch: America Needs Autonomy, Not American Corporate Government

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Self government

Is self-government the answer to the Canada-Indigenous relationship?

From the lack of clean water in some Indigenous communities to the lingering anger over residential schools, Canada’s relationship with its Indigenous citizens needs to be repaired. Symbols like lowering the Canadian flag or declaring a national holiday may score political points, but they do not address any of the main concerns of Indigenous Canadians. One proposed solution is to take Ottawa out of the equation and let Indigenous communities govern themselves. Another is to open the doors to economic development – ​​both resource and otherwise.

In this edition of The Andrew Lawton Show, we discuss the economic and political climate surrounding First Nations in Canada. Joining the discussion are public policy expert Melissa Mbarki, an Indigenous veteran of the oil and gas industry, and researcher Heather Exner-Pirot, both of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE ANDREW LAWTON SHOW

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This is why independent media in Canada is more important than ever. If you can, please make a tax-deductible donation to True North today. Thank you so much.

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Home rule

Rising number of cases sees Public Health Sudbury reinstate work-from-home rule starting Monday

Saying local COVID-19 case rates remain “unacceptably high,” Public Health Sudbury & Districts is reinstating work-from-home requirements starting Monday.

High rates of COVID-19 cases mean the Public Health Sudbury & Districts region is among the three hardest-hit jurisdictions in Ontario, according to a news release released Friday.

Local protective measures, including reinstating capacity limits first published Nov. 8, have suppressed rapid case growth; however, case rates remain unacceptably high, threatening health and the healthcare system, in-person learning and local transition to a “reopened” community, the health unit said.

The PHSD said it was announcing “a measured and responsible approach to the current situation”. The medical officer of health reinstates work-from-home requirements, revoked by the province on July 15, issuing strong recommendations for COVID-19 protections to area schools, businesses and organizations, and adopting stricter measures for tracking contacts of COVID-19 cases.

“We have carefully reviewed recent data and consulted with the province’s Chief Medical Officer of Health,” said Dr. Penny Sutcliffe, Medical Officer of Health for Public Health Sudbury & Districts.

“While school-based cases and household spread are currently driving our high case counts, cases continue to be reported in young adults, social settings and workplaces. It’s hard to find a setting that isn’t impacted.

“With the widespread circulation of the virus in our community, our response must also be widespread, reducing mobility and face-to-face interactions overall. This is the purpose of homework instructions. Moreover, every sector must do its part, voluntarily at this time, to pave the way for lower case rates and reopening. »

You can read the full instruction letter here.

Effective 12:01 a.m. on Monday, November 29, the updated letter of direction will require businesses and organizations open in the City of Greater Sudbury to ensure workers perform their work remotely, unless nature of their work does not require them to be on-site at the workplace. Some exceptions apply, the health unit said, which you can find in the letter.

Public Health is also partnering with area school boards to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in schools and further protect in-person learning.

Among the measures strongly recommended by the Medical Officer of Health to school boards is the voluntary rapid antigen test (RAT) screening of students. This is rolling out now and ahead of the holiday season, providing another layer of protection.

Other strongly recommended actions also include requiring RAT screening or proof of vaccination for students participating in certain extracurricular sports, strengthening health and safety measures, and mandating daily confirmation of symptom screening. .

“COVID-19 should not be underestimated,” Sutcliffe added.

“We have high vaccination coverage rates and now offer vaccines to primary school-aged children. The path traveled is truly remarkable. However, the highly transmissible variant of COVID Delta requires that we apply as many protections as possible. To enhance these protections, Public Health will tighten our contact tracing protocols so that in certain circumstances some people, even if fully immune, will need to self-isolate.

“We will also require unvaccinated children to stay home if they have an unvaccinated family member who has been exposed to a case. We should conduct ourselves knowing that every action counts – this means that every layer of protection we can put on ourselves and our family members reduces our risk of becoming infected and possibly developing serious acute or life-threatening symptoms. long term.

“Tragically, we have witnessed 38 deaths from COVID-19 across our region, and of these, seven people have died in the past five weeks. Notably, and a change from what we were seeing earlier in the pandemic, is that five of the people who have lost their lives since late October were in their 50s and 60s, further highlighting everyone’s vulnerability when the COVID-19 has the ability to spread.”

Public Health reiterates its call on everyone to continue to limit your outings, work from home, get vaccinated, wear your mask and keep a distance of two meters from people outside your home.

Monitor yourself for symptoms and stay home if sick – even mildly symptomatic people should immediately self-isolate and get tested to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our community. With the holiday season fast approaching, these guidelines should guide your decisions about pre-holiday celebrations.

Learn more at phsd.ca/COVID-19.

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Independence activist

Hong Kong independence activist jailed for secession | New

Tony Chung, 20, is the youngest person sentenced under the new law that has crushed dissent in Hong Kong.

A young Hong Kong democracy activist has been sentenced to three and a half years behind bars after pleading guilty to secession under the city’s sweeping national security law.

With Tuesday’s conviction, Tony Chung, 20, is now the youngest person convicted under the law, which has crushed dissent in Hong Kong and transformed the territory.

Earlier this month he pleaded guilty to one count of secession and one count of money laundering, but said he had “nothing to be ashamed of”.

Chung was previously the organizer of Studentlocalism, a small group he started five years ago as a high school student to advocate for Hong Kong’s independence from China.

Separation from China was a minority view in Hong Kong at the time, although calls for autonomy were more vocal in the massive pro-democracy protests two years ago.

Beijing imposed security law on Hong Kong in response to protests, which at times turned violent, and Studentlocalism was dissolved hours before the legislation took effect.

Authorities accused Chung of continuing to operate the group with the help of foreign activists and of soliciting donations through PayPal.

Prosecutors said Chung’s group posted more than 1,000 social media posts that included calls to “get rid of the Chinese Communist colonial rule” and “build a republic of Hong Kong.”

More than 150 orders

Some of the posts cited by prosecutors predated the imposition of the security law, although authorities had said the law would not be retroactive.

On Tuesday, Stanley Chan, one of a panel of judges selected by the government to try national security cases, said Chung’s criminal intent was “clear for all to see” on social media. , during interviews, in street kiosks and in schools.

“He actively organized, planned and implemented activities to separate the country,” the judge said.

Chung has already spent more than a year in detention after his arrest in October 2020.

He was arrested by plainclothes police in a cafe across from the US consulate, where he is said to have planned to seek asylum.

The security law covers anything the authorities deem to be subversion, “terrorism” or collusion with foreign forces.

Chung initially faced an additional charge of sedition and another count of money laundering, but they were suspended following a plea bargain.

In another case last December, Chung was jailed for four months for illegal assembly and insulting the Chinese national flag.

Four other men have so far been convicted in separate cases under the security law – mainly for their political views.

More than 150 people have been arrested under the law, and nearly half of them have been charged.

Bail is often denied, and guilty pleas are a way to reduce both the final sentence and the legal costs of a lengthy court battle.

Most Democratic politicians are now in prison or in self-exile. Dozens of civil society organizations have withdrawn and some international rights groups have left the city.

Chinese and Hong Kong authorities deny that the security law violates individual rights and say the legislation was needed to restore stability after the protests.

The former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997, with Beijing promising a high degree of autonomy for at least 50 years.

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Independence activist

Hong Kong independence activist jailed for secession

Published on:

Hong Kong (AFP) – A young democracy activist in Hong Kong was sentenced to three and a half years behind bars on Tuesday after pleading guilty to secession under the city’s sweeping national security law.

Tony Chung, 20, is the youngest person to be convicted under the new law that has crushed dissent in Hong Kong and transformed the once outspoken international business hub.

Earlier this month he pleaded guilty to one count of secession and one count of money laundering, but defiantly said he had “nothing to be ashamed of”.

Chung was previously the organizer of Student Localism, a small group he started five years ago as a high school student to advocate for Hong Kong independence from China.

Separation from China was then a fringe minority view in Hong Kong, although calls for autonomy became more vocal during huge and often violent democracy protests two years ago.

Beijing imposed the security law in Hong Kong in response to these protests and student localism dissolved hours before it took effect.

Authorities accused Chung of continuing to operate the group with the help of foreign activists and of soliciting donations through PayPal – the basis of the money laundering charge.

Prosecutors said Chung’s group posted more than 1,000 social media posts that included calls to “get rid of Chinese communist colonial rule” and “build a Hong Kong republic.”

Some of the posts cited by prosecutors dated back to before the security law was enacted, although Hong Kong officials promised the law would not be retroactive.

On Tuesday, Stanley Chan, a member of a panel of government-selected judges to try national security cases, said Chung’s criminal intent was “clear to all” on social media, in interviews, in street kiosks and in schools.

Chung has already spent more than a year in detention after his arrest in October 2020.

He was arrested by plainclothes police at a cafe opposite the US consulate, where he reportedly intends to seek asylum.

The security law targets anything authorities deem subversive, terrorist or colluding with foreign forces.

Chung initially faced an additional charge of sedition and another count of money laundering, but they were shelved following a plea bargain.

In a separate case last December, Chung was jailed for four months for unlawful assembly and insulting the Chinese national flag.

Four other men have so far been convicted in separate cases under the Security Act, mainly for their political views.

More than 150 people have been arrested under the legislation, about half of whom have been charged.

Bail is often denied and guilty pleas are a way to reduce both the final sentence and the court costs of a lengthy court battle.

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Independence activist

Hong Kong independence activist sentenced to prison under national security law

A 20-year-old activist who pleaded for Hong Kong’s independence from China was sentenced to three years and seven months in prison on Tuesday for breaking the country’s national security law.

Tony Chung pleaded guilty to secession under the law, which took effect in June 2020, according to the Washington Post.

Hong Kong’s Basic Law – in fact, its constitution – claims to enshrine freedom of expression. But under the new national security law, a speech determined to undermine the Chinese government may result in a charge of life in prison.

Chung’s crime, which he committed as a teenager, was completely non-violent and was carried out only through slogans, social media posts and speeches, the Post reported.

“Secession does not need to involve real violence,” Justice Stanley Chan said, according to the Post. “The penalty should deter future acts. “

Chung is the third person to face a prison term for violating the law and the youngest to be sentenced under it.

His sentence is slightly reduced from that previously imposed on Tong Ying-kit, 24, and Ma Chun-man, 31, due to his guilty plea.

” I plead guilty. I have no shame in my heart, ”Chung said earlier this month, according to the Post.

As a high school student, Chung was a co-founder of Studentlocalism, a group of student activists who advocated for Hong Kong independence. The group disbanded just before the national security law was passed, with officials saying it would not be applied retroactively, according to the Post.

But Chung was one of the first people to be arrested under it, with officials pointing to the manifesto and clothing produced by Studentlocalism in support of the charge. According to the Post, prosecutors justified this by claiming that Chung continued to violate the law after it came into effect.

The newspaper noted that Chung had previously attempted to seek asylum at the US consulate in Hong Kong, but was apprehended before his arrival. He has since been held without bail.

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Independence activist

Hong Kong’s youngest independence activist, 20, jailed for secession

Chung has already spent more than a year in detention after his arrest in October 2020. (File)

Hong Kong:

A young Hong Kong democracy activist was sentenced to three and a half years in prison on Tuesday after pleading guilty to secession under the city’s sweeping national security law.

Tony Chung, 20, is the youngest person to be sentenced under the new law that crushed dissent in Hong Kong and transformed the once outspoken international business hub.

Earlier this month, he pleaded guilty to one count of secession and one count of money laundering, but defiantly said he had “nothing to be ashamed of”.

Chung was previously the chairman of Student Localism, a small group he set up five years ago as a high school student to defend Hong Kong’s independence from China.

Separation from China was a minority view in Hong Kong then, although calls for autonomy became more vocal in huge and often violent protests for democracy two years ago.

Beijing imposed security law on Hong Kong in response to the protests, and Student Localism was dissolved hours before it went into effect.

Authorities accused Chung of continuing to exploit the group with the help of foreign activists and of soliciting donations through PayPal – the basis of the money laundering charge.

Prosecutors said Chung’s group had posted more than 1,000 social media posts, including calls to “get rid of the Chinese Communist colonial regime” and “build a republic of Hong Kong.”

Some of the posts cited by prosecutors predate the enactment of the Security Law, although Hong Kong officials have promised the law will not be retroactive.

On Tuesday, Stanley Chan, one of a panel of judges selected by the government to try national security cases, said Chung’s criminal intent was “clear for all to see” on social media. , in interviews, in street kiosks and in schools.

Chung has already spent more than a year in detention after his arrest in October 2020.

He was arrested by plainclothes police at a cafe across from the US Consulate, where he was considering seeking asylum.

The security law covers anything the authorities deem to be subversion, terrorism or collusion with foreign forces.

Chung initially faced an additional charge of sedition and another count of money laundering, but they were suspended following a plea bargain.

In another case last December, Chung was jailed for four months for illegal assembly and insulting the Chinese national flag.

Four other men have so far been convicted in separate cases under the security law, mainly for their political views.

More than 150 people have been arrested under the legislation, about half of whom have been charged.

Bail is often refused, and guilty pleas are a way to reduce both the final sentence and the legal costs of a lengthy court battle.

(Except for the title, this story was not edited by NDTV staff and is posted from a syndicated feed.)

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Sovereignty

NTI’s push for Inuit self-government is ‘the right thing’, says Idlout

Nunavut MP says she and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh ‘support’ recently passed resolution

Nunavut MP Lori Idlout said she supports the resolution passed this week by Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. to continue talks with Ottawa to achieve Inuit self-government.

“I believe NTI is doing the right thing,” Idlout said when asked Thursday what resolution NTI passed this week at its annual general meeting in Rankin Inlet.

“It’s sad for me to say this, but I agree that the Government of Nunavut, to this day, has let the Inuit down,” said Idlout, who is also the NDP spokesperson for Crown-Indigenous relations. .

NTI members on Tuesday passed a resolution to continue a negotiating mandate with the federal government for Inuit self-government.

NTI President Aluki Kotierk said the Government of Nunavut has failed to meet the needs of the territory’s Inuit majority.

“There are so many dire statistics, so many dire Inuit experiences right now,” Kotierk told Nunatsiaq News after the annual general meeting ended.

Idlout said she agrees with Kotierk’s assertion that the GN did not do enough to support the Inuit in the land.

“We have to see with the new Prime Minister and the cabinet that we have a sense of hope, that they will listen to the voters, that they will listen to the Inuit and make sure that they work very hard to improve their relationship with the NTI so we can see improvements for the Inuit community in Nunavut.

Newly elected Prime Minister PJ Akeeagok told reporters on Wednesday he was looking forward to meeting with NTI officials “to really listen in terms of areas where we could collaborate.”

Idlout said she had discussed the motion with NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and fully supported the motion.

“[He] is ready to support me and support my work with NTI because these failures have gone on for too long, ”she said. “We have seen it with the passage of Bill 25 in the Education Act and we have seen it with too many other initiatives where the Inuit are deprived of their civil rights. [and] are placed at a different level from that of French language rights.

Kotierk said she appreciates the support of the federal NDP.

“We look forward to working with the federal government and believe we will bring that up to our Crown Partnership process,” she said. She added that she had already had a conversation with the newly elected Premier of Nunavut, PJ Akeeagok, and that she “has no doubt” that the two will have a “positive and constructive working relationship.”

As for what Inuit self-government wants, Kotierk said it is still a work in progress to be determined.

“At this point everything is in the air to decide which areas we want to focus on,” she said. “The presentation we received from [NTI] The director of self-determination talked about … different models that we could look at in terms of seeking self-government. There was a discussion of how there are already models across Canada, but we could create a hybrid, ”she said.

“The next step will be to get the negotiating mandate and then build some capacity within [NTI] to be able to consult with the Inuit of Nunavut and work with our board of directors to determine what the constitution of the arm’s length body would look like, ”said Kotierk.

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Self government

Nunavut Inuit organization plans to seek self-government

Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., which represents approximately 30,000 Inuit in Nunavut, plans to advance self-government negotiations.

“What we would like to see is that there are better services provided to the Inuit of Nunavut that incorporate Inuit worldviews and end the current model of public government,” said NTI President, Aluki Kotierk.

It is good that the Government of Nunavut, established when the territory was created in 1999 by the Nunavut Act, was intended to serve its majority Inuit population.

But it hasn’t worked after 22 years, as evidenced by widespread poverty, hunger and a high incidence of suicide, Kotierk said.

“All of these different determinants that would determine whether or not lives are improving continue to be alarming. And so, it makes us think, is there a better way to meet the needs?” she told CBC.

“When we work with the Government of Nunavut, or want these specific programs, the answer is often, ‘But this is public government.'”

Therefore, NTI, which is the entity responsible for protecting the rights of Inuit under the Nunavut Agreementmust seek alternative means to meet the specific needs of Inuit, she said.

A resolution to this effect was passed Nov. 16 by delegates at NTI’s Annual General Meeting in Rankin Inlet.

Nunavut agreement not honored

According to Kotierk, one of the ways the public government has failed the Inuit is by not respecting some of the articles of the Nunavut Agreement, which was signed by the Inuit and the federal government in 1993 and sets out the Inuit land and other rights in the territory.

These include section 23, for example, which covers Inuit employment in the public service.

The article states that Inuit employment should reflect the percentage — approximately 85% of the 39,000 population — of the territory’s Inuit population.

A presentation on self-government at the annual general meeting noted that the goal was never achieved. A June territorial government report shows that Inuit make up only 50% of the Government of Nunavut’s workforce and only 20% of senior management.

This impacts how programs and services are designed and developed and the well-being of Nunavummiut, Kotierk said.

The result is “very evident in the way we continue to self-harm and the way we continue to have violent outbursts in our communities,” Kotierk said.

“And these are just symptoms of what continues to happen in our communities, and the system of public government is supposed to help alleviate this. And instead, it continues to deteriorate our sense of well-being.”

Kotierk, center, appears in the Nunavut Court of Justice in Iqaluit to file a lawsuit against the Government of Nunavut in October 2021. The lawsuit alleged that the Government of Nunavut discriminates against Inuit by not providing education in Inuktut at the same level as English and French. (Nick Murray/CBC News)

Legal action for discrimination in progress

The resolution comes after a year of disputes with the Nunavut government. In October, NTI filed a lawsuit against the Government of Nunavut alleging that it discriminates against Inuit by not offering education in Inuktut to the same degree as English or French.

Also in October, NTI considered a lawsuit over a change made by the Government of Nunavut to the way taxes are collected on Inuit-owned land.

Earlier this week, NTI’s presentation offered three options for AGM delegates to consider: reach an agreement with the Government of Nunavut to take over the services; develop NTI’s ability to provide services directly to Inuit; or committing the federal government to establishing formal self-government in Canada.

“If we pursue the comprehensive land claims approach, we know it will take many years,” Kotkierk said. “But we also know that if we go through an agreement right now that takes some responsibility for public services, that could be something that could start to address some of the issues that we have in our communities more immediately.”

As a first step, the adopted resolution asks the organization to obtain this negotiation mandate with the federal government.

“I think we’ve now been instructed to do the practical work of going to the federal government to ask for this warrant,” Kotierk said. “And we will work with our board of directors to come up with a constitution or a vision statement.”

A change of direction

But now there is a new player on the NTI field, new Premier PJ Akeeagok, who was elected Premier by his colleagues on Wednesday.

PJ Akeeagok speaks to the media following his selection as Premier of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut on Wednesday. (David Gunn/CBC)

Prior to entering land politics, Akeeagok led the Qikiqtani Inuit Association and served on the board of directors of NTI, where he supported the decision for self-government.

On Thursday, the day after his selection, Kotierk spoke to Akeeagok about areas they can work on.

“I suspect he will be very supportive of all the things Inuit organizations are trying to achieve through Inuit self-determination,” she said.

The two plan to meet on Monday, Kotierk said.

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Sovereignty

NTI says it will seek to negotiate Inuit self-government with Ottawa

Organization Says “Inuit Quality of Life Has Declined Alarmingly” under Nunavut Public Government

Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. says it will continue talks with the federal government to bring about Inuit self-government. NTI President Aluki Kotierk, seen here at the Aqsarniit Hotel in Iqaluit on August 13, said in a statement that the Government of Nunavut is “a regime that does not support us and does not want to that we succeed in realizing the vision of a prosperous and prosperous country. Nunavut. (File photo by Corey Larocque)

Through


Madalyn Howitt

Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. says it will seek to negotiate with Ottawa to achieve Inuit self-government.

NTI said in an article on its website that, since the creation of the public government of Nunavut 22 years ago, “the quality of life for Inuit has declined alarmingly.”

He said the Government of Nunavut opposes “policies, programs and services that would meet the needs of the Inuit, the majority population of Nunavut,” while “historic colonial policies, programs and services are championed or reinforced by the government focus on the non-Inuit minority. “

The announcement follows a resolution passed Tuesday by board members at the organization’s annual general meeting in Rankin Inlet this week.

NTI said it would pursue a negotiating mandate, which would open discussions between itself and the Government of Canada to consider “more viable options for the Inuit to take control of their own governance.”

“It will be difficult to continue … under a regime that does not support us and does not want us to achieve the vision of a prosperous and prosperous Nunavut,” NTI President Aluki Kotierk said in a statement.

“To rebuild the hope and dreams that [were] Originally envisioned for Inuit and their future generations, this conversation about self-government needs to start anew, ”said Kotierk. “We owe it to the Inuit to represent their full potential.

In October, NTI filed a lawsuit against the Government of Nunavut, claiming it had failed in its legal obligations to ensure that Inuktitut language instruction was offered throughout the territory’s public school system.

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Self government

Local Self-Government Forum in Ukraine: a key annual event

What is the agenda for democratic governance in Ukraine and other parts of Europe? What are the main achievements and challenges of the decentralization reform underway in Ukraine? What will be the constitutional amendments on decentralization and reform of state representation at sub-national levels?

These issues were addressed in the framework of the VI Forum on Local Self-Government in Ukraine, held on November 11-12, 2021. Other issues included: the right of association of local authorities; democratic governance in metropolitan areas; the development of mountain areas; protection of the rights of internally displaced persons.

The Local Self-Government Forum has been organized annually since 2017 to discuss the development of local self-government in Ukraine, including in conflict-affected regions (Donetsk and Luhansk). In 2021, the Center of Expertise for Good Governance, together with national partners, widened the target audience, and the Forum became a national level with the participation of local authorities from all over Ukraine.

The 2021 Forum brought together more than 750 participants from Ukraine via an online platform and 65 speakers. In addition, more than 1,100 viewers followed the broadcast live via social media, and National Broadcaster Radio posted 10 interviews with Forum speakers and guests.

In her video address, Ms Snežana Samardžić-Marković, Director General for Democracy, underlined that “… the good news is that you are not alone… at your request, the Council of Europe will continue to do its best. to support Ukraine in its efforts to improve democratic governance and respect for human rights and the rule of law.

The event was organized by the Center of Expertise for Good Governance through its program “Strengthening decentralization and reform of public administration in Ukraine” in cooperation with the Parliamentary Committee on State Building, Local Governance, Regional and Urban Development, Ukrainian Ministry of Community and Territory Development, Donetsk Oblast State Administration, Lviv Oblast State Administration and Luhansk Oblast State Administration.

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Home rule

Around Prince William: In a diverse state, it’s time to govern from home | Opinion

Virginia is a “Dillon Rule” state. This means localities can only exercise powers that are explicitly authorized to them by the state.

The political dynamic in America has changed significantly over the past few decades. The two parties that dominate American politics have redefined what sets them apart, resulting in a more polarized public policy environment. Compromise is not as common as it used to be. In Virginia, the Dillon Rule makes “winner takes all” elections and results in “one size fits all” public policy for the 133 vastly different counties and cities within its borders.

The results of the November 2 election clearly demonstrate that there really are two Virginias. Rural and urban politics, philosophy, beliefs and preferences divide us. It is OK as long as those who govern the Commonwealth, those who are elected to represent us all, recognize these differences.

There is no right or wrong here. Democratic or Republican, liberal or conservative, evangelical or secular are just different flavors of our society. The Constitution was written to protect those differences and defend all those different flavors as long as they don’t hurt others or take their business. This is the very essence of a free and civil society.

In today’s polarized society, however, both political parties have extreme elements who believe their particular flavor should be forced upon us all, using public policy as their tool. After eight years of Democratic control of the executive branch and its takeover of both houses of the Virginia legislature, rural Virginia has decided “enough” and elected Republican Glenn Youngkin as our next governor. Governors rarely assume office with a statewide mandate. They run on issues that appeal to their base and the moderate independents who actually decide who wins.

John Lydgate said it well: “You can please some people all the time, you can please everyone once in a while, but you can’t please everyone all the time.

The Dillon rule gives the governor and legislature the power to impose policies that please the base that elected them at the expense of those who voted otherwise. It’s time to reform this “one-size-fits-all” approach to government, scrap the Dillon Rule, and establish a domestic regime for Virginia’s widely diverse localities.

Virginians are generally used to tolerating whoever wins until the next election, realizing that incumbents must please enough voters to retain power in the next election. But that patience seems to be lacking these days.

One size does not fit all. In today’s polarized political environment, it is time to bring governance closer to the communities it serves. This allows those who govern to reflect the will of those who elected them while still being aware of the compromises necessary because of those who did not. “Those who haven’t” typically make up almost half of the community they serve.

Prince William County should partner with Fairfax and Loudoun counties and other urban areas to lobby the legislature to move governance to where it belongs, closer to the governed, by implementing autonomy. Some of the more rural counties in the state could sign on, acknowledging that victory is fleeting. It would be their best defense against the upcoming power shift in Virginia.

Al Alborn is an award-winning columnist and member of the Virginia Press Association. His column appears every two weeks. You can find out more about Al at www.alborn.net and LinkedIn.

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Self government

The Messenger – Second round of self-government elections took political polarization to a new level




The Messenger – Second round of self-government elections took political polarization to a new level<br>


Messenger logo

By Malkhaz Matsaberidze

Thursday November 11


The second round of autonomous elections on October 30 gave the results announced by the ruling National Movement. The authorities won the expected victory everywhere except Tsalenjikha. However, according to the opposition, fair and equitable elections no longer took place in Georgia and the Georgian Dream did not win, but instead rigged the elections.

The advantage of the Georgian dream winner in number and percentage does not seem very impressive – a few hundred or a thousand votes, which may be less than the number of canceled ballots in the respective constituency. The government and the opposition are trying to present two different images of the elections.

According to Georgian Dream, the elections were held according to all the rules and there can be no doubt that the ruling party will win again. No election will take place in the country before 2024, the country must calm down and start to rebuild itself.

The United National Movement and its affiliated opposition parties speak of outright electoral fraud and stolen victory. The issue of holding early parliamentary elections has not been removed from the opposition’s agenda. On the contrary, the issue of electoral administration reform has become more active and attached, as electoral commissions no longer deserve the trust of the opposition and are seen as falsifiers of election results.

According to the opposition, it is first necessary to open the electoral lists of the enclosure and it will become clear that “electoral carousels” have been turned on behalf of many emigrants or individuals. Name many facts about voter pressure and corruption.

Opposition members are already demanding that the government show the public Mikheil Saakashvili’s situation in any way, even by taking him to court, which the former president was not allowed to do yesterday. Some thought that after the October 30 elections, the government would take Saakashvili to hospital or send him for treatment abroad, say after President Salomé Zourabishvili’s pardon.

But on November 3, the 34th day of Saakashvili’s hunger strike, Zourabishvili declared for the second time that she “would never forgive” Saakashvili. The statements of the leaders of the Georgian Dream do not help to calm the situation either.

The Prime Minister announced that according to the law, “a person has the right to commit suicide”. According to Irakli Kobakhidze, Saakashvili’s hunger is a simulation. But what will happen and how will things turn out if Saakashvili’s body can no longer withstand hunger?

Saakashvili has many supporters and sympathizers who worry about the health of the third president and resort to various forms of protest, including the start of a hunger strike.

Saakashvili himself, despite the worsening situation, remains motivated and goal-oriented, sending messages through his teammates. According to Saakashvili, on October 30, the people won and an electoral revolution took place, and the government falsified the election results.

There is now a post-electoral revolution in Georgia, which must determine the outcome of the electoral revolution. Saakachvili, if he manages to get out of prison, promises to “carry out early elections within 10 days”. In another letter, Saakashvili called on Georgian emigrants to return to their homeland for a day and “that day will come soon”. Such statements by the hungry president are likely to worry the authorities.

Some opposition lawmakers are refusing to stand in the legislative elections in protest. Not all opponents will, but if 37 MPs resign, then constitutional changes will not be possible. The amendments were adopted at first reading on September 7. According to the project, the next two elections, which will be held in the proportional system, will be won by the parties which collect 2% of the vote.

It is in the interest of the small opposition parties. According to Mikheil Saakashvili, the opposition should only leave parliament after the adoption of these changes.

After the second round of elections, the word ?? revolution ?? is heard more and more often. According to one of the leaders of the opposition in this country, “the election has lost its meaning because its results are not written down by the voters”. According to the second leader of the opposition, if extraordinary elections are not organized by 2024, Bidzina Ivanishvili will be able to suffocate all the real opposition parties and only the puppet opposition will remain on the political scene.

Opposition groups have called for a change of government on social media and social media, prompting SUS to announce on November 3 that it has issued public statements calling for “revolution and the violent overthrow of the government, including by violence. The statement says that a person could be jailed for 3 years because of it.

According to the coalition, the government has announced a wave of repression, which will bring Georgia even closer to Belarus. In response, many opponents declared the need for a revolution.

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Home rule

HOUSE RULE: Chattanooga, Tucson win USL League One quarter-finals

TAMPA, Fla – Hosts Chattanooga Red Wolves SC and FC Tucson advanced to the USL League One playoff quarter-finals on Saturday night.

Both teams were stretched by their visitors on a compelling playoff opening night.

The No.3 Red Wolves needed extra time to secure a 2-1 win over No.6 North Texas SC at CHI Memorial Stadium as top scorer Juan Galindrez scored in the 113th minute to secure advancement.

Making his first playoff appearance, Chattanooga appeared in control of the game with the lead and a player advantage after North Texas was reduced to 10 men after a red card in the 29th minute, but the visitors fought back to score. a second-half goal for Bernard Kamungo to send the game into overtime.

The Red Wolves were also reduced to 10 players in the first overtime period, but managed to qualify to face No.2 seed Greenville Triumph SC next Saturday night.

No.4 seeded FC Tucson had to maintain considerable pressure throughout their clash with the No.5 seeded Richmond Kickers at Kino North Stadium, but an 87th-minute goal from Deri Corfe on the One shot on goal of the game for the hosts proved enough to secure the victory.

Tucson advance to face seeded Union Omaha at Werner Park next Saturday night.

The two semi-final matches will take place next Saturday night and will be broadcast live on ESPN +.

2021 USL Ligue 1 playoffs
(All hours Eastern; home team listed first)

Semi finals
Saturday 13 November
Union Omaha vs. Tucson FC, 5 p.m. ET, Werner Park
Greenville Triumph SC vs. Chattanooga Red Wolves SC, 7 p.m. ET, Legacy Early College

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Home rule

Freeport loses Home Rule status

ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – After years of decline, the city of Freeport has finally seen its population drop below 25,000 people. This means the city does not qualify for Home Rule status. Local self-government gives local governments the power to create laws locally without having to follow state-issued guidelines.

Every city above the 25,000 population threshold automatically gets this rule. But now the population is smaller, around 24,000, and local leaders won’t have much say when it comes to enforcing things like sales tax in the city. This can cause problems. The city earns between $3.6 and $3.8 million in sales taxes annually. So if they lose that rule, they’ll either have to raise property taxes for residents or lay people off.

“As visitors come in, whether to buy furniture or groceries by shopping in our grocery stores. This tax that generates help[ayforresidentswholivehere”saidcitymanagerRandyBukas“Andoverthepast4yearswehavenotraisedourtaxratebutweshouldconsiderraisingtaxasoneofthealternatives”[aypourlesrésidentsquiviventici»adéclaréledirecteurmunicipalRandyBukas«Etaucoursdes4dernièresannéesnousn’avonspasaugmenténotretauxd’impositionmaisnousdevrionsenvisagerd’augmenterlesimpôtscommeunseuldessolutionsderechange[ayfortheresidentsthatlivehere”saidcitymanagerRandyBukas“Andoverthepast4yearswehaven’traisedourtaxratebutwewouldhavetobelookingatraisingtaxesasoneofthealternatives”

In 2020, the city attempted to cut $1 million from the general budget. This resulted in the loss of jobs in the city, which could not be filled. Bukas says 17 jobs were lost because of those cuts, and that was just $1 million. Compare that with the $3.8 million they would lose from sales tax alone, and that’s more than triple the jobs they lost last year. The vote to keep this rule in place will take place on November 8 next year. Until then, the rule of origin will remain in place, allowing the freeport government to operate as intended.

Copyright 2021 WIFR. All rights reserved.

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Home rule

County commission holds committee meeting to discuss possible passage of ‘domicile rule’ – Grand Forks Herald

The Grand Forks County Commission held an Administrative Services Committee meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 2 to discuss the potential adoption of a “house rule” charter for Grand Forks County, but at least one commissioner think now might not be the time to move.

The discussion confirmed that the purpose of the move to self-government would be to allow for the introduction of a sales tax to create a new source of revenue for the county.

Home Rule gives authority to counties for municipal affairs instead of state laws. It is basically a local constitution that allows a county or municipality to do anything not specifically prohibited by the state constitution. It gives counties local control to make ordinances and decisions on local needs instead of the decisions of state legislatures. Raising taxes to solve financial problems is a common reason for its implementation, which is the reason cited by county commissioners.

Grand Forks County Administrator Tom Ford listed some “misconceptions” about the domestic diet at the meeting that the county should point out when selling the idea to citizens.

“It was really the Achilles heel the last time the county asked people for a self-reliance charter,” Ford said. “There was a lot of misinformation and misconceptions floating around out there.”

Ford cited a handful of myths, such as citizens losing influence in county government.

“Nothing could be further from the truth,” Ford said. “The thing is, residents will get more local input, such as the ability of the referendum to postpone local actions, and they’ll just have a bigger voice in the process in county government.”

Another myth he cited was that local autonomy allows local governments to pass new taxes without the consent of residents, which is also not true. It simply allows the county to offer new taxes for residents to vote on. He also said the rule of origin will not change the way property taxes are assessed, which will still rely on state law, or impact cities, townships, school districts, and other entities, due to its scope which only encompasses county government.

The Home Rule was most recently proposed in 2008 for the same reason – to propose a sales tax to pay for the costs of a new jail, in which only 16% of residents voted to approve it.

Commissioner David Engen said he believed the most important part of involving the public was to come before them with facts.

“We also have to sell this thing with facts and bust the myths,” Engen said. “People I’ve spoken to in Northwood and a few other places, they really see the fairness of a sales tax instead of it all being on people who own farmland, people who own their homes in city, tenants who do not pay it and etc. I think logic is on our side, but we have to get the word out.

The city of Grand Forks expects to generate about $10 million a year with a 1% sales tax, and a countywide sales tax would bring in even more revenue. Even a 0.5% sales tax would generate $100 million in additional revenue over the next 20 years.

Commissioner Tom Falck said he believed the time had not yet come to propose home rule.

“In my mind, I think we’re premature to move forward, and some of you probably won’t agree, but I think we could spend $50,000, and we can’t spend it. , in advertising, we can be anywhere we want to be to try to support this, and you’re not going to reach the majority of our voters,” Falck said. “I really think the timing is right, for the public to see how it will help them, is to continue this after the mill tax increase for the correctional facility, because every property owner in our county will receive a tax return with this increase.”

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