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June 2021

Self government

La Linea de la Concepcion takes a new step towards self-government

La Linea de la Concepción.

LA LINEA de la Concepcion takes a new step in its autonomy project

The team of the municipal government of La Línea de la Concepción, in the province of Cádiz, has taken a new step in its aspiration for the municipality to become an autonomous community like Ceuta and Melilla, and will present the ordinary plenary session of July 8 , an agreement to initiate the procedure allowing the holding of a popular consultation.

The report of this proposal, which will certainly go ahead, since the party that governs the Town Hall of this municipality of Cadiz, La Línea 100 × 100, has the absolute majority, and bases its argument on a justifying report prepared by the Municipality of La Linea itself, on the advisability of holding this consultation and directing to the Cortes Generales and the Spanish government the application of the constitutional mechanism – which is provided for in article 144/9 – to obtain the statute of autonomy .

The question to be asked in the said consultation is the following: “Do you think that it is appropriate for the town hall of La Línea de la Concepción to address a request to the Spanish government, and to the general courts, to request the conversion of the municipality? as an autonomous community, in accordance with article 144 a) of the Spanish Constitution? “.

The achievement of this objective would allow this municipality to benefit from an organic-functional regime, of competence and of political government similar to that established in the autonomous regions of Ceuta and Melilla.

In any case, as indicated by the town hall in its press release, it would be up to the Cortes Generales to grant the possibility of providing La Línea de la Concepción, by an organic law, with the condition of becoming an autonomous community, as indicated through sevilla.abc.es.

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Sovereignty

Westmoreland County restaurants rely on a combination of personal and government support

After eight years of co-owning and operating J&M Export Deli, Michelle Gilson feels like it’s her first year again.

Gilson, along with co-owner Jennifer Minnick, has been forced to make several economic changes to export-based deli over the past year – such as cutting staff to three employees and shortening hours of operation – after the pandemic of covid-19 caused state leaders to issue mitigation orders that nearly ravaged the restaurant industry.

“We just made ends meet,” Gilson said. “Don’t pay us, just pay our bills.”

They got federal funds to help the restaurant weather the pandemic, but Gilson said what they were given was only useful for about a month. Now women are squeezing over 50-hour workweeks to keep the grocery store running while they get back on their feet.

Sharon Detar, owner of Connections Café in Ligonier, said she too was more focused on paying her bills than bringing back a paycheck. To help save money, Detar said she closed the restaurant for six weeks at the start of the pandemic after realizing people were largely staying at home.

When it reopened, it reduced the hours of operation and the hours of its only employee. Still, Detar has gone to great lengths to make the restaurant appealing to those ordering take-out meals by tempering a building porch to include a rug and fireplace so it can be used during the winter months.

“Ligonier is a tourist town so the tourists weren’t there so it was, but the locals really supported me so it was great,” said Detar.

Scenes similar to those in Export and Ligonier unfolded in restaurants in the area after a year in which they were the subject of mitigation orders that began last March, when restaurants failed. could be opened to take away. Since then, owners have been at the mercy of ever-changing orders that determined capacity limits and when alcohol can be served.

To help businesses, federal lifelines such as stimulus funds and initiatives such as the Paycheck Protection Program were implemented throughout the year. Detar noted that she had received money from Westmoreland CARES Scholarship, as part of a federal stimulus plan.

Greg and Christina Cammerata, owners of IronRock Tap House, used the funds extensively to pay members of their management team who covered takeout orders after the owners of the Hempfield restaurant were forced to lay off nearly 60 hourly employees while throughout the year.

“Having to fire them just because there is no work, you just hate doing it because you know they have bills, and even if unemployment is available it’s a pain in the neck of go through all the paperwork and do it, ”Greg told Cammerata. “We’re just thankful that the staff stayed with us and kind of came out on the other side.”

In addition to federal funds, the Cammerata – who opened the Hempfield restaurant in December 2019, three months before Governor Tom Wolf made the first covid-19 related stop – also attributed their success throughout the pandemic to fact that they don’t rely on a paycheck from the restaurant.

Likewise, Sam Murray, owner of Salsa Sam’s, said he did not have loans on his restaurant Irwin, a factor that helped him get through the pandemic. Murray, who was extensively involved in the community when the pandemic hit, also attributed his success to take-out sales and his participation in breweries and community events.

“We can honestly say it went well because we kind of adjusted to the situation,” said Murray. “I haven’t, per se, moaned about it, whined about it. … I think what we did well with all of that was that we kind of got involved in the community, and that was so important.

Murray noted that he hadn’t laid off any employees or used federal funding because “I wanted to keep those funds for other restaurants that really, really need it.”

As restaurateurs scramble to get back on their feet, the long-term effects are starting to be felt in the form of a staff shortage being felt in most lines of business.

The shortage is forcing local restaurants to continue cutting hours to give employees a break despite being able to open at full capacity. However, restaurant chains are responding to the shortage by increasing the minimum wage for $ 15 an hour at places like Chipotle, while others, like McDonald’s, offer a signing bonus.

“You can’t take a break. … It’s just going to get busier and busier, and we have all these seats outside and it needs extra servers and what not to cover that up, so it’s a tough time right now trying to have it. people, but we’re working hard on it, ”said Greg Cammerata, noting that as of mid-May, the restaurant had between 12 and 15 positions open.

However, other restaurants like J&M Export Deli are not yet in the hiring phase. While Gilson said there was light at the end of the tunnel as restaurant sales began to increase, it’s not enough to extend hours or bring staff back to what they were before the pandemic.

“It’s like rebuilding it so that we can pay ourselves and then pay other people,” Gilson said.

Megan Tomasic is a writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Megan at 724-850-1203, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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Sovereignty

Government – Métis Nation of Ontario%

Self-government is a right that Métis citizens hold together, as members of the rights-holder Métis communities of which they are a part. The new Métis government will be formed by Métis citizens of all ages, who will work together to build and further strengthen our Métis government.

The MNO has learned much from past commitments to key governance principles and values ​​of MNO citizens through the MNO Commission on Métis Rights and Self-Government and its engagement sessions held in 2017. Now the MNO is planning a province-wide mobilization process. in order to consult the citizens of the MNO on the Self-Government Agreement and to develop the Constitution of the future Métis government.

All MNO citizens can participate in the Métis Government’s Constitution consultations, and all voters, including those living in southern Ontario, will be able to vote in the process of ratifying the Constitution and Accord. on self-government. What the future Métis government looks like is up to all of us. We want to hear from you!

Over the next few months there will be plenty of opportunities for all MNO citizens to get involved, offer ideas, listen to others, learn and reflect together. Stay tuned for information on how you can participate in town halls, workshops and MNO meetings and sign up to receive updates on the MNO’s journey to self-government.

You can also provide comments, submit questions, videos or other information by writing to ORM at [email protected].

Together, we will move forward with Métis self-government in Ontario!

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Self government

Local self-government in Armenia: positive developments but still room for improvement

Despite the positive developments of local self-government in Armenia, the powers of the municipalities have not been extended, their role in the provision of public services remains limited and local authorities do not have sufficient funds, says the monitoring report adopted today by the Council of Europe Congress local and regional authorities, which also provides recommendations to the Armenian government on improving the situation.

The report based on a country visit in May 2019 welcomes the fact that Armenia has ratified all the provisions of the European Charter of Local Self-Government. It also welcomes the consolidation of communities and the government’s legislative initiatives in the area of ​​local referendums, public hearings and financial aid to municipalities.

Despite these good developments, the powers and duties of the municipalities have not been extended to enable them to manage a substantial part of public affairs under their own responsibility. Municipalities have a limited role in the provision of public services, which goes against the principle of subsidiarity.

In addition, there is no legally guaranteed consultation procedure between the State and the municipalities, the local authorities are not adequately involved in the decision-making process concerning their finances and the local authorities are not consulted on the modifications of their territorial limits.


Congress website

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Sovereignty

Local self-government in Azerbaijan: little improvement observed, limited powers and weak financial situation of municipalities need urgent attention

Despite some improvements in the work of the municipalities, major concerns remain about a number of factors hampering the development of self-government in Azerbaijan, such as the lack of real powers of municipalities, a statute of institutions of state and own financial resources, says the monitoring report of the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, which also provides a number of urgent recommendations to the authorities.

The report prepared on the basis of a remote visit carried out in February this year, welcomes some improvements in Azerbaijan such as the ratification of Article 10.3 of the Charter which provides for the right to cooperate between municipalities and their counterparts. in other states (such cooperation, however, would require authorization from the Azerbaijani state authorities); improving the quality and transparency of the work of the municipalities; the use of delegation of functions to municipalities for the first time in 2020, and the increased representation of women and young people in municipal councils after the last municipal elections in 2019.

However, municipalities in Azerbaijan are not considered state institutions and are part of the overall public administration, but rather an expression of civil society, and their powers are not comprehensive and exclusive, the report says.


Local self-government in Azerbaijan: little improvement observed, limited powers and weak financial situation of municipalities need urgent attention

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Self government

Congress monitors the implementation of the European Charter of Local Self-Government in the UK

A delegation from the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe followed the application of the Charter in the United Kingdom from 21 to 23 June 2021.

The delegation was composed of the co-rapporteurs Vladimir Prebilič (Slovenia, SOC / G / PD) and Magnus Berntsson (Sweden, EPP / CCE). They held meetings with local and national authorities in the UK to assess the implementation of the Charter. The previous monitoring report and recommendation on local and regional democracy in the UK were adopted in 2014. All meetings were held remotely due to the current health crisis.

The rapporteurs had an exchange of views on the latest developments in the field of local government in the UK with officials from the Department for Housing, Communities and Local Government as well as with the Chairman of the Housing Committee, communities and local governments of the British Parliament. Remote meetings were also scheduled with the Statutory Deputy Mayor of London and representatives of the Greater London Authority.

The delegation had also scheduled remote meetings with officials from the Scottish Department of Social Security and Local Government, the Welsh Parliament, the Assembly of Northern Ireland and the Office of the Secretary of State for Wales.

The Congress delegation met with members of the UK National Delegation to Congress, the Local Government Association (LGA), the Northern Ireland Local Government Association (NILGA), the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA), as well as members of Edinburgh. Belfast City Council and Mayor.

The resulting report will be examined by the Monitoring Committee at one of its forthcoming meetings.

The UK ratified the European Charter of Local Self-Government in 1998. Countries that have ratified the Charter are bound by its provisions. The Charter requires the implementation of a minimum set of rights which constitute the fundamental basis of local self-government in Europe. The Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe ensures that these principles are respected in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe.

Contact:

Stephanie POIREL, Congress of Local and Regional Authorities
Secretary of the monitoring committee
Telephone: +33 (0) 3 90 21 5184
e-mail: [email protected]

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Sovereignty

Local self-government in Armenia: positive developments but still room for improvement concerning the skills, consultation and financial resources of local authorities

Despite the positive development of local self-government in Armenia, the powers of municipalities have not been extended, their role in the provision of public services remains limited and local authorities do not have sufficient funds, according to the report. the follow-up report adopted today by the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, which also provides recommendations to the Armenian government to improve the situation.

The report based on a country visit in May 2019 welcomes the fact that Armenia has ratified all the provisions of the European Charter of Local Self-Government. It also welcomes the consolidation of communities and the government’s legislative initiatives in the area of ​​local referendums, public hearings and financial aid to municipalities.

Despite these good developments, the powers and duties of the municipalities have not been extended to enable them to manage a substantial part of public affairs under their own responsibility. Municipalities have a limited role in the provision of public services, which goes against the principle of subsidiarity.

In addition, there is no legally guaranteed consultation procedure between the State and the municipalities, the local authorities are not adequately involved in the decision-making process concerning their finances and the local authorities are not consulted on the modifications of their territorial limits.

“We have been informed that during the recent merger process some local authorities and residents learned from the press about the mergers of their communities,” said Gunn Marit Helgesen (Norway, EPP / CCE), one of the rapporteurs who presented the report, noting that efficiency and broad communication on territorial reform “was still lacking in Armenia”.

“For the reform to be successful, it is important to give incentives to the merged communities. They need more power and therefore money to execute them, ”stressed Helgesen.

Bryony Rudkin (UK, SOC / G / PD), the co-rapporteur, echoed this concern. “Local authorities continue to lack the financial resources to carry out their own tasks,” she said. “In addition, the State does not make the corresponding resources available to communities when it delegates powers. As a result, many small communities simply cannot cope with the delegated tasks or cannot provide good quality services ”.

Rudkin highlighted other issues, such as the poor working conditions of municipal workers in local government offices and unwarranted state interference in local tasks: administrative oversight of local government decisions goes beyond control of legality and various state authorities have overlapping supervisory powers.

The Congress recommended that the Armenian government accompany the delegation of tasks by providing corresponding financial resources and ensure that local communities have access to adequate financial resources on their own; further decentralize powers to increase the share of public affairs that are regulated and managed by local authorities and to guarantee in law the right of local authorities to be consulted on matters which concern them directly, recommends the Congress. In addition, the “own” competences of municipalities should be revised and clarified, state supervision limited to legality control and the working conditions of municipal employees improved.

The rapporteurs described as “welcome steps” the information on some new legislative initiatives prepared by the government in the field of local referendums, public hearings and financial assistance to municipalities. “We are convinced that all political changes and reform efforts have opened up new perspectives and opportunities for democratic transformation in Armenia to have a positive impact on local democracy and we look forward to continuing the already long-standing cooperation we have with them. Armenian authorities, ”concluded Bryony Rudkin. .

*** 40th Congress Session (second part) ***

File 40th Session – Agenda – Documents: FR | FRA | DEU | ITA | RUS – Videos and photos

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Home rule

Andrew Tickell: Home Rule in this reactionary UK would not answer our problems

WHEN a DUP politician says “with my cold, dead hands,” you don’t expect him to wave a handful of sausages. But he stood there, Cro-Magnon, recreational naturist and East Antrim MP Sammy Wilson under a poster with the caption “Ulster is British.” Sammy doesn’t want to save Ulster from salami, but to deliver the Six Counties from the evils of Northern Ireland Protocol.

While Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal provided for the prospect of a physical infrastructure of border posts, it instead drew an effective regulatory border along the Irish Sea. This allowed Northern Ireland to remain in the single market and exclude the rest of the UK from it. The deal included rules on importing chilled meats – including Sammy’s handful of nods – from Britain to Northern Ireland. These rules were due to come into force in the spring, but the British government has decided to give itself a little more time to meet its obligations without discussing them with its European counterparts.

After unilaterally extending the grace period, Boris Johnson and his ministers have now decided that the “brilliant” deal they struck with the EU27 is now “excessively cumbersome”. Just as the burdensome commitments of fidelity in your wedding vows can be resolved by taking a ‘flexible and pragmatic approach’ to fidelity, Captain Impunity believes the harshness and reprimands of the EU should ease and view the protocol as guidelines rather than rules. After all, what is a little bit of a friend offense?

And now the UK government and its struggling former Democratic Unionist Party allies are staging, seemingly without irony, the storyline of a famous episode of Yes, Minister in real time.

According to Edwin Poots – the new DUP chief after Arlene Foster was ousted in April – the EU is trying to starve the ordinary population of Northern Ireland. “Processed meat is typical of foods that would be sold in Iceland and other stores,” he said. “It is very often the lower paid people who use these pizzas, lasagnas and various basic products. ”

I guess that’s not quite what Gordon Brown had in mind when he talks about the Union as an instrument of social justice. The people’s banger is a deep red, despite its modest meat content, chilled or not.

Not to be outdone, Boris Johnson’s Environment Secretary took to the airwaves to give the nation a touching speech about the condescension and culinary bigotry of our European friends and allies, protesting that he did not ” no idea “why the EU was imposing” idiosyncratic “rules on the mystery. meats crossing market borders. But the member for Camborne and Redruth had his suspicions.

READ MORE: High cost of Brexit for Scotch whiskey companies described in Commons

“I suspect it has to do with some sort of perception that they can’t really trust a country other than an EU country to make sausages,” George Eustice told Nick Ferrari. “I think this is nonsense. I think we have a very good sausage industry in this country, we have the highest food hygiene standards in the world ”, closing this noble address to LBC listeners with the moving finale:“ There is no problem with our sausages or even our chicken nuggets.

Now there is a slogan to put on your tanks. The scandalized meat factories of Lincoln and Cumbria unite.

They say that the laws are like sausages: it is better not to see them being made. This British government succeeded in combining the two unsightly exercises. But the concocted “sausage wars” are very much in keeping with the political absurdity that propelled Boris Johnson to and helps keep Boris Johnson there.

When he was starting out as a European correspondent for the Telegraph, a young Boris Johnson specialized in serving this kind of charcuterie to the indignant gammon of the newspaper, which swallowed up any history of Eurocrat diktats worthy of employment. , published by editors cynical enough to give their readers what they wanted no matter how economical their featured correspondent’s copy was.

EU-mandated banana smoothing, bans on the sale of cocktail shrimp crisps – these kinds of Brussels tales were not only the preserve of our future Prime Minister.

They have been a staple of right-wing Eurosceptic media in Britain for decades, reliably generating screaming headlines stoking imaginary grievances against the bloc, skillfully repackaging deregulation, lower welfare standards and less environmental protections like worker preference, and all the rest like unofficial, foreign namby-pambyism, “elf ‘n safety”.

READ MORE: Brexit caused UK services sector to contract by over £ 110bn

This kind of reactionary simplicity is absolutely at the heart of this government’s emotional tone and emotional appeal. It seems appropriate that the Conservatives are now representing Hartlepool. Legend has it that locals hanged a monkey that ran aground on a wreck off the coast because they believed it was one of Napoleon’s spies.

I’m not sure if this was one of the episodes Jacob Rees-Mogg had in mind when he spoke lyrical lyrics in the Commons last week about how we should all be proud of “our wonderful story”, but by the 18th century, the conflict between the UK and France was at least real.

Now we just have a UK government that intermittently talks as if it wants to, and tabloids poised to sink into feverish dreams of war, gunboats and Dunkirk on the drop of a cocked hat.

I guess this is an emotional distraction from any meaningful self-reflection on Britain’s true place in the world – the fact that Britain is now a solidly intermediate power, in decline, is consoled with nostalgia as ‘it considers the risk of a new internal fragmentation and the consequent loss of international prestige. Great Britain is not.

When he signed the Brexit deal, Johnson said it was an opportunity to “put an end to too many years of argument and division”, “to build a strong new relationship with the EU as friends and sovereign equals “and“ to move forward as one country. ”Good luck.

The figure of the indiscreet Brussels official – and the pantomime resistance to their decrees – is intrinsic to the Tory Eurosceptic worldview. The idea that leaving the European Union would remove such antipathies and suspicions from British politics is powerfully naive – especially when it is so clearly in the political interest of the Conservative Party to allow friction to continue.

It is in this context that we must understand the remarkable attempts to rehabilitate the idea that the ‘house rules’ are some kind of response to Scotland’s problems, by delegating more power to Holyrood, while leaving the government British as a sort of night watch state, responsible for defense and foreign affairs.

READ MORE: Alba MP Kenny MacAskill suggests Home Rule could heal ‘divided’ Scotland

First, this argument comes from a place of political unreality. This British government has no interest in this kind of reform program. On the contrary, this conservative administration has shown all the desire to reduce – rather than expand – the sphere of delegated authority. But more fundamentally still, why would anyone want the UK to retain these responsibilities?

If the sight of Boris Johnson dragging his pocket across the sands of Carbis Bay doesn’t convince you of the benefits of an independent foreign and defense policy, look at it. If the state of health services is important enough that you can delegate them, if education, justice and the environment are issues you would like to see addressed in Edinburgh rather than London, why would you want to questions about who and in what quantity do we sell bombs, against whom do we wage an aggressive war – to be determined by Her Majesty’s Government in London?

“Sticking with Britain for the ships, the bombs and the opportunity to kill and be killed in the country’s future wars” seems to me to be one of the craziest cases for the Union yet conceived . If you are prepared to reduce the role of the British state so far, why insist on leaving these critical issues in the hands of Boris Johnson, Dominic Raab and their successors?

Does your political experience really suggest that this is a smart plan?

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Self government

Bougainville envisages self-government in 2022

Bougainville President Ishmael Toroama has called for his autonomous region of Papua New Guinea to have a self-government in place by next year.

PNG Prime Minister James Marape (right) shakes hands with Ismaël Toroama, president of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, on February 5, 2021.
Photo: PNG MP Media

Toroama said this was part of the message he conveyed to PNG Prime Minister James Marape during the talks last month.

The talks were the last step in consultations between the two sides on how to proceed with the outcome of the Bougainville independence referendum, held in 2019.

In the non-binding referendum, 97.7% of Bougainvilleas voted for PNG independence. However, the PNG parliament must ratify the result for it to enter into force.

During the talks, Toroama told Marape and his delegation that Bougainville is expected to gain independence by 2025.

While PNG is reluctant to commit to a timeline for independence, the Bougainville Autonomous Government is working to give momentum to preparations to prepare for independence in the region.

In the meantime, Toroama is pushing for self-government as a practical step towards full independence.

Toroama spent the past week in southern Bougainville to launch what the government calls the “Independence Ready Mission” for three constituencies.

At events in Lato, Ramu and Kopi constituencies, the president presented his government’s schedule.

President Toroama said the road would be difficult, but the results of the referendum clearly showed the desire of the people to be an independent sovereign nation.

He called for the unity, hard work and perseverance of the people to accomplish the political destiny of Bougainville.

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Home rule

Alba MP Kenny MacAskill suggests Home Rule could heal ‘divided’ Scotland

FORMER SNP MP Kenny MacAskill has suggested Home Rule for Scotland could create a ‘constitutional stalemate’ in a ‘divided’ country.

Alba’s representative said while he remained committed to Scottish sovereignty, “something must be done to break the impasse” of constitutional politics.

Writing in the Scotsman, the former SNP justice secretary acknowledged the concept is not without ‘challenges’, citing his desire for the country to have power over defense and foreign policy, the removal of nuclear weapons and membership of EFTA or the EU.

READ MORE: Alba: Neale Hanvey and Kenny MacAskill replaced in Westminster committees

However, he added: “Having said that, we are in a constitutional stalemate in Scotland where not only is the nation deeply divided, as the polls continually show, but Scottish politics is the result.

“Indyref2 remains the main debate but has been rejected by Westminster and postponed indefinitely by Holyrood.”

The SNP and Greens manifestos both pledged to hold a referendum in the next parliament, although some pro-independence campaigners want the vote to take priority.

READ MORE: Scottish election came ‘too soon for Alba’, says Kenny MacAskill

MacAskill’s party, Alba, had called for negotiations with Westminster to begin immediately after the May election in their manifesto.

“Something must be done to break the impasse and move the country forward because the weekly cycle of ‘we demand it’ and ‘you don’t get it’ does no one any good,” the MP wrote. . He called on people to ‘think outside the box’ in times of coronavirus.

“It is clear that there is dissatisfaction in Scotland with the status quo and disinterest in the UK with the issues facing Scotland,” added MacAskill. “Let Scotland tackle these social and economic issues, as Jimmy Maxton passionately demanded a century ago. This would show Westminster’s willingness to take notice of Scottish democracy.

The MP’s comments sparked a row on social media, with some independence supporters criticizing the position. MacAskill has long suggested that his former party was not pushing self-determination hard enough.

“People who left the SNP for a party that *supposedly* would offer a bigger push for independence are now turning away from independence themselves,” WG Saraband wrote. “You just can’t make this stuff up.”

“So much for the #Alba party which supports independence. Gordon Brown would even be proud of this position,” wrote SNP MP Chris Law.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon denies £600,000 ‘disappeared’ from SNP accounts

Others felt that it was reasonable to discuss this possibility. “He makes a good point though, and Home Rule is probably more realistic in the medium term,” one supporter wrote.

“Read the article please, this is a guy who gives an opinion on what happens when, we ask that they refuse,” added another. “No ‘We’ve got high morals’ against a government that couldn’t spell Moral or High Ground. Just a compromise suggestion, of how it should have been two equals.

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