Sunday, May 26, 2019
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Can You Receive Social Security Disability Medicaid?

SSDI eligible

SSDI eligible

If you keep a job for a certain period of time but have become disabled before retirement age, you may be eligible for SSDI. Whether you qualify will depend on how old you were when you were weakened and the duration of your previous work. For example, a 50-year-old applicant must work for at least seven years in order to receive benefits. You should also be able to document the extent and nature of your disability.

Medicaid eligible

Medicaid eligible

Medicaid is a publicly funded program designed to help you pay needy people for health care regardless of their employment history. But because it is collectively administered by federal government and states, Medicaid rules and benefits vary considerably across the country. In particular, the level of income that Medicaid qualifies for is decided by each state. In general, an SSDI recipient who also receives Medicaid should be able to document that he cannot afford medical care without both forms of assistance.

advantages

advantages

Everyone who has worked for taxable wages receives an annual income statement from the Social Security Administration. If you qualify for SSDI, you will receive monthly cash payments in an amount based on the average of these earnings over your lifetime. Some of your family members may also be entitled to payments. Medicaid covers basic healthcare services such as those provided by doctors, nurses, hospitals and laboratories. Some states supplement Medicaid with cover for prescription drugs and dental and / or vision care.

Returning to their work

Returning to their work

If you return to work for a nine-month trial period, your SSDI payments will not reduce how much you earn. If you qualify for Medicaid, these benefits will also continue during the trial period. Beyond that period, your SSDI payments can be extended to 36 months as long as you earn no more than $ 1000. Whether your Medicaid coverage can continue will depend on revenue eligibility rules in your state.

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